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Full text of "Sponsor"



M^HIillii 



WlOHAL 






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SP 10-49 12220 

M I 5 j F RANC P **GUC 

N A T I N A I I0A0CASTIN 

FELLER i" J I A 2 A 

r 



V 



le use magazine for Radio and TV advertisers 



14 JULY 1952 



50c per copy • $8 per year 




reasons 
why 

YOU 

can 

SELL 

N.Y. 

on 

channel 




WOR-tv offers you: 

* low-budget programs 



'e. 



c. 



O 



* low-cost facilities 






% 



/. 



% 



'% 



<fc 



^ 



-V 






* time rates at Oct. '51 level 

* non-preemption guaranteed 

* New York's finest studios 

* top film facilities 

* prime 60-second availabilities 

* live-commercial opportunities 

* sales-booster saturation plans 



ACT NOW Or-'BtOjfr. 

for best availabilities^ 

orders for Fall campaigns Mify ^ 

now being signed. 



^ 



America's best tv-spot buy 

WOR-tv 



serving over 3 ,000 ,000 TV homes 
in the world's largest market 



6th annual 



FACTS 



issue 



'all economic 
nitlook 4( 



t' etwork 
pot 

Radio Basics 



99 



Television 

tetwork 
ap 
Spot 
TV Basics 



131 
13 
155 
169 



Radio-TV 
Abroad 



International 



" 



asics 




$, 



WU£tfflCUl/l/ Biscuit Company does a complete job . . . 



SO DO HAVENS AND MARTIN, Inc. STATIONS... 



r 



v: 



WMBG 
WCOD 
WTVR 




FIRST STATIONS OF VIRGINIA 



In Ohio, Kentucky, West Virginia, Virginia, 
North Carolina and South Carolina 
Strietmann Zesta Crackers, and many other 
Strietmann crackers and cookies, stand for 
top quality in their field. And no wonder. 
Today's mammoth and spotless Strietmann plant 
is traditional of baking progress that 
has never stopped: 86 years of experience 
in a single industry. 

Havens and Martin Stations are pioneers in 
their field, too. In the growing Virginia markets 
of which Richmond is the center, WMBG, WTVR, 
and WCOD are the only complete broadcast 
institution. Virginians love them because 
they combine wholesome entertainment, 
real service, and quality operation. That's a 
combination that works well for advertisers. 



WMBG ^ WCOD- WTVR tv 



Havens & Martin Inc. Stations are the only 
complete broadcasting institution in Richmond. 
Pioneer NBC outlets for Virginia's first market. 

WTVR represented nationally by Blair TV, Inc. 
WMBG represented nationally by The Boiling Co. 



*^ta 




CBS affiliates 

group getting 

lowdown on net 

business deals 



CBS Radio now 

within 7% of 

last September's 

business 



CBS affiliates 

would abandon 

radio ratings 



Reps pitching 

for ABC's 

o&o stations 



Tide has best 
remembered com- 
mercials in 
Advertest poll 



Langworth radio 

programs sales 

better '51 total 



WOR-TV first 

N.Y. station 

in all-night 

operation 



CBS will lay practically all cards on table when it meets with affili- 
ates committee, headed by George B. Storer, late in summer to discuss 
problem of rate adjustmen t. "Facts of life" will probably include 
revelation that network anticipated obtaining affiliate assent to rate 
reduction when it closed renewal contract with Procter & Gamble for 
15 nighttime quarter hours recently. Also explained will be how CBS 
has had to make various other concessions to keep business going. In 
this hair-down session network expected likewise to set down factors 
which determined decision to take risk with regard affiliate reaction. 

-SR- 

CBS during rump affil i ates meeting on network rate crisis first week 
of July disclosed its radio network already had 93% as much business 
sold for this fall as it had under contract last September. (List 
of network's nighttime sponsored programs for the fall on page 50.) 

-SR- 

Item in resolution which CBS rump affiliates meeting adopted that made 
decided impression on assembled broadcasters was declaration network 
immediately begin program of sound qualitative resea rch that would 
"establish real value and impact of radio as an advertising medium." 
Resolution also urged abandonment as selling tool of radio all present 
purely quantitative ratings systems. 

-SR- 

ABC has received pitches from several national rep organizations with 
regard to taking over national spot represen tat ion of network's owned 
and operated stations (5 radio and 5 TV). This function is now per- 
formed by the network's own Local Sales setup. Markets involved are 
New York, Chicago, Detroit, Los Angeles, and San Francisco. 

-SR- 

Tide, Philip Morris, Flamingo, Bulova and Muriel cigars rated as best 
remembered spo t TV commercial s among New York families in compilation 
released by Advertest Research. Also listed in top 20 — with survey 
conducted minus aid or recall devices — were Chevrolet, Piels, 
Schaefer, Clorets, Pall Mall, Castro convertible couches, Ivory, 
Kools, Motts apple juice, Benrus, Raleigh, Hellman's, Rheingold. 

-SR- 

Langworth Feature Programs reports its business for first 6 months 
1952 steadily increased to point total was mu c h over figure for same 
period 1951. (Library service business as whole reviewed page 76.) 
Like Langworth, other makers musical programs have found going good. 

-SR- 

WOR-TV, N.Y., going on all-night trick starting 19 July. Schedule 
will mix live programing, feature and short film, disk jockeys, news 
sports from 11;50 p.m. to 5 a.m. Monday through Friday and to 6 a.m. 
Saturdays. More stations will probably follow suit in major metro- 
politan markets. WDTV, Pittsburgh, was first with all-night operation. 



SPONSOR, Volume 6. No. 11. 11 July 1952. Published biweekly by SPONSOR Publications. Inc., at :(110 Elm Ave., Baltimore, Mil. Executive, Editorial, Advertising, Circu- 
lation Offices 510 Madison Ave., New York 22. $8 a year in U. S. $9 elsewhere. Entered as second class matter 29 January 1949 at Baltimore. Md. postofflce under Act :! March 1879. 



REPORT TO SPONSORS tor 14 July 1952 



Old Cold, Lucky 

don't want to 

stretch out 



Transcription 

tagging may 

be abolished 



P. Lorillard (Old Gold) and American Tobacco (Lucky Strike) each 
issued communiques to the press disavowing any intentions of turning 
out k ing-sized versions of these brands, a la Chesterfield. Lorillard 
is content to let Embassy carry king-size banner for that house, while 
American regards success of its Pall Mall entry in that field ample 
for one company. 

-SR- 

Transcription Rules Committee of N ARTB preparing to ask FCC to abolis h 
rule requiring stations to tag recorded, transcribed or filmed shows 
as such. Path for petition was eased by informal session with com- 
mission. (SPONSOR 25 February issue treated situation from viewpoint 
of advertisers, who urged immediate revocation of rule.) 

-SR- 

Y ellow marg a rine campaign in New York State week of 1 July stepped up 
to point where Lever Bros. ' Good Luck brand scheduled 2,700 4- and 
8-second announcements in 12 cities, with barrage crowded into 8 days. 
Kraft's Parkay carried out $30,000 spot blitz of its own in TV as well 
as radio, and Standard Brands' Blue Bonnet package moved into fray 
with weekly schedule of about 200 announcements. State's dairy inter- 
ests have been striking back with newspaper ads, but there are no 
indications whether butter forces will include radio and TV in their 
counterattack. 

-SR- 

Crosley grants Crosley Broadcasting Corp. has given Miami University's School of 



N. Y. spot busi- 
ness benefits as 
margarine 
goes yellow 



$10,000 for 
election study 



8% of all farm 

families in U. S. 

own TV sets 



RCA to launch 

biggest ad 

campaign in 

its history 



Murphy added to 
ARF board 



CBS TV Work- 
shop to run 26 
weeks with Ford 
Foundation grant 



Business Administration $10,000 for stud y on TV's role in 1952 
elections. School's marketing department will direct research. 

-SR- 

Market Research Corp. of America, formerly Industrial Surveys Co. 
(Sam Barton), reports that as of January 1952 farm families owned 3%% 
of all TV s e ts in country and that of all farm families in U.S.A. 8% 
owned TV sets. 

-SR- 

RCA Victor launches heaviest ad schedule in its history this month. 
Campaign, stressing company's lowest price TV set, includes Meredith 
Wilson radio show and Curtain Call on TV, both NBC. Leading consumer 
and trade magazines and 109 newspapers are on schedule. 

-SR- 

Adrian Murphy, CBS-Radio president, and E. A. Schirmer, of Crowell- 
Collier, have been nominated to Advertising Research Foundation's 
directorate. Others on board include Lowry H. Crites, General Mills; 
Marion Harper, Jr., McCann-Erickson ; F. B. Manchee, BBDO, and D. P. 
Smelser, Procter & Gamble. 

-SR- 
Ford Foundation starts underwriting CBS' Televis ion Workshop 9 
November as 90-minute show. Guarantee is for 26 week s and money comes 
out of Foundation's initial $1,200 ,000 grant for quality TV and radio 
programs. Series will include original scripts by Maxwell Anderson, 
French ballet features, and music by Leopold Stokowski ; it may be 
sponsored. 



SPONSOR 



BBDO 



RADIO AND TELEVISION 



NATIONAL NETWORK PROGRAMS 



TELEVISION 




batten, barton, durstine & osborn, inc. Advertising 

NEW YORK • II. .-Hi". • BUFFALO • CHICAGO • CLEVELAND • PITTSBURGH ■ MINNEAPOLIS • SAN FRANCISCO • HOLLYWOOD • LOS ANGELES • DETROIT 



14 JULY 1952 



18,741 

rural folk? from 
all 88 Ohio counties 
travelled an average 
of 75 miles I and caused 
the first rural traffic jam 
ever recorded at the 
junction of Route 23 and 
Powell Road — site of 
WRFD's new studios 
and 260 acre radio farm) 
to attend our recent 
Open House celebration. 

Col. C. M. "Pop" Hess, 
72 year old WRFD farm sales 
representative, greeted 
every one of the 18,741 
personally as they walked 
through the beautiful 
Colonial entrance to Ohio's 
finest rural radio center. 

We invited our listeners 
with spots on WRFD. 
And we think the fact that 
18,741 of 'em came . . . 
from all 88 counties . . . 
is proof enough that 
WRFD COVERS OHIO. 
And that rural Ohio 
listens to WRFD. 

We're not bashful, either, 
about the fact that 
WRFD reaches more Ohio 
rural folks at lower cost 
per thousand listeners 
than any other radio station 
in Ohio. 

Like to know more about 
Ohio's best rural radio buy? 
Drop us a card — we'll 
send you a fistful of facts 
by return mail. 

WRFD 

5000 W • 880 KC 

Worth. ngton, Ohio FR 2-5342 

J. D. Bradshaw, Station Manager 

O L. TAYLOR CO.— National Representative 



VOL 6 NO, 14 
14 JULY 1952 

Contents 



SPONSOR REPORTS 1 

510 MADISON 5 

MEN, MONEY AND MOTIVES 12 

MR. SPONSOR: H. P. WURMAN 14 

P. S. 16 

NEW AND RENEW 19 

COMMERCIAL REVIEWS 24 

WHAT'S NEW IN RESEARCH 30 
AGENCY PROFILE: ADRIAN SAMISH 34 

HOW TO USE THIS ISSUE 37 

FALL ECONOMIC OUTLOOK 40 

SPONSOR CHECK LIST 42 

NETWORK RADIO 43 

SPOT RADIO 65 

RADIO BASICS 99 

NETWORK TV 131 

TV MAP 137 

SPOT TV 155 

TV BASICS 169 

GENERAL (WITH FILM) 185 

MR. SPONSOR ASKS 204 

INTERNATIONAL BASICS 227 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 236 







Editor & President: Norman R. Glenn 
Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glenn 
Executive Editor: Ben Bodec 
Managing Editor: Mile^ David 
Senior Editors: Chailes Sinclair, Alfred J. Jaffe 
Department Editor: Fred Birnbaum 
Assistant Editors: Lila Lederman, 
Richard A. Jackson, Evelyn Konrad 
Contributing Editors: Bob Landry, Bob Foreman 
Art Director: Donald H. Duffy 
Photographer: Jean Raeburn 
Vice President - Advertising: Norman Knight 
Advertising Department: Edwin D. Cooper 
(Western Manager), George Weiss (Travel- 
ing Representative, Chicago Office), Maxine 
Cooper (New York Office), John A. Kovchok 
(Production Manager), Cynthia Soley, John 
McCormack 

Vice President - Business Mgr.: Bernard Piatt 
Circulation Department: Evelyn Satz (Sub 
scription Manager). Emily Cutillo, Josephine 
Doloroso, Patricia Collins (Readers' Service) 
Secretary to Publisher: Augusta Shearman 
Office Manager: Olive Sherban 



Published biweekly hv SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC.. 

combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circulation, and 
Advertising Offices: 510 Madison Ave.. New York 22. 
N. Y. Telephone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 
161 E. Grand Ave.. Suite 110. Telephone: Superior 7-9863 
West Coast Offlre: 6087 Sunset Boulevard. I-os Angeles 
Telephone: Hillside 8(189. Printing Office: 3110 Elm 
Ave.. Baltimore 11, Md. Subscriptions: lnlted States 
$8 a year, Canada and foreign $9. Single copies 50c 
Printed In V. 8. A. Address all correspondence to 51* 
Madison Avenue. New York 22. N.Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. 
Copyright 1952. SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



WANTED! 

For Murder 




BOB BAILEY 

alias 

George Valentine 

(Private "eye") 




VIRGINIA GREGG 

alias 

"Brooksie", his secretary 

MURDERING all 

competitor's ratings in 



let George Do /f 



// 



52 transcribed half-hours 
12.3 Pacific Coast Neilsen on 
Don Lee Network. 
(March '52) 
Available for local or regional 
sponsorship east of the Rockies. 
CAUTION: This program is 
dangerous in the hands of 
competition. Prompt action is 
advised. Cet full information 
from 




Madison 



OIL COMPANIES ON THE AIR 

In the list of "Who's Who on the 
Networks: 1950-52," contained in your 
issue of June 16, it is noted that com- 
panies using Western networks appar- 
ently are not included. At least this is 
true of the oil companies. 

At the same time, oil companies who 
use Eastern networks are included. 

Is this arrangement intentional, or 
is it just one of those cases that so 
often happens where the Pacific Coast 
is overlooked? 

M. A. Mattes 
Standard Oil Co. of Cal. 
San Francisco 



• According to James M. Boerst, editor, the 
FACTuary is intended to include only national 
network programs and advertisers, as distinct 
from regional networks. However, if the name 
of a regional net advertiser has crept onto their 
list, it is becanse the source did not make it 
clear that said advertiser was only regional, not 
coast-to-coast. 




CO-OP RADIO 

CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR 
THOROUGH TREATMENT OF RA- 
DIO'S CO-OP PROBLEM. 

Haydn R. Evans 
WBAY, Green Bay. Wise. 



On page 36 of your June 16 issue 
is the story captioned, "Co-op Radio's 
Biggest Headache." We note that 
"double billing plagues this profitable 
form of advertising. National adver- 
tisers are being bilked with all radio 
taking the blame for deals made by the 
relatively few sharpshooters." 

To this the radio industry should re- 
ply "nuts."' 

You would think that newspapers 
weren't double billing. Radio learned 
this trick from newspapers. We en- 
close a tear sheet from yesterday's is- 
sue of a newspaper. Do you want to 
have some fun? Ask the national ad- 
vertisers represented on this page what 
they paid this retail store for this co- 
op space. Compare it to the news- 
paper's rate card, photostat of which 
we also enclose. 

This retailer earns a rate in the 
newspaper of 61# or less per inch. 
You will find that the national adver- 
tisers on these pages have reimbursed 



>V 



WIBC > land... 




Biy as 
America's 
Hth lAiryest 
MarUetl 



It's a fact 



V WIBC 

V WIBC 
^ WIBC 

V WIBC 

V WIBC 

V WIBC 



Indianapolis, is Indiana's first and only 50,000 
Watt Station. 



coverage includes 78 counties in 4 states. 



reaches and sells more than 3 1 2 million people inside 
its .5 milivolt area. 



listeners spent over $4 billion on retail goods alone 
last year. 



offers you a market larger than Boston, Cleveland 
or San Francisco with more people than New Orleans, 
Milwaukee and Kansas City combined! 



offers you this big market, equal to the 6th largest 
in the nation at the lowest cost per thousand avail- 
able in the Indianapolis area! 



BUY TODAY...SELL TOMORROW ! 



WIBC, Inc. 

30 W. Washington St. 

INDIANAPOLIS 6. INDIANA 



JOHN BLAIR & CO. — National Representatives 




14 JULY 1952 



2,779,531 



* 



Rich-From-The-Soil 
Midwesterners Live 
Within KMAs Vi MV Line 

At last count, 2,799,531 predomi- 
nantly-rural midwesterners lived 
within the KMA \i Millivolt day- 
time contour area in Iowa, Nebraska, 
Missouri and Kansas. That's a mar- 
ket greater than Iowa, Washington 
State or Oklahoma — or, Colorado 
and Nebraska combined! 

They're America's top-spending 
farm market! In 1950 these KMA- 
Landers spent $2,819,660,000 for 
goods and services — a figure sur- 
passed only by a handful of metro- 
politan markets! 

Here is THE big farm market . . . 
served by the 5,000 powerful watts 
of KMA — The Midwest's TOP Farm 
Station. IF YOU sell products or 
services in the rural and small town 
midwest, then YOU BELONG ON 
KMA! Contact Avery-Knodel or 
KMA today. 
* 1950 Census. 




KMA 



SHENANDOAH, IOWA 

Represented by 
Avery-Knodel, Inc. 



IN 



, OMAHA •» '"' Vi.^ 



i «, "s qreaT 



CBS . DU*0HT • 



ABC 



Under Management of 

MAY BROADCASTING CO. 

Shenandoah, Iowa 



the advertiser at the rate of 90^ per 
inch. 

WRNO does not condone double 
billing; neither should the radio in- 
dustry accept the stigma of double bill- 
ing and the handicap that it places on 
the industry, as a fault that is exclu- 
sivel) radios. 

This kind of thinking robs radio of 
thousands of dollars of advertising 
revenue. Worse, it weakens the posi- 
tion of radio with the national adver- 
tiser who is also spending money in 
co-op programs. 

Now that sponsor has labeled the 
radio industn with the "double billing 
plague" we propose that sponsor ex- 
plore the double billing plague in the 
newspaper industry. Such a story 
would be as well founded as this one 
on page 36 in the current issue. Fur- 
thermore, it would be far more valu- 
able to the industry. 

We are looking forward to an early 
issue of sponsor in which you will 
have developed a story on double bill- 
ing showing national advertisers that 
the\ are being bilked by newspapers. 

Frank B. Best 

II nXO, Orangeburg, S. C. 



O The article expressly look note of douhlc- 
hilling practices hy newspapers, stating that it 
"has had a venerable history in newspapers anil 
still plagues national advertisers in that field." 
The artiele further quoted from a survey hy the 
Wisconsin distributor for Phileo to the effect that 
22% of the newspapers queried said they would 
''make a deal by-passing their regular rate card." 



I dont know who is responsible for 
your slor\ on co-op radio appearing 
in the June ICth issue, but I am thor- 
oughly in accord with it and cant re- 
sist the temptation to expound a little 
myself. 

This double billing situation appears 
to me to be critical and if it continues 
as it is now and has been for some 
time, it means that the top manufac- 
turers will withdraw radio from their 
approved list eligible for this type of 
advertising, and here, as in the major- 
ity of other markets, this reaches a 
substantial figure and stations are go- 
ing to be hard hi! if and when that 
time arrives. 

We have never permitted double 
billing and I would be afraid to sa) 
how much inone\ this has cost us in 
revenue, but we have to live with our- 
selves and in my opinion it is a dis- 
honest practice. 



Let me say, however, that the radio 
stations themselves are not exclusive- 
ly to blame for the situation because 
the manufacturers themselves in a 
great many instances have encouraged 
it. if not the home office certainly it 
has been with the knowledge and con- 
sent of the manufacturers' local rep- 
resentative. 

This market is heavy with wholesale 
distributors and it is particularly true 
in the appliance field where co-op 
money is the heaviest. I have in- 
stances in my files where within a pe- 
riod of 48 hours from the same manu- 
facturer we have had co-op proposals 
varying in manufacturers" participa- 
tion from 25', to 1009,. One piece 
of business recalled was particularly 
painful because it was a substantial 
amount and inasmuch as ''shady'" bill- 
ing was required to get it. we lost the 
business. 

With two distributors in the appli- 
ance field we have succeeded in pretty 
well curbing it. We found these dis- 
tributors sympathetic with the situa- 
tion and we suggested to them that if 
the distributors would contract for the 
placement of their schedules and per- 
mit us to bill them with the total 
amount of money involved with our 
regular proof of performance affidavit 
and he in turn bill his dealer for his 
proportionate part, that this would 
control the practice. 

These two distributors are giving us 
v considerable volume of business now, 
the billing is handled as outlined above 
and they feel like they are getting their 
money's worth in their expenditures. 
But we have found that some of the 
distributors, and in our case unfortu- 
nately the majority of them, do not 
want to handle it in this manner, their 
contention being that this increases 
their credit risk. 

I pass this information on to you 
and I sincerely hope that sponsor 
will keep pounding on this until an 
industry-wide result is obtained, for if 
it isn't we as a whole are going to lose 
a substantial amount of money. 

Frank King 

WMBR, Jacksonville. Fla. 

• The telegram from Haydn R. Evans of w BAY. 
the letters from Frank I). Beat of WRNO anil 
Frank King of WMItR are only a few of the com- 
ments SPONSOR received on its article al t 

co-op radio and the double-billing plague. Most 
of the comments were to the effect that the more 
light shed on the matter the better. Responsible 
radio station executives apparently feel that their 
stations are being hurl by operator- who partici- 
pate in activities which bilk national firms having 
co-op plan-. If you have anj comments to add 
to those above, address a letter to SPONSOR at 
510 Madison Avenue. New ■» ork 22. >. * . 



SPONSOR 



What kind of pressure creates 

the best advertising? 




It usually isn't the pressure of time, 
or work — not client-pressure, not boss- 
pressure. 

Nearly always it is simply the pres- 
sure a man puts on himself — the pres- 
sure to keep seeking a better way of 
doing something which is already be- 
ing done well. 

It is a pressure that is being applied 
every day, in every department of 
Young & Rubicam. 

YOUNG & RUBICAM, INC. 



Advertising • New York Chicago Detroit San Francisco 
Hollywood Montreal Toronto Mexico City London 



SPONSOR 




HOLLAND WEDDING PROGRAM 

It's a large stack of ballots on the 
table in front of Larry Collins, pro- 
gram director of WHTC, as he an- 
nounces the final results of the Holland 
Wedding program for 1952. 

Each year the program gets bigger 
and bigger! The final count this year 
was 480,000,000 votes. At a penny 
each that means $480,000 worth of 
sales went through the cash registers 
of the participating sponsors. Last 
year the tabulation was $273,000. 

In 1951 we had 38 participating 
sponsors and this year we had 45. We 
had 33 couples last year compared to 
38 this year. The merchandise to be 
given away this year was valued at 
$3,500 compared to awards valued at 
$1,600 in 1951 — and it grows every 
year. 

It's the hottest thing I have seen in 
my years in radio, and I would like to 
see other stations use it. 

As I told you before I like what you 
are doing toward helping the little in- 
dependents so I make this offer to your 
readers if enough stations are inter- 
ested to make it worth while. I will 
send them a complete outline of how 
we run the program, samples of the 
voting ballots, posters and all neces- 
sary information — all for only $10. 
As you know this will barely pay for 
the paper, stencils, mimeographing, 
handling and mailing. 

This idea can be used by any station 
from the small cities up to the size 
where they lose personal contact with 
the listeners and they just become a 
series of numbers on a chart. It needs 
the personal touch and if you have 
that contact with your listeners it will 
be sure fire. It could be sold to an in- 
dividual store or on a participating 
basis as we sell it. 

Last year it brought the station a 
billing of $2,000 and many new spon- 
sors. This year we grossed $5,850. 
Running the program on a 13 week 
basis as we did that was an extra week- 
ly billing of $450 which is very good 
for a small town. 

Its a program that the entire popu- 
lation can participate in provided, as 



I said, that the city is not too large. 
And believe me, the merchants go foi 
it. 

I know there are hundreds of sta- 
tion like us that can't afford to pay 
high prices for packaged shows, so 
here is a chance to get one that won't 
cost them $1.00 a week — and it will 
outpull and outsell any package show 
available. 

Don't let the small price fool you 
for you will get the complete program 
idea and all the information you need 
to operate it successfully. You will not 
get any fancy brochures, though, at 
this price. 

Sandy Meek, Mgr. 

Holland Broadcasting Co. 

Holland, Mich. 



EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMING 

Robert L. Landry's column. "'Illiter- 
ates Are Tough Customers," illustrated 
beautifully the problem facing radio 
and TV. 

Unfortunateh there are many R. C. 
Hoiles — ( I don't know him personally I 
but I'm sure his counterparts are deep- 
ly involved in cheating the public of 
their right to the "best in educational 
entertainment." 

Both departmental and executive 
brass are equally to blame for the 
narrowmindedness, stupidity and out- 
right dishonesty so prevalent in per- 
sonnel and programing departments. 
Or maybe I'm wrong — perhaps it is 
the sponsor whose demands prevent 
true adult-educational and good enter- 
tainment from reaching the masses. 

Among friends I have advocated ra- 
dio and TV shows with an educational 
core. A great injustice has been done 
the general public. Most human be- 
ings are hard working, fine, ever pa- 
tient and willing to learn. 

They have above all the understand- 
ing and broad intellect to set aside dif- 
ferences — undertake the impossible 
and solve the difficult. Can you say as 
much for the persons who program 
children's shows which confuse, fright- 
en, and foster stupidity? Adult shows 
which operate at so high a pitch as to 
upset the entire household? Program- 
ing which never once considers the 
fact that the "family shopper" and 
"head of the household" is interested 
in learning and understanding as well 
as buying. 

KAYE PllYLLIPS 

Laurelton 13, L. I. 
(Please turn to page 54 I 



First or Second in 




Quarter Hours 

Between 6 a.m. and 7p.nu 



WFBR "HOME-GROWN" 

SHOWS OUTSTANDING 

IN AUDIENCE AND 

RESPONSE! 

Looking for a place to put 
your minute spots in Balti- 
more? Pick the WFBR 
' ' home-growns' ' — outstand- 
ing participation shows! For 
instance: 



CLUB 1300 



Completely outclasses its 
field — No . 1 show of its kind ! 



MELODY BALLROOM 



Top-rated disc jockey show 
in Baltimore! 



NELSON.BAKER SHOW 



1st in its time period! 



EVERY WOMAN'S HOUR 



Top-rated 30 - minute 
woman's show! 



shoppin'fun 



Top locally produced show 
in its period! 



MORNING IN MARYLAND 



Misses being tops for 3-hour 
period by a fraction! 

Buy where the top shows 
are — buy on . . . 



*Jon. -Feb. 1952 
Pulse Report 




ABC NETWORK 

5000 WATTS IN BALTIMORE, MD. 



14 JULY 1952 



■ 



We don't believe 
in TV angels 



Definition of an angel (in show business): Anyone who 
gambles a wad on a show. 

Definition of an angel (in TV): Any advertiser who gambles 
a wad on a show. 

Frankly, we don't believe in TV angels. 

We know that TV doesn't have to be a gamble. It can be a solid, 
money-making investment. 

It can be, that is, if your agency can give you four things: 

1. Sound judgment in the selection of a program — judgment 
aided and abetted by skillful research. 

2. A correct matching of your program to your marketing pattern. 

3. Complete merchandising exploitation of your program. 

4. Commercials full of good, simple, clear-cut sell. 

If you suspect that you yourself have been a TV angel — or if you're 
afraid you might become one— your next move is clearly indicated: 

Just get in touch with McCann-Erickson. 



McCann-Erickson, Inc. 

AClVCrtlSing New York, Boston, Cleveland, Detroit, Chicago, Cincinnati, 
San Francisco, Los Angeles, Hollywood, Portland and offices throughout the world. 





» 



On 

KROW 




a 



Jy^ buck 

makes 
more 
dough! 




In San Francisco & Oakland- 

"We tested several media and 
KROW sold far more merchan- 
dise per dollar invested than 
any of the other types of ad- 
vertising. We've seen at first 
hand that KROW is geared to 
do a re nl selling job." 
In scores of sales tests KROW 
h.is proved itself the top me- 
dium in the San Francisco-Oak- 
land market. 

for names and details, call 

PAUL H. RAYMER COMPANY, INC. 

National Representatives 



KROW 

Radio Cantor Bldg. 
19th A Broadway • Oakland, Calif. 

Serving the Entire Oakland-San Francisco Bay Area 




by 

Robert J. Landry 



Relief from competition? 

Herewith another of this publication's Fall Facts issues. But. of 
course, the really big fall fact of 1952 will not be established until 
after the first Tuesday in November. 



Regardless of the outcome of the Presidential race, it is certain 
that one theme is going to be hammered, hammered, hammered. 
That is the desperate desire of big wheels and ordinary Joes, both, 
for tax relief. Some relief. Any relief. High, medium, and low 
gentry dream of ease of anguish. 



Tax relief is no easy feat, and this column will now offer nothing 
more specific than a pious "amen." Others will have to figure out 
how to arm ourselves and the free world, against the Bolsheviki 
and at the same time not hand every individual American citizen a 
satchel full of rocks to carry. 

* * * 

One thing we hope won't develop, however, because of the present 
irritability with tax burdens. Tax relief is one thing. Tariff relief 
against foreign competition is something else. There is a distinctly 
nervous feeling in the capital of our best friend and ally, Britain, 
that America may slam the door of reciprocal trade in their faces. 

* * * 

Speaking to the Advertising Federation of America at the Waldorf 
Astoria last month Sir Miles Thomas, president of the British Adver- 
tising Association, laid it on the line. "British manufacturers are 
disturbed, to put it mildly and politely, at the tendency of some 
United States manufacturers of competitive or related lines to seek 
'home' protection against foreign competition. . . . The fact is, of 
course, that what we want is to trade mutually with the United 
States. We cannot do that unless the United States will buy our 
goods, and go on buying them." 

* * * 

He didn't mention the motorcycle companies, but it is well known 
that our motorcycle companies' efforts to shut out British machines 
has become very much of an " international crisis" in London, how- 
ever little appreciated as such on this side. The situation in cheese 
affects Britain, Denmark, France. Holland, Italy, and Switzerland, 
all save the last country part of our European line of defense against 
the Soviet Union. 

* * * 

British business hesitates to commit itself for expansion and — 

note this — advertising expenditures in the United States because of 

tliis tariff threat. British lines do not want to build a market position 

and then lose it by arbitrary fiat at customs. Sir Miles with British 

(Please turn to page 200) 



12 



SPONSOR 



WHY WE BELIEVE IN 



RADIO AND TELEVISION 



because their primary function is to operate in 
the public interest. 

because they have become important cultural and social forces 
in our American way of life. 

More than 9 out of 10 American families are influenced by 
them every day. 

because they have given us, and our clients, two of the most 
useful of all media for selling people by telling people. 

There is no more intimate means of communication 
than the human voice. 

because in their unlimited future of 
spontaneous, educational, sales-producing 
entertainment . . . lies our future, too! 

FOOTE, CONE & BELDING 

NEW YORK . CHICAGO 

LOS ANGELES . HOLLYWOOD . SAN FRANCISCO 

HOUSTON 



14 JULY 1952 



13 




YOU 

CHOOSE 

CANADA'S 

FIRST 
STATION. 



Rthif S 



ale? u 



36.9* 



.local sales 

l/M 



up!csifljanl5% 

CFCF 

In 4k* U.S.^e.VeeJfrCk 

Im Cana^*, A||-Cawa*U. 




iripiiir 



Hurry P. Wtirmcstt 



Bayulc Cigars, 



President 
Inc., Philadelphia 



14 



Competitors refer to Harry Wurman as a "cigar expert," an 
accolade not given lightly. He started earning this industry respect 
27 years ago when he was commissioned by Bayuk to build the 
"largest, most modern cigar factory in the world." He did such a 
good job they asked him to take over as general production manager. 

Now 54, and president since 1947, Wurman has made Bayuk a 
leader with annual sales of over $30,000,000 for both 1950 and 1951. 
It places Bayuk with General Cigar and Consolidated Cigar. 

Behind this climb to the top is cigar-smoking Wurman's ability 
to mass produce quality cigars at low cost, utilize media effectively 
to sell them. To reach the cigar smoker — at one time a vanishing 
American — Wurman counts on air advertising to put his key brands, 
Phillies and Websters, into the impulse-purchase class. 

As early as 1938 Bayuk was building the foundations of its fast 
growth with California Sports Review on the Columbia Pacific net. 
This was followed by Inside of Sports on MBS. From 1938 to 1949, 
almost without interruption, radio introduced sports enthusiasts to 
the pleasures of cigar smoking. Sales burgeoned. 

Increased sales haven't lulled Wurman into a state of complacency. 
Ever on the lookout for something new, he thinks he's found it in 
The Adventures of Ellery Queen on 11 ABC TV stations (Wednes- 
day 9:00-9:30 p.m.). With about $600,000 of a $1,000,000 dollar 
budget going into the show Wurman feels "Bayuk will reach a new 
generation of cigar smokers, the men in their 20's and early 30's, 
and older smokers who might be induced to switch brands." 

Commercially, Ba\uk stars its Phillies brand, a \W cigar. Com- 
mercials consist of a cigar girl, and a quartet warbling "Treat your- 
self to Phillies 'cause they're super-mild, super-mild, super-mild. . . ." 
A 20-second film tag features Bayuk's Webster cigar with testimonials 
from well-known cigar smokers like Ned Sparks and Bobby Clark. 
Supplemental^ newspaper and magazine ads carry out the same 
theme (through Ellington \ Companj I. 

It's a far cry from point-of-sale cigar store Indian days to one of 
the biggest ad ventures ever carried out by a cigar maker. But 
Wurman doesn't blow smoke rings and daydream. Prime proof is the 
factor* he built in 1927. It's Mill the largest cigar plant under one 
roof. *** 

SPONSOR 



get the BACKING 

your sales may be LACKING 



Depend on WJBK's 

SALES PROMOTION DEPARTMENT 

to get you IN SOLID in the Detroit Market 



Want to know how effective your advertising is in 
Detroit? Want to know what competition is doing? 
Want dealer and distributor tie-ins in the Detroit 
area? Then call on WJBK's Sales Promotion De- 
partment! You'll get facts, backed by realistic 
research . . . aggressive, imaginative merchandising, 
backed by on-the-spot knowledge of the rich Detroit 
market. Yours to command . . . yours for bigger and 
better results on WJBK! 




Peter Storer 

Sales Promotion Manager 

From disc jockey to control engineer 
to public service director, Pete 
Storer has written a success story in 
all phases of radio. Formerly with 
Storer Broadcasting's WGBS, 
Miami, Pete moved to WJBK fol- 
lowing his graduation from Uni- 
versity of Miami. His success as 
WJBK's public service director 
made him a natural for the new job 
as sales promotion department head. 



A STORER STATION 
CBS and DUMONT Television . . . Tops in MUSIC, NEWS and SPORTS on Radio 



National Sales Mgr., TOM HARKER, 488 Madison, New York 22, ELDORADO 5-2455 

Represented Nationally by THE KATZ AGENCY 



14 JULY 1952 



15 




in prosperous, 
progressive 
Mobile . . . 



Met. Pop. — 




1940 1951 


% increase 


114,906 231,105 


101% 


Assessed 




prop. val. — 




$61,038,683 $148,747,991 


131% 



by using 



mm 



Call 

Adam Young, Jr. 

National Representative 

or 

F. E. Busby 

Cencral Manager 



ON THE DIAL710 




:bs 

Mobile, Alabama 




New Developments on SPONSOR Stories 

See: "Highballing with radio" 

Issue: 25 February 1952, p. 32 

^Object: New York Central railroad uses morn- 
ing men to boost business 

The New York Central is giving its summer rate reduction plan 
the greatest radio concentration it has ever devoted to one specific 
campaign, according to Harry Frier, N.Y.C. account executive at 
Foote, Cone & Belding. 

Along with 13 other railroads, N.Y.C. has reduced fares for family 
and group travel effective 25 June through 22 Octoher. The new 
"Family Fare Plan" is being plugged in about 40% of the commer- 
cials on all 15 stations currently on the N.Y.C. list. The commercials 
are delivered by the morning d.j.'s N.Y.C. buys to achieve a local- 
level personalized air approach. 

The 15 stations mentioned above actually represent an expansion 
of N.Y.C.'s radio schedule since sponsor's 25 February story ap- 
peared; four more stations with morning men have been added to 
the 11 SPONSOR listed. These additions are: WTOL, Toledo, Ken 
Lawrence; WHAM. Rochester, Mort Nusbaum: WAGE, Syracuse, 
Dean Harris; WXKW, Albany, Bill Hickok. All buys are 10 or 15- 
minute segments between 7:00 and 8:00 a.m., three to six days a week 
(per N.Y.C.'s usual broadcast policy). 

The special excursions which the railroad conducts as business 
boosters — and which are plugged by the morning d.j.'s — have been 
meeting with success on a big scale. In mid-May, two solid trainloads 
of people (about 1,400) were booked for a jaunt from Chicago to 
Niagara Falls. In April, the line hauled a record number of people 
on an excursion from Albany to the Flower Show in New York. 

Recently, the New York Central made use of its radio talent outside 
of a regularly scheduled program. On 15 June, Jim Conway, WBBM, 
Chicago, morning man, with other performers on his program, pre- 
sented an hour-and-a-half show at the Chicago railroad station. Oc- 
casion was the 50th Anniversary celebration of the 20th Century 
Limited, an event that had been well-promoted on Conway's a.m. show 



»ee: 




Issnc: 
Subject: 



"Toni's new radio campaign" 
13 March 1950, p. 18 

The Toni Company, heavy user of 
air media, announces record radio- 
TV lineup 

The recent addition of two radio shows brings to a record high 
the number of network radio and TV programs sponsored by the 
Toni Company, according to R. N. W. Harris, Toni president. To 
advertise its stable of hair products — Toni Home Permanent, Tonette 
{for children), Prom Permanent, White Rain Shampoo, Creme 
Shampoo. Creme Rinse. Bobbi Pin Curl — Toni appropriated some 
$6,000,000 in 1951; of this, about 50% went to radio, 10% to TV. 

Toni now sponsors (partly or fully) nine network shows. As of 1 
July, it is bankrolling Break the Bank over the ABC radio network, 
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11:30 a.m. Its It Happens Every Day show 
(five-minute "chat" with Arlene Francis and Bill Cullen) not only 
was expanded from one day a week to six on CBS radio (Monday 
through Friday, 4:00 p.m.. Saturday, 1:25 p.m.), but is now also 
heard on ABC radio (Tuesdays and Thursdays, 2:30 p.m.). 

A new TV panel show, I've Got A Secret, m.c.'d by Garry Moore, 
has replaced Crime Photographer on CBS-TV, alternate Thursdays, 
10:30 p.m. Other Toni shows are: This is Nora Drake, CBS radio; 
Arthur Godfrey Time, CBS radio; Arthur Godfrey and His Friends, 
CBS-TV; Kate Smith Show, NBC-TV; Grand Central Station, CBS 
radio; Warm-up Time, Mutual. 



16 



SPONSOR 



DON LEE'S 

RADIO AUDIENCES 

ARE SOARING, TOO! 

JAN.- FEB. 1952 vs. JAN. -FEB. 1949* 
Daytime audience 16.2% higher 
Evening audience 13.4% higher 

...and network rates are currently 
LOWER than the/ were in 1949! 

^Pacific Nielsen Ratings, Full network average 
audience, Monday thru Friday. 




DON LEE GIVES THE MOST COMPLETE, 
CONSISTENT, LOCAL COVERAGE OF 
THE PACIFIC COAST AT THE LOWEST 
COST PER SALES IMPRESSION 
OF ANY SALES MEDIUM 





The Nation's Greatest 
Regional Network 



DON LEE 



BROADCASTING SYSTEM 



1313 North Vine Street 
Hollywood 28, California 



Pacific Coast rail yards bustle with business, serving 
more than 14 million people who live in this vast 
323,866 square mile area. Only Don Lee can deliver 
your message clearly and consistently into each mar- 
ket from its own local network station. In addition to 
saturation, only Don Lee can offer you the flexibility 
of spotting your sales messages to your distribution 
pattern... with no waste. 

That's why Don Lee consistently carries more 
Pacific Coast regional business (with more regional 
shows in the top 10) than any other network. The ad- 
vertisers who know the Pacific Coast best also know 
the best Pacific Coast sales medium . . . Don Lee. 

Represented Nationally by John Blair & Company 




JVew and renew 



14 JULY 1952 



1. 



New on Television Networks 



2. 



3. 



SPONSOR 


AGENCY 


STATIONS 


PROGRAM, time, start, duration 


American Chicle Co. 


Dancer-Fitzgerald- 
Sample 


ABC -TV 


57 


A Date With Judy; Th 8-8:30 pm; 10 Jul; 13 wks 


American Chicle Co. 


Dancer-Fitzgcrald- 
Sample 


NBC-TV 


43 


Saturday Night Dance Party; Sat 10 min between 
9:30-10 pm; 5 Jul; 9 wks 


Campbell Soup Co 


Ward Wheelock 


CBS-TV 


40 


Double or Nothing; M, W, F 2-2:30 pm; 6 Oct; 
52 wks 


Colgate-Palmolive-Peet Co 


William Esty 


NBC-TV 




Big Payoff; Sun 8-9 pm; 22 |un; 13 wks 


Frank H. Fleer Corp 


Lewis & Gilman 


ABC-TV 


9 


Pud's Prize Party; Sat 11:30-45 am; 21 Jun; 

13 wks 
Footlights Theatre; F 9:30-10 pm 4 Jul 13 wks 


General Foods Corp 


Young & Rubicam 


CBS-TV 


26 


General Motors Corp 


Foote, Cone & Belding 


CBS-TV 


47 


Arthur Codfrey Time T, Th 10-10:15 am; 10 Jun; 


iFrigidaire div) 








8 wks 


Nestle Co Inc 


Sherman & Marquette 


NBC -TV 




Kate Smith Hour; M 4:45-5 pm; 8 Sep; 52 wks 


Serutan Co 


Franklin Bruck 


CBS-TV 


58 


Battle of the Ages; Sat 10:30-11 pm; 6 Sep; 52 

wks 
Life Begins at 80; F 9-9:30 pm; 11 Jul; 13 wks 


Serutan Co 


Franklin Bruck 


DuMont 


5 


Simmons Co 


Young & Rubicam 


CBS-TV 


29 


It's News To Me; alt F 10:30-11 pm; 3 Oct; 52 

wks 
Four Star Playhouse; alt Th 8:30-9 pm; 11 Sep; 


Singer Sewing Machine 


Young & Rubicam 


CBS-TV 


47 


Co 








52 wks 


Westinghouse Electric 


Ketchum MacLeod 


CBS-TV 


59 


Republican & Democratic National Conventions; 


Corp 


& Grove 






half-hour weekly; 6 Jul; 13 wks 



Renewed on Television Networks 




Station Representation Changes 



STATION 


AFFILIATION 


NEW NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 


KCOR, San Antonio 


Independent 


Richard O'Connell, N. Y. (40 E. 49th St.) 


KRSC, Seattle 


Independent 


George W. Clark Inc, N. Y. 


WCYB, Bristol, Va. 


Independent 


Gill-Keefe & Perna. N. Y. 


WEW, St. Louis 


Independent 


Cill-Keefe & Perna, N. Y. 


WMBG, Richmond 


NBC 


Boiling Co, N. Y. 


WSAZ, Huntington, W. Va. 


ABC 


Katz Agency, N. Y. 


WSCN, Birmingham 


Independent 


John Blair & Co, N. Y. 



In next issue: Netc and Renewed on Networks. Netc National Spot Radio Business, 
National Broadcast Sales Executives, Sponsor Personnel, ISeiv Agency Appointments 






Numbers alter names 
refer to New and Re- 
new category 



V. P. Black 


(5) 


W. S. Roberts 


(5) 


John /■'. Reeder 


(5) 


John E. Wosman 




P. E. Harder 


(5) 



14 JULY 1952 



19 



14 JULY 1952 



\eir and renew 






*** 




4. 



New and Reneived Spot Television 



SPONSOR 


AGENCY 


NET OR STATION 


PROGRAM, time, start, duration 


American Chicle Co 


Dancer-Fitzgerald- 
Sample 


WPTZ, Phila. 


1-min anncmt; 6 Jul; 26 wks <r) 




American Maize-Products 

Co 
Borden Co 


Kenyon & Eckhardt 


WBZ-TV, Boston 


1-min partic; 3 Jul; 13 wks ir) 




Young & Rubicam 


WNBT, N. Y. 


20-sec stn break; 30 Jun; 52 wks 


(r) 


Borden Co 


Young & Rubicam 


WPTZ, Phila. 


20-sec stn break; 4 Jul: 52 wks (i 


) 


C. N. Coughlan Co 


Lewin, Williams & 

Saylor 
Young & Rubicam 


WDTV, Pittsb. 


1-min partic; 25 Jun; 5 wks (n) 




General Foods Corp 


WNBT, N. Y. 


1-min partic; 4 Jul; 13 wks <r) 




General Foods Corp 


Benton & Bowles 


WDTV. Pittsb. 


1-min partic; 8 Jul: 26 al» wks 


in> 


Lever Brothers Co 


J. Walter Thompson 


WNBQ, Chi.; 


20-sec stn break; 30 Jun; 26 wks 


(r) 


Lever Brothers Co 


|. Walter Thompson 


KNBH, Hlywd. 


20-sec stn Break; 30 Jun; 27 wks 


(r) 


Lever Brothers Co 


J. Walter Thompson 


WNBT, N. Y. 


20-sec stn break; 30 jun; 27 wks 


(r) 


Lever Brothers Co 


j. Walter Thompson 


WBZ-TV, Boston 


20-sec stn break; 4 Jul; 26 wks 


(r) 


Philip Morris Cr Co 


Biow 


WDTV, Pittsb. 


1-min partic; 6 Aug; 20 wks <nl 




Procter 6 Camble Co 


Dancer-Fitzgerald- 










Sample 


WRCB, Schen. 


1-min partic; 1 Jul; 52 wks 




Rapidol Distributing Corp 


Dowd, Redfield & 










Johnstone 


WBZ-TV, Boston 


1-min anncmt; 5 Jul; 13 wks ir) 




Ronson Art Metal Works 


Crey 








Inc 




WNBT, N. Y. 


20-sec stn break; 1 Jul; 27 wks 


(r) 


Ronson Art Metal Works 


Crey 




20-sec stn break; 3 Jul; 26 wks 


(r) 


Inc 




WRBC, Schen. 






Standard Brands Inc 


Compton 


WPTZ, Phila. 


20-sec stn break; 5 Jul; 52 wks 


(r) 


United Air Lines 


N. W. Ayer 


WNBQ, Chi. 


20-sec stn break; 4 Jul 13 wks 


ir) 


United Fruit Co 


BBDO 


WNBT. N. Y. 


1-min partic 8 Jul 13 wks (r> 





5. 



Ailvertising Agency Personnel Changes 

NAME FORMER AFFILIATION 



Cordon Agnew 
Mary Andrew Ayres 
Vincent P. Black 
E. L. Deckinger 
Marvin H. Frank 
Porter E. Harder 
Anderson F. Hewitt 
William E. John Jr 
Richard L. Linkroum 
Ross McKee 
Rod McKenzie 
Toby A. Miller 
John E. Mosman 
David Ogilvy 
John F. Reeder 

Wilfred S. Roberts 
Lusk Robinson 
Leonard H. Russell 

Cuy S. Warren Jr 
Earl Wennergren 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Radio-TV consultant, N. Y. 

SSCB. N. Y., acct exec 

Perfex Corp., Milwaukee vp, mgr controls div 

Biow. N. Y., research dir 

W B. Doner, Chi., exec vp 

BBDO. Mnpls . acct exec 

Hewitt. Ogilvy, Benson & Mather, N. Y., pres 

Rutin. uitt & Ryan, N. Y., acct exec 

CBS, N. Y., prod-dir 

Cecil 6 Presbrey, N. Y., acct exec 

Sherman & Marquette, N. Y., acct exec 

Ted Ball, L. A., gen mgr 

Biow, N. Y. , vp 

Hewitt, Ogilvy, Benson & Mather, N. Y., 

William H. Weintraub, N. Y., acct exec 

plans board 
Pedlar & Ryan, N. Y.. radio-tv head 
Advertising sis, sis prom 
Young 6 Rubicam, N. Y. , research operations 

superv 
D. P. Brother & Co, Detroit, acct exec 
William Kostka, Denver 



sr vp 
member 



Ben Sackheim, N. Y., radio-tv dir 

Same, vp 

Grant, Detroit, vp 

Same, research vp 

Same, pres 

Foote, Cone & Belding, S. F., acct exec 

Same, board chairman, chief exec officer 

Crant, N. Y., acct exec, superv 

Cever, Newell & Canger, N. Y., exec prod 

SSCB, N. Y., exec 

Same, vp, acct superv 

Edwards, L. A., merchandising dir 

Harry B. Cohen, N. Y. , radio-tv vp 

Same, pres 

Benton & Bowles, N. Y., vp, acct superv 

Benton & Bowles, N. Y.. tv prod 

White. Tulsa, acct exec 

Warwick 6 Legler. N. Y.. research dir 

Same, vp 

MacGruder-Bakewell-Kostka, Denver, radio dir 



6. 



Station Changes (other than personnel) 

KCLF, Clifton, Ariz., formerly LBS, now ABC 
KCAN, Kingman, Ariz., formerly LBS, now ABC 
KCPH, Flagstaff, Ariz., formerly LBS, now ABC 
KTBB, Tyler, Tex., formerly LBS, now ABC 
WARN, Ft. Pierce, Fla., formerly LBS, now ABC 
WBCU, Union, S. C, formerly MBS, now ABC 
WDWD, Dawson, Ca., formerly LBS, now ABC 
WCRA, Cairo. Ca., formerly LBS, now ABC 
WIKC, Bogalusa, La., formerly MBS. now NBC 
WLBE, Leesburg, F!a., formerly LBS, now MBS 
WMAW, Milwaukee, call letters changed to WCAN 
WTMC, Ocala, Fla., formerly MBS, now NBC 
WVOP, Vidalia, Ca., formerly LBS, now MBS 




Numbers after names 
refer to New and Re- 
new category 

R. L. Linkroum (5) 

E. L. Deckinger (5) 

Rod McKenzie <5) 

Gordon Agnew ( 5 

Lusk Robinson (5) 



W. E. John Jr 
L. II. Russell 
M. A. Ayres 
A. F. Hewitt 
David Ogilvy 



20 




More 




WHO 




Dear Mr. Slielley : 

These few lines are just a "Thank 
You" note for the article concerning our 
son, Robert, which you received and so 
kindly sent on to us. I had thought of 
writing to you for this but didn't know 
whether you kept these articles on file 
or destroyed them after they were used. 
Bob is our only son and has been over 
in Korea since the beginning of the War. 

And since I've never had any special 
reason for writing to WHO before I'm 
going to take this opportunity to tell 
you how much our family enjoys your 
station and it's the station most often 
listened to in our home. We can even 
tell when a strange announcer's voice 
is heard. We enjoy all your entertain- 
ment and what I wouldn't give to be 
able to play the piano like Bill Austin, 
sing like the "Chore Gang" and that 
guy, Gene Godt and his witticism. I'll 
bet his wife could choke him some- 
times. We even like the chuckles he 
provokes from the fellows in the stu- 
dio. To make a long story short we 
just enjoy all of WHO. Only one thing 
that we haven't heard for a long time 
that we enjoyed a great deal, Jack Ker- 
rigan's singing. The last we heard of 
him he was in the office, too. 

My "Thank You" has gotten quite 
lengthy but did want you to know how 
much we appreciated your thought- 
fulness. 

Mr. & Mrs. Thos. McClelland 
Madrid, la. 

Dear Mr. Loyet: 

This letter is to express the apprecia- 
tion of the Iowa Milk Dealers Associa- 
tion and Association of Ice Cream Manu- 
facturers of Iowa for the fine program 
conducted by Herb I'lambeck on your 
Radio Station WHO. 

We appreciate the fact that Mr. Plam- 
beck evidently took a considerable 
amount of time to make a study of our 
industry which was so interesting and 
so capably explained during his broad- 
cast Wednesday morning, May 17th. 

Thanks again for the splendid co- 
operation your Radio Station has given 
the Iowa Industry. 

John H. Brock way 

Executive Secretary 
Association of Ice Cream Manufacturers 
Des Moines, Iowa 

Dear Sirs : 

This is to tell you how high we rate 
WHO above all other stations especially 
for News. We left our home at Greene, 
la. last June & have been in Miss., Mon- 
tana, Wash., Oreg., Calif., full length, 
then here in very south of Texas. We 
couldn't get you on the West Coast & 
surely were delighted to hear you here. 
We heard the basket ball broadcasts & 
scores on billboard often & were on the 
night our Marble Rock won over Allison 



to take tournament. Many lowans here 
& all are anxious for the weather items 
at 10:15 P.M. often cold there & 92° 
here during day. This is a nice place. 
Very pretty country — 

Mr. and Mrs. Galen R. Gates 
Val Verde Motel, Dorma, Texas 

To WHO-all! 

I am determined to write you a letter 
right now, and do you s'pose I can find 
any paper? 

But I just wanted to greet each and 
every one of you and thank you for the 
joy you have given us this past year 
thru WHO!! 

Herb Plambeck, Gene Godt — oh what 
a kick I get out of your humorous 
episodes! We sure enjoyed the WHO 
kids' hour Saturday! Bud Hovland & 
Lucia congrats on baby! Jack Shelly — 
Song fellows — We love you! In fact we 
love. all of you down there. 
From all of us 

Samuel (11) 
Karl (10) 
Peter (9) 
Tom (8) 
Miriam (4) 
Knute (11 mo.) 
Olaf & Bernice Watne 
Gait, Iowa 



Dear Mr. Shelley: 

I wish t<> express my appreciation for 
the emergency broadcast announced by 
your station today on the 12:30 News 
to locate me. My family had been try- 
ing since last night to reach me to 
inform me of the death of a member 
of my family. 

A friend in Marshalltown heard the 
broadcast and told me on my arrival 
there this afternoon. Many thanks for 
your trouble and kindness. 

Yours very truly, 
L. R. Binder 
Des Moines, Iowa 

Gentlemen : 

This is a note of appreciation in be- 
half of the thirty-eight churches in the 
Presbytery of lies Moines for airing 
the Presbyterian New-, of our General 
Assembly meeting at Cincinnati, Ohio. 

We wish to thank the sponsors of the 
Lowell Thomas program Cor relinquish- 
ing their time so that the more than 
9800 members of our denomination in 
this presbytery might have the oppor- 
tunity of hearing the highlights of the 
Assembly. 

Sincerely yours, 

Harold S. Gilleney 

Stated Clerk 
Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. 
Presbytery of Des Moines 



/Ts a sophisticated, big-city advertising man, it may be 
difficult for you to realize what WHO means in Iowa Plus. 

Day in and day out, our mailbags are jammed with 
personal letters of friendship and confidence - "stamp- 
of-approval" evidence, from your customers, that WHO 
is giving a unique radio service to the millions of 
people in Iowa Plus. 

WIKI© 

+ /or Iowa PLUS + 

Des Moines . . . 50,000 Watts 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 
P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 
FREE & PETERS, INC., National Representatives 




14 JULY 1952 



21 



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WORLD sets the pace by 
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WKOP. 3inghamton, N. Y. 
Wally Buman, 
Program Director 



"We've found that 
WORLD, plus production 
on the local level, spells 
SALES!" 

KMOD. Modesto, California 
Gene D'Accardo, 
Program Director 



"WORLD makes a world 
of difference in program- 
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is no idle statement. On 
the contrary, it falls far 
short of appraising the im- 
provement that has re- 
sulted since subscribing to 
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WBBC, Flint, Michigan 
W. Eldon Garner, 
General Manager 



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KEYS, Corpus Christi, Texas 
Ben F. Blackmon, Jr., 
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WALTER HUSTON 



ROBERT MONTGOMERY 




THE THREE SUNS 




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RAY BLOCH 



WRITE, WIRE OR PHONE WORLD TODAY 
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TV 



by Bob Foreman 



T. 



he subject of film reruns — that 
i>. second showings of TV pro- 
grams — is fraught with interest, 
moment, and controversy. 

There are those individuals who 
flatly state it is an imposition on 
the public and a misappropriation 
of the advertiser's funds to allow 
any film a second chance (unless it 
be some special classic with a sea- 
sonal tradition such as the Amos 
'n Andy Christmas radio show or 
Lionel Barrymore's Old Scrooge. 

Ben Duffy of BBDO, whose 
opinion is usually valued in adver- 
tising quarters, has a dislike of re- 
runs in general. He bucks them 
when contemplated for some cli- 
ents, saying that they would be 
considered as shopworn merchan- 
dise. 

But even he will concede that 
there are times and places where 
the second run can have its day. 
For example, as an economy. The 
price of a rerun is lower, of course. 
than the original showing. 

As a case in point. The Best of 
Groucho films will be given a sec- 
ond chance this summer, and I 
dare say even those who caught 
these specific programs which were 
selected from two years of broad- 
casting will welcome the review. 

I also might add that recently I 
had Mr. Duffy nodding (from per- 
suasiveness, not from boredom, I 
hope ) when I argued further about 
reruns as follows: 

Any repeat has a vast new audi- 
ence available to it. Let's say 
you've a top-rating opus like Fire- 
side Theatre. You're averaging a 
line 35 rating in a big list of mar- 
kets. This means that 65% of the 
people with TV sets never saw your 
-how first time around. Now then 
— consider what's happened in 
those 50 or 60 markets during the 



past six to 12 months since these 
specific shows were aired. New 
sets were added by the thousands. 
Twenty-four per cent more of 'em 
in the New York City viewing area 
alone meaning that of the 124% 
people now available, 89% of them 
( 65%-(- 24%) have never seen the 
^hows before. And that even be- 
comes a higher figure when you 
add to your potential audience the 
folks who liked your show enough 
when they first viewed it to want 
another showing. 

So the rerun, far from being the 
bane of the industry and an alba- 
tross about the viewer's neck, be- 
comes one way out of the high cost 
of TV-programing-on-film. 

The simple expedient of chang- 
ing the main title from Fireside 
Theatre t6*the Gruber Toothpaste 
Playhouse or the Eighth National 
Bank's Show Window makes it 
possible for a local advertiser with 
a strictly limited budget (or a na- 
tional advertiser buying locally) 
to present TV programs of top 
duality in any market he so de- 
sires. 

How soon after the film has run 
for its original sponsor it should 
be permitted to crop up again, re- 
titled and fortified with a new set 
of commercials for another prod- 
uct is a matter of opinion — ooin- 
ion that's usually divided and of- 
ten heated. A dramatic program 
without continuing characters 
would not in any sense compete 
with itself if run again within a 
year of its original showing. On 
the other side of the coin, shows 
like / Love Lucy and Groucho with 
their very dramatic essence depen- 
dent on one or two people present 
a different problem. Were these 
allows to crop up as reruns for oth- 
er sponsors, I'm sure they'd work 



against the original advertiser. 
That's because the millions who 
like the stars now r have to wait un- 
til Monday and Thursday to see 
their favorites — or do without 'em. 
But put a rerun on Wednesday or 
Saturday or even later the same 
evening, and you lessen more dras- 
tically the insistence of tuning in 
to the Philip Morris and DeSoto 
offerings. 

All these items are coming to 
the fore these days and are being 
discussed fully. From smoke-filled 
rooms will come the decisions and 
formulae which will, I'm certain, 
resolve the problems. 

But in the meantime, the rooms 
are getting smokier and the discus- 
sions louder. Even though things 
are a bit trying, it's a joy to be in 
at the genesis of this whole dog- 
gone thing as we all are. 



commercial reviews 



/ TELEVISION 

SPONSOR: Diff Hand Cleaner 
agkncy:* Birmingham, Castleman, & 

Pierce, Inc., N. Y. 
PROGRAM: Station identifications 

The subject of station identifications 
has long fascinated me (as anyone who 
leads these perorations must realize) be- 
cause in the most limited of time slots 
they can and must tell a complete as well 
as compelling advertising story. They 
may employ live motion, opticals, anima- 
tion or any of the other film devices avail- 
able to make their point, yet all the while 
they have to devote part of their visual 
field and audio time to the television sta- 
tion so it can identify itself. Furthermore, 
these spots are still available (usually) ad- 
jacent to real high rating shows making 
them all the more valuable to the adver- 
tiser who can use them adroitly. 

This preface brings me to the ID which 
I caught one morning for Diff Hand 
Cleaner, and for my money (which it real- 
ly isn't, of coarse) I'd say that here is a 
model usage of the time-buy. It's simple, 
forceful, direct and has just enough mo- 
tion to rivet the viewer's mind without 
confusing it. 

The effect is created simply by opening 
with :a three-shot of (a) the Diff pack- 



24 



SPONSOR 



No Contest 




Between the 
Rating Services 
in Houston! 

Houston's First PULSE REPORT 
(April -May 1952) Confirms 
HOOPERATINGS through many years 



KPRC is FIRST 



KPRC 

Network Station B 
Network Station C 
Network Station D 



By APRIL- 


-MAY 


PULSE REPORT, TOO! 


Daytime Va Hours 

8:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M. 
Monday through Friday 


Nighttime '2 Hours 

Monday 
through Sunday 


26 


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HOUSTON 



K?^ ■;;-„.....■ 

N etw° rK c 

above N S ,at.o« 

60* abOVC Ne twor k Stonon 



31.6* 



NBC and TQN 
on the Gulf Coast 
JACK HARRIS, 

General Manager 

Nationally represented by 
EDWARD PETRY and CO. 




14 JULY 1952 



25 



FOR AN ALL-MAINE MARKET 
MeBS RADIO IS CHEAPER... 




LETS LOOK AT COVERAGE AND COSTS: 

Eight Maine daily newspapers offer aggregate cir- 
culation of 245,456.* 

MeBS — three stations — offers more than 260,000 ra- 
dio homes. (Plus multiple-set homes and car radios.) 

A quarter page, for example, in eight Maine dailies 
costs about $675 (flat rate). Same space in Maine's 
two largest papers (one a morning-evening combina- 
tion) costs more than $250. 

CONSIDER NOW THESE 
MeBS QUARTER HOUR FEATURES: 

PETE TULLY, political news analyst (Friday eve- 
nings) costs $230 (one-time rate). 

STATE EDITION, news and editorial highlights 
(Sunday afternoons) costs $150. 

For more modest budgets, participation may be 
bought in either of above weekly programs at far 
less cost. Ask for rates on these, or for participation 
in top-rated Maine Network News Service, or Maine 
Farm Topics with Jake Brofee. 

I Consumer Markets 1951-1952/ 




MAINE 

BROADCASTING 

SYSTEM 



WCSH 

PORTLAND 



WRDO 

AUGUSTA 



WLBZ 

BANGOR 



REPRESENTED BY 



WEED 8 COMPANY, Nal, anally 
BERTHA BANNAN, New England 



age, (b) a pair of dirty hands in close-up 
held palms out. As the audio describes 
the hand-cleaning action of Diff, a slow 
match dissolve takes place during which 
the same hands turn clean. Easy, huh? 
And a most skillful use of an optical to 
give motion while creating a relevant 
effect! 



sponsor: 

AGENCY: 
PROGRAM : 



RADIO 

Social Security 
WICC, Bridgeport 
Announcements 



In order to give this series of critiques 
an international flavor, may I mention one 
which I caught on station WICC in 
Bridgeport, Conn., while I was driving 
down from the stix (Westport) the other 
morning. 

It began with the ring of a telephone 
and was followed by a girl's voice stating 
that she was "your Bridgeport Social Se- 
curity agent." From there she went into a 
straight dissertation on the fact that vet- 
erans' benefits should be investigated at the 
following telephone number. The phone 
number was repeated several times. 

The announcement was short, to the 
point, and well produced. I bring this an 
nouncement up mainly to point out the 
fact that it's most encouraging to see i 
government agency putting across its mes- 
sage with the very same sales techniques 
that advertisers have long found to be suc- 
cesful. It's comforting to see business 
getting into government these days. 



sponsor: 

agency: 

program: 



Self-seal Envelopes 

S. R. Leon Co., Inc., N. Y. 

Announcements 



Recently I saw this capsule drama on the 
WNBT local cut-in during the Garroway 
opus and found that it most graphically 
revealed the virtues of envelopes that 
needn't be licked to keep them private. 
Henry Fonda was the protagonist and his 
histrionic abilities made it possible for the 
advertiser to present his story in dialogue 
so that the copy sounded both believable 
and informal. 

The close-up insert of the way to seal 
the product is done effectively and convinc- 
ingly. Good use of star and excellent cam- 
era work on this product again point out 
TV's tremendous value as a demonstra- 
tion ad-medium. 



26 



SPONSOR 



This is Milwaukee 




dominates 



flMffeftMMnta*'. 



■ ' 



% . * 






and here's why: 

Wisconsin folks make it a habit to keep tuned to WTMJ. 
Year in, year out, more people in Milwaukee and Wisconsin 
listen to WTMJ than any other radio station. 

WTMJ's primary coverage blankets the wealthy Wisconsin 
market . . . 628,916 of Wisconsin's total of 968,253 radio 
homes. 

30 years of radio service to the people of Milwaukee and 
Wisconsin has won a steady, loyal listenership for WTMJ, 
listenership that pays off in sales results. That's why Ameri- 
ca's leading advertisers continue to renew radio schedules on 
WTMJ. 

Get complete, up-to-the-minute sales facts. Contact your 
Henry I. Christal representative. He has facts and figures 
to show you how and why WTMJ dominates in Milwaukee 
... in Wisconsin. 




THE MILWAUKEE JOURNAL RADIO STATION 



t 





5,000 WATTS • 620 KC • 


NBC 






^k 










Represented by 


THE HENRY 1. 


CHRISTAL CO. New 


York • 


Ch 


icago 



That's what she hi ote. 

Seems she and her retired husband spent 
most oi their waking hours listening 
to kens, but Ion ih! one day the) couldn't 
hear us because ol "noise and interference." 
Being a direct sort, the little old lady 
sat down and wrote some very pointed 
letters to our sponsors. Like this . . . 

"kcbs has the best <uul most of the programs 
toe enjoy .. .but it was almost impossible 
to brin (iangbusters tonight!" 

"II \<>u gentlemen cannot help I'll go higher!' 

"As one American to another I am pleading 
with yon h> do what yon can, for this is 
really desperate with me!" 



I mi igued, we sent an engineer to ( he< k up. 
He found the trouble in some faulty 
neighborhood wiring and that was that. 
But while he was at it he ran standard field 
strength measurements which showed 
kcbs roaring through the living room with 
<h millivolts. 

\ow everybody's happy. 

We cherish the incident because this coupl 
is probably the only one of out t ,093,250 
families to feel desperate about us. 
1 he othei 1,093,249 families just prefer us. 
and listen to 50,000-watt KCBS more than 
to any other station.* 

CBS Hniliii in Northern California JvvDj 
San Francisco ■ Represented by CBS Radio Spot Sales 



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What's New in Research? 



30 



V. V. Telepulse breakdown of programing bg tgpe 
shows 20.8% of time taken up bg feature films 

Jan-June, 1951 Jan-June, 1952 

PROGRAM TYPES #'/ 4 Hours Avg. Rating #V 4 Hours Avg. Raring 

Feature films 3,425 3.1 2,360 3.5 

Women's interest* .... .... 1,572 2.2 

Kid Shows 1.139 6.3 1,313 6.5 

Westerns, Serials 1,047 4.0 1,017 4.7 

l\ews 842 3.3 528 3.7 

Daytime variety 793 4.6 

Home making-service 783 1.6 

Quiz-Audience participation 778 5.6 882 4.9 

Interviews 752 3.0 344 3.7 

Drama & Mysteries 632 13.6 496 15.4 

Film shorts 579 1.9 545 1.8 

Musical variety 447 5.6 901 4.4 

Comedy variety 324 22.3 784 12.8 

Forums & Discussions 322 2.5 212 3.7 

Boxing 277 7.8 287 8.1 

Wrestling 205 2.8 411 4.3 

Education & Science 204 2.2 174 2.9 

Mime 199 2.6 255 3.1 

Comedy situation 180 13.9 133 12.0 

Religion 179 2.5 89 6.1 

Serial stories 178 5.9 60 3.6 

Sports news 168 3.6 90 3.7 

Basketball 165 6.2 98 6.3 

Test pattern & Music or JSews 146 .3 293 .6 

Baseball 130 12.4 315 10.4 

Talent 126 12.3 118 11.2 

Racing 43 10.2 48 3.4 

Hockey 35 3.9 

Roller Derby 34 6.1 99 6.1 

Cancer telethon 27 10.3 

Rodeo 

Politics 23 5.9 

United Nations 22 3.5 

Bowling 20 1.7 

Polo match 16 2.3 

Soft ball 

Mr. & Mrs 10 .7 76 1.4 

Misc. sports 5 1.7 

President Truman 2 41.3 

Miscellaneous 284 1.5 307 3.0 

TOTAL 14,541 14,007 

* Since July 1951 this category has been divided into "Homemaking-Serviee" and 

"Daytime Variety" 
Source: New York Telepulse Reports 

Comment: Regardless of the fact that New York is the originating point for 
four networks, 20.8% of the programing time on the city's six stations is de- 
voted, according to the above tabulation, to feature films. Comparison of the 
two six-month periods also shows that 45% more quarter hours were consumed 
by feature films this year than the previous year. Still other conspicuous trends 
are indicated by the increase in the number of quarter hours of programing for 
newscasts, forums, situation comedies, soap operas, mysteries, and dramas. 

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on its 30th anniversai 
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dedicated the world 
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On its 30th anniversary of broadcasting, WCAU opened the 
doors of its great new radio and television center with the finest 
facilities in the world. Here is the ultimate in electronic achieve- 
ment, which will result in great advancements in the programming 
of news, entertainment, education, and service to the community. 

There's everything at hand to increase our ability to produce 
the best local programs in Philadelphia and to further our reputation 
for creating shows for the CBS network. 

We could not dedicate such a building without considering the 
responsibility it presents. Ours is a powerful voice . . . and ours is 
the precious American heritage of free speech. Both must be carefully 
safeguarded. Therefore, this great building is dedicated to the 
people in this area that we serve, with the pledge that WCAU and 
WCAU-TV will always be "Speaking for Freedom." 



HE PHILADELPHIA BULLETIN RADIO AND TELEVISION STATIONS 



SPEAKING FOR FREEDOM 




PULLING 
POWER 

That Is Unrivaled 




You Need 



WHEN 

TELEVISION 
TOO! 



WHEN TELEVISION enjoys 
constant viewer preference, 
developed from sound pro- 
gramming and smart merchan- 
dising. 

Central New York's rich market 
rs reached best through WHEN. 
When buying television, 

say "WHEN" 

CENTRAL NEW YORK'S MOST 
LOOKED AT TELEVISION STATION 

Represented Nationally 
By the KATZ AGENCY 

CBS • ABC • DUMONT 

(WHEN 

J TELEVISION 

i umwsE, 

^■ I' HJWXHJ-Ji..-.. ---■■'-■■---• ' 

A MEREDITH TV STATION 

34 




agency profile 



Adrian Samish 



Radio-TV v.p. 
Dancer, Fitzgerald & Sample 

When an agency's client list includes such super air-conscious ad- 
vertisers as General Mills. Proctor & Gamble, Campbell Soup, Ameri- 
can Chicle, Fallstaff Beer, and Sterling Drug, you know that the 
radio-TV department has to function constantly on all cylinders. 
Heading up the program end of this complex operation at DFS is 
radio-TV v.p. Adrian Samish. 

In his five years at DFS, Samish has witnessed TV's ascendancy. 
Says Ade, "We have to use TV for our clients in order to continue 
to reach much of the same audience we used to reach on radio. For 
introducing new products (or established products in new markets) 
TV has demonstrated an ability to get sales much faster than radio 
ever could." 

One advantage of working with "blue chip" accounts is that econo- 
mies can be effected by long-range planning. Says Samish, "We use 
a considerable number of filmed shows on TV in order to stretch the 
clients advertising dollar. With our type of advertiser we can con- 
tract for an extensive series of each show we select. For example, 
there are 78 installments of Lone Ranger in the can, 52 of the Stu 
Erwin Shoiv, and an equal number of the Beulah program. When 
you turn a producer loose on a program of that size he can effect 
many economies." 

"What's more." Samish continues, "we can put on at least a year's 
supply of programs before starting reruns. In addition to the basic 
economy of using the same film again, we get excellent ratings on 
reruns, in some cases even higher than on initial showings." 

Much of Ade Samish's savvy in radio-TV production is the result 
of his diversified training. Family conditions forced him to get out 
and hustle after two years of high school. He started in show busi- 
ness as office boy to Monte Proser, New York nightclub operator; 
did some songwriting for the Shuberts and learned stage manage- 
ment under producer Chester Erskine. 

Ade made his advertising debut with Arthur Kudner's agency 
where he directed the True Story program for a year and a half. He 
joined Y & R as a producer and director, remaining there eight years. 
The next four years were spent at ABC as v.p. in charge of radio-TV 
programing. Samish came to DFS in his present capacity in 1947. 

In addition to his wife and two children, Samish's Bedford Valley 
acres arc shared with a keimclfull ot boxers, which he breeds, raises 
and shows. * * * 

SPONSOR 



All It Took was an Appetite... 



... To earn Jonah an unusual cruise. 

But you just can't keep a good man down, whether he be a Prophet or a radio 
personality! 

The Omaha, Council Bluffs area has a "whale of an appetite" too, for the fare 
dished out by KOWH's eight top radio personalities. Seeing's believing, so get a 
load of the below Hooper share-of-audience averaged for October, 1951 -May, 
1952, 8 A.M. -6 P.M., Monday through Saturday! 

36.3 % 








Largest total audience of any 
Omaha station, 8 A.M. to 6 
P.M., Monday through Satur- 
day! (Hooper, Oct., 1951 thru 
May, 1952.) 



Largest share of audience, in 
any individual tune period, ot 
any independent station in all 
America! (May, 1952.) 



Sta. "A" 



Sta. "B' 



OTHER 
STATION RATINGS 



Sta. "C 



Sta. "D' 



Sto. "E" 



_□. 



iffilf 



O M A 



General Manager, Todd Storz; Represented National!/ By The BOLLING CO. 



.dependent Station" 



Serving the Community Well 

without regard for reward 

rewards the servant richly 

with the Community's Regard 



Recent Telecasts in the Community Interest: 



EXPERIMENTAL TELECASTS OF MINNE- 
APOLIS SYMPHONY: The series earned a 
Pulse rating of 1 9 . . . on Saturday 
afternoons ! 



FIRST PUBLIC SCHOOL INSTRUCTION ON 
TELEVISION: When a janitors' strike 
closed schools during a winter semester 
. . . children watched teachers on TV, 
worked out lessons, sent them in. First 
such instruction in the United States. 
Entire programs planned and executed 
by school system. We supplied Channel 
4 and technicians. 



A MILE-LONG CHRISTMAS GREETING 
SCROLL TO JAPANESE SCHOOL CHILDREN: 

St. Paul and Minneapolis boys and 
girls were sold the idea just before 
Christmas. Whole schools were tele- 
vised signing the scroll . . . which was 
flown to Tokyo. 

TELEVISION USED FOR MASS INDUCTION 
OF 20,000 MEMBERS OF SCHOOL PATROL: 

Police officials conducted ceremony 
while school patrol units took oath 
watching the TV screen in schools. 



t0& 






CBS • ABC • DUMONT (Affiliate) 



Nationally represented by FREE & PETERS 




ST. PAUL 
MINNEAPOLIS 



36 



SPONSOR 



How to use 
this issue 

Chart at right is 

your i nl rod m* I ion to 
1952 Fall Facts 



r T guide readers through the thou- 
sands of facts which appear on the 
236 pages of this sixth annual Fall 
Facts edition, sponsor herewith pre- 
sents a chart capsuling the issue's high- 
lights. It is designed as a quick intro- 
duction to what is the largest issue in 
sponsor's history. 

As the chart indicates, there are 
eight major Fall Facts sections: Net- 
work Radio; Spot Radio; Radio 
Basics; Network TV; Spot TV; Tele- 
vision Basics; General (including film 
and miscellaneous topics); and Inter- 
national Basics. Each of these major 
sections is further divided under con- 
venient headings and most of the text 
is in quick-reading, question-and-an- 
swer style. 

This issue is intended as a tool for 
buyers of air advertising to use in 
making immediate fall decisions and 
throughout the year to come. It con- 
tains two kinds of information, basic- 
ally: (1) industry trends and (2) re- 
search facts and figures about the air 
media. In the Network Radio section, 
for example, is an analysis of the out- 
look for a rate cut by this fall. In each 
of the three Basics sections are dozens 
of charts and graphs summing up the 
dimensions and characteristics of com- 
mercial radio and TV in the U.S. and 
throughout the world. 

You'll want to keep this issue handy 
as a reference and reprints of each of 
the Basics sections as well as sponsor's 
TV map in color will be available to 
subscribers requesting them. 



Turn page for summary of 
key radio-TV fall trends 



14 JULY 1952 




Highlights of Major Features in This Issue 



SECTION 




radio 
BASICS 




( spct TV J 



television 
BASICS 



general 

(with TV film) 



international 
BASICS 



MAIN USE TO YOU 



Sums up rate cut outlook, trend 
in fall programing, show prices, 
ways you can buy nets today; 
includes available net shows list 



Pinpoints availabilities picture, 
what will happen to station 
rates in fall, trend to increased 
activity in station merchandising 

14 pages of charts covering 
radio's dimensions, listening 
habits, costs; provides answers 
to virtually any factual ques- 
tion about the medium 



Tells how much costs are going 
up for fall, how latecomers can 
get into TV; includes available 
net shows list and television 
map of the U.S. 



Covers your chances of getting 
better availabilities now, rates; 
describes how reps, buyers 
work to standardize I D.'s 



Charted are sets by markets, 
average ratings and cost-per- 
1,000's by show types, plus 
dozens of other TV fundamentals 



Rundown on TV film trends and 
lists of film shows, producers, 
syndicators make up first por- 
tion of section. Also covered 
here are research, miscellane- 
ous topics 



Four pages of charts sum up 
commerical radio-TV abroad; in- 
cludes world map of all nations 
having commercial stations 



STARTS ON 



Page 43 



Page 65 



Page 99 



Page 131 



Page 155 



Page 169 



Page 185 



Page 227 




Transit Radio which puts FM music and commercials 
busses, is ready for expansion to more markets now that it 
has licked Ms opponents in Supreme Court. For details on 
sponsors who have bought Transit Radio see puge i) I 



Booming now that radio nets have slowed programing efforts are transcrip- 
tion firms. Reports of increased business are universal with Ziv's "I Was a 
Communist for the FBI" one of season's big hits. Man above is ex-FBI 
agent on whose life story Ziv based its half-hour program .VC»t» fHiae 7H 



Every phase of air advertising changing 
more rapidly than in any previous fall 



Never before in the history of air ad- 
vertising have so many things been 
happening so quickly. In every branch 
of the business, evolution is on the 
move. A complete picture of all of 
these changes is painted under appro- 
priate section headings in the pages 
that follow. But here is an over-all 



look at the key radio-TV trends de- 
signed to tie some of the Fall Facts 
issue strands together. 

(The pictures appearing on these 
pages give you an illustrated sampling 
of trends and topics covered exten- 
sively elsewhere. ) 

The story of air advertising for fall 



Questions about UHF television are in minds of many advertisers and station people. Here 
FCC Commissioner George Sterling explains phases of TV allocations to several broadcasters at 
recent Maryland-DC Broadcasters meeting. Shown from I. to r. are Tony Provost, WBAL; Mr. 
Sterling; Jack Surrick, WFBR and E. Jett, WMAR-TV, all Baltimore stations see page 152 




1952 has to start with television. For 
virtually everything that's happening 
in radio today stems from TV's bean- 
stalk growth in the past few years and 
its potential for multiplying itself many 
times over in the next few years. 

Within network radio, the big TV- 
created problem is how much to charge 
for time. CBS is expected to be the 
first network to reach any decision. 
The thinking of CBS strategists is that 
time costs have to come down under 
pressure from advertisers. But the net- 
work's affiliates are firmly opposed to a 
rate reduction and it is probable that 
their fiery opposition will prevent an 
official cut before the first few fall 
months have elapsed. Meanwhile, sales 
efforts at all the networks continue 
vigorously, with no stalemate in con- 
tract signing to match the horns-locked 
position of CBS and its affiliates. In- 
creasing flexibilitv in the way you can 
buy time is the rule as the webs seek 
to give their wares the maximum in at- 
tractiveness to clients. 

It's interesting to see that the same 
kind of flexibilil\ thinking also prevails 
among the sales strategists in network 
television. Network participating shows, 
co-sponsorship, and skip-a-week spon- 
sorship are all being built into the 
sales structure of network TV from 
early in its history. The reasoning here 
is not that there's any present scarcity 
of sponsors but that, when nationwide 

SPONSOR 







Radio statiors are mcrchandising-conscious. WTOP, Wash., D. C, 
has plan tied in with Mark Evans of Washington "HPL" Here Cy 
Seliznow, Food Fair prom, manager and Evans are at counter dur- 
ing record-breaking Mark Evans week promotion si*€' |MI(Jt* 70 



WNBT, New York, tie-in with Grand Union includes presence of 
stars at store openings. Here Jinx Falkenburg arrives by helicopter 
for ceremony. In return for such cooperation, stores are givino 
point-of-sale push to WNBT-advertised products St'V fUtfH' IHU 



TV comes, ways will have to be found 
of splitting the high cost burden among 
a larger number of clients. It's felt 
that television must evolve in the direc- 
tion of magazine advertising, with ad- 
vertisers buying a portion of a show 
for any desired period the way they 
buy magazine pages. 

Thus both network radio and net- 
work television are moving in the same 
direction: toward greater convenience 
for the client. 

Spot radio, unlike network, is not 
feeling much pain from TV. Business 
is good on most stations even in TV- 
saturated markets. That's particularly 
true of mornings where you actually 
have trouble getting availabilities. 
However, the stations aren't compla- 
cent. They know TV has had an im- 
pact on their audience at night as well 
as in the later afternoon periods. Many 
stations are doing their best to make 
up for any present or anticipated audi- 
ence drop-offs by increasing their mer- 
chandising activities. This isn't the lip- 
service kind fashionable among some 
outlets during their halcyon days. This 
is we-mean-business plugging to help 
clients really move goods at point-of- 
sale. 

Rapidly expanding their billings are 
the transcription firms, also to be con- 
sidered a part of spot radio. They feel 
that the impact of television on network 
radio programing — sweeping stars and 



name attractions away before it — pre- 
sents their ideal sales opportunity. 
They are exploiting it to the full, 
hoping to increase the number of re- 
gional and national clients who bin 
transcribed shows for use in markets 
of their choice. 

The TV equivalents of transcriptions 
-film shows — are enjoying similar 
boom opportunities. There's a feeling 
among some ageneymen that network 
TV, magazine-insertion pattern or no, 
may not remain an important program- 
origination factor. Their thesis is that 
film can do anything — except news 
events, sports, and quiz shows — better 



than live. They reason, therefore, thai 
stations will take network feeds only 
for a few stellar events and roll their 
own from the film reels where dailj 
show staples are concerned. 

No matter which way you look in 
radio and television there are signs ol 
rapid change — an I plenty of unan- 
swered questions. It won't be a peace- 
ful year for the men in agency an I 
client offices who have to scan the 
pieces and put together their own par! 
of the puzzle. It is to make their job 
easier that this issue of sponsor was 
designed. **+ 



Many American firms sell and advertise profitably via the air abroad. This issue, for the first 
time in any trade paper, SPONSOR compiles detailed data on air advertising internationally. 
Shown below are an Esso news show on Radio America, Lima, Peru, and Rita Hayworth beinn 
interviewed in 1948 on Radio Monte Carlo. For start of International Basics «<»«» |Jttff<? 227 




14 JULY 1952 



39 




NEITHER FEAR OF SHORTAGES NOR RELUCTANCE TO BUY PREVAIL TODAY. THE MONEYS THERE FOR THOSE WHO SELL HARD 

Economic outlook for fall 

Purse strings are loosening but . . . 

. . . you won't make Kales automatically. Hard-hitting advertising is 
more important than ever before in present return to "normal" conditions 



over-all 



As near as the economic 
prophets consulted by spon- 
sok can tell, business this fall will carry 
on at a brisker pace than during the 
spring. 1 here is already evidence that 
the consumer is beginning to spend the 
greenbacks he merely flaunted in the 
face of retailers during the past fall 
and winter. 

There wont be an) wild buying like 
there was during the year following 
ihe invasion ol South Korea. Goods 
are plentiful for the most part, the 



40 



economists say, so the consumer will 
buy what he "needs" — no more and 
no less. It's beginning to look like that 
elusive thing called a "normal" econ- 
omy. 

What does this mean to the adver- 
tiser? Generally speaking, it means 
that the consumer will buy your prod- 
uct if he"s convinced l>\ your sales 
message. Or, to put it in the negative, 
if he doesn't buy your product, it's not 
because he's hoarding money, it's be- 
cause your argument simply isn't good 



enough to make him want to buy. 

This is a time for sharpening sales 
tools and sales ideas, say the experts. 
Isn't it always, you may ask? Not 
necessarily. Fifteen months ago the 
consumer bought because he was afraid 
of shortages and eight months ago he 
resisted sales appeals because he had 
"overbought" seven months before. 
Now. the pendulum is beginning to 
suing back again but neither of these 
extreme conditions will prevail in the 
fall. Therefore, advertising will be a 

SPONSOR 



more important factor. Radio and tele- 
vision, the country's major mass me- 
dia, will play a particularly important 
part in keeping the economy's pipe- 
lines from clogging up again. 

The foregoing analysis is, of course, 
an "'averaged" summing-up of man) 
factors. Each industry has its own pri- 
vate cycle and its own individual prob- 
lems. Furthermore, when the econo- 
mists say certain sales trends will take 
place they may merely be projecting 
a present trend, that is, assuming it 
will continue in the same direction. 

All advertising media will probably 
benefit this fall as business swings to 
acquire the dollars consumers are 
spending more freely now. But radio 
and TV will probably benefit in great- 
er proportion. Radio, as the country's 
lowest-cost national medium, and TV, 
with its powerful impact, are synony- 
mous with mass selling. 

A danger some economists see is that 
firms here and there will fail to rec- 
ognize that the present loosening of 
purse strings is by no means a flood 
of coin. The money's there, but con- 
sumers have to be sold hard — first via 
advertising and followed up at the 
store counter. Firms which neglect ad- 
vertising and selling on the theory that 
the nation is traveling through a demi- 
war economy may be burned badly. 

The biggest question mark today is 
the steel dispute, apparently far from 
settlement as sponsor went to press. 
A relatively short steel strike could 
mean merely delayed demand for prod- 
ucts which depend on steel. A protract- 
ed strike, however, would eliminate 
some sales completely. For example: 
a prospective auto purchaser will wait 
a few weeks in the early summer to 
get the car he wants, but may not buy 
at all if he has to wait until fall. 

The money this man does not spend 
may or may not be spent later on other 
products. However, when money en- 
ters the monetary stream at a slower 
rate, it tends to have a depressive ef- 
fect, according to economic theory. 
Even more important is the amount of 
purchasing power lost by striking steel 
workers and those laid off because of 
steel shortages. 

Putting the steel strike aside, what 
are the factors that make the profes- 
sionals think business will be brisker 
in the fall? 

First of all, retail sales have already 
been picking up and there are no storm 
( Please turn to page 223 ) 




l/W. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY m. JtltY AI& SEP. OCT. W1V. DEC. ' JAtt FTB. HAH. APR. MAY 

source: federal RESERvr board figures 



JUH 



Department store salt's 



All retail sales and inventories 




1940 42 44 46 48 50 1950 1951 1952 

SOURCE: OEPARTMENtOf COMMtftCf 



C'onsunter ineome, sarinas, and spending 



8ILLI0NS OF DOLLARS 



■ .. .■■'"::...... 





NONJURABE GOODS j& 



DURABLE GOODS ^ 




Sponsor cheek list 



bote to use broadcast advertising} 




& 



Determine what you expect broadcast advertising to do 
for your organization. 

(The nine items cover general requirements of manufactur- 
ing and sales organizations but each organization has its 
own peculiar problems. These must be ascertained in ad- 
vance or else any advertising campaign will probably fail.) 

a. Force distribution 
| [ b. Move product 

c. Build prestige 

d. Build brand name acceptance 

I I e. Improve dealer-manufacturer relations 

f. Impress stockholders 

g. Improve employee relations 

h. Supplement printed media advertising 

I. Carry organization's primary advertising burden 



Make certain that talent pictures, biographies, and full I 
program information (week-by-week details) are available I 
to everyone requiring them. |fc 

] Plan tie-in advertising, point-of-sale material, dealer mail- 
ings. 

(Correlation of all advertising activity with broadcasting 
pays substantial dividends.) 



| Plan the program debut as a show, not as an opportunity 
for organization executives to discourage listeners through 
long talks. 



| See that effective on-the-air promotion of program starts 
at least two weeks before the program makes its bow. 

(Free network and station time is available, but many 
advertisers are finding it productive of sales and increased 
audiences to buy bigger announcements to supplement 
what the stations and networks do.) 



| See that a complete promotion kit goes out to stations 
(if yours is a network program, the web's publicity de- 
partment will work with your agency and your advertising 
manager on this). 



Determine territorial coverage desired. 



Centralize responsibility for broadcast advertising. 



Working with your organization's advertising agency, select 
the broadcast form (spot radio, network radio, TV, FM, 
storecasting, transit radio) to carry the campaign. 

Build or buy the proper program or announcement to reach 
the market for the product. 



With the program and stations or network selected, hold 
conferences with your staff so that the entire organization 
knows the campaign and its objectives. 

Hold district meetings with your sales staff, briefing them 
on the broadcast advertising campaign. There should be 
preliminary meetings during which ideas of the sales staff 
In the field are obtained on the campaign. 



Set up a public relations conference with network or station 
publicity men, your organization's publicity department, 
agenoy's press staff, independent public relations men of 
talent, and perhaps package owner publicity men. 

(Working as a team, these men can increase the audience 
of any program. Without organization and cooperative 
operation, waste through duplication of publicity material 
is inevitable.) 



1 | Establish a publicity plan for the campaign. 



Make certain that everyone involved knows the person 
in the organization who is responsible for your broadcast 
advertising. 

(That executive must be briefed on not only what the 
broadcast is supposed to accomplish but on the public 
relations aspects of the program as well. 



] Design a dealer and distributor promotion kit on the 
program. 

(Make certain that the material does not duplicate that 
which network stations will use for the same purpose.) 



| Once the program has started to build its audience, travel 
it around the country. 



| Formulate plans for continuing promotion. Only through 
week-in-week-out exploitation ' can a new program really 
be sold to its full audience. 



Tie program in with all merchandising and advertising 
plans. 



| | Make certain that everything that is done promotion wise 
(guest stars, special exploitation, etc.) reaches the pub- 
licity departments of the stations, networks and your dis- 
tributors and dealers in time for them to obtain newspaper 
space. 



Plan mail-pulls (contests and give-aways) far enough in 
advance so that they may be merchandised at the point- 
of sale as well as on the air. 



| Don't forget to write "thank you's" to the stations that 
make promotion reports on your program. 



Where possible have product packaging include refer- 
ence to the program. 



I Check newspaper reaction to the program. 

(A special pness clipping order is broadcast advertising 
life insurance.) 



'Broadcast advertising is a living thing; it requires broadcast-by-broadcast watching, nursing, cultivating. It's a product that is being sold as 
well as one that is selling for you. Broadcasting has to be worked at and with to return full dividends. The easy way is the non-productive way. 



network 

radio 



Rate cut hangs in balance 

Network radio, realistically speaking, appears to be the onl\ 
sector in the broadcast advertising field in what might be 
described as a state of abeyance. Persistent reports of an 
impending CBS rate cut have had this unsettling effect: Ad- 
vertisers and agencies conjured with the thought that some 
such action — if adopted by all networks — might stabilize the 
price structure and curb under-the-counter and special deals; 
affiliates saw such cuts as imperiling not only their income 
from the networks but their local and national spot frame- 
work; the networks themselves pressured, on one side, by 
some major advertisers for a reevaluation of the medium and 
harassed, on the other side, by competitor price-war tactics, 
have been groping for a solution for both affiliate and buyer. 

Now that CBS and their affiliates have come to an under- 
standing that no action affecting rate adjustments will be 
taken unilaterally — though the basic problem is not consid- 
ered settled — the networks generally are moving ahead with 
recharged effort to sell advertisers on the idea that radio can 
still perform on a maximum sales level at minimum cost. 

The ensuing pages give factual data on net radio's advan- 
tage over other media in cost-per-1,000. Flexibility in buy- 
ing remains a top lure among the networks, as well as the 
various merchandising plans — all noted herein. 

14 JULY 1952 



I6.IH- 4iil si. -II us 


II 


Flexibility in soiling' 


16 


BoxKt'oro on network spon- 
sorship 


Hi 


Merchandising 


47 


Politics on the air 


17 


Top ;is:rii; u-s and clients 


50 


ltiisiness outlook 


50 


Program trends 


50 


Costs 


5 1 


Network coverage 


5 1 


Nielsen replies to S.UI on 




coverage 


51 


Available network pack- 
ages, list 


56 



43 




\etivork radio yetting boost from TV as Pat Weaver tahes over DIBC radio programing, CBS 1 

Sylvester L. (Pat) Weaver's new authority over radio as well as TV programing (left) with Dave Garroway whose "Today'' show he conceived as a way of ex- 1 
at NBC marks an important turn in the road for net radio. Henceforth it may tending net TV to morning hours. Picture immediately above is of Goodman L 
rely strongly on TV-built names and programing ideas. Weaver is shown above and Todson "What's My Line" TV show being brought over to CBS Radio for | 



Rate cut stains 



Q. Are there any indications that 
a rate cut is coming this fall? 

A. Overt, no; behind the scenes, yes. 
Before spelling out the connotations 
of this double answer, it would be help- 
ful t© look back over what led up to 
the 1-2 July meeting; of some 160 CBS 
affiliates in New York. 

i This rump session, after passing a 
resolution demanding that CBS dismiss 
any thoughts of rate cutting it was 
rumored to have, invited the network's 
top dignitaries. William S. Paley and 
Frank Stanton, to explain the network's 
intentions, il any. with regard to a 
rate adjustment. Out of the latter meet- 
ing came an assurance from CBS that 
the networks rate card would not be 
revised without affiliate consultation. 
An alliliates committee was appointed 
li\ the same rump session to meet with 
CBS later in the summer. Purpose: to 
discuss any proposals that (IBS may 
have in respect to the rate situation.) 

Network radios rate problem is a 



44 



natural outgrowth of TVs rise. The 
introduction of any revolutionary de- 
velopment is bound to have tremendous 
repercussions and television intro- 
duced, obviously, the revolutionary 
factor in the broadcasting industry. 
For the first time since its inception 
radio, starting from at least 194o, has 
had to share home audiences with a 
competitive communications medium 
and. what is more pertinent to the sub- 
ject in question, the advertising dollar. 
As the TV audience expanded, the big 
national advertisers, generally speak- 
ing, sought to span both radio and TV 
by shifting their advertising budgets, 
\\ ith newspapers feeling the nick the 
hardest. 

Suddenly — and this might be dated 
1950-51 — these advertisers started ap- 
plying the scalpel to radio. As the ra- 
dio dollar networkwise grew scarcer, 
the industry, instead of setting up ma- 
chinery for controlled adjustment, re- 
sorted, in some quarters, to a bargain- 
counter economy. More often than not 
rate cards were discarded and special 
deals became the vogue. 



In the spring of 1952 this uncon- 
trolled economy of an industry reached 
the crisis level. Nabobs among na- 
tional advertisers, as fall renewal dis- 
cussions came up with the top net- 
works, flashed the latest quantitative 
radio rating figures and "hinted" that 
conditions called for rate adjustments. 

Now to get get back to the "no" and 
"yes" answer to the question posed 
above: 

The "hint" has up to this moment 
been met in two ways. Quite a num- 
ber of advertisers have obtained their 
"adjustment" in the form of reductions 
in the price of the program. At least 
one of the bluest of blue-ribbon adver- 
tisers will return its stable of programs 
to the air this fall with a definite re- 
duction in rates. What the network has 
apparently done here is meet what it 
considered a desperate situation with 
a calculated risk. CBS is banking on 
the expectation that it will be able to. 
at the opportune lime, prevail upon its 
alliliates to agree to an adjustment in 
the nighttime rate structure. If this 
fails, it will have to write off the differ- 

SPONSOR 




converts TV show for radio 

the fall under Philip Morris sponsorship. PM is also the show's 
TV sponsor. It's anticipated that trend to bring TV shows 
over to radio will grow, in some cases via taped soundtracks 



ence as so much less profit. In the 
meantime the network will have kept 
its commercial schedule on an even 
keel, and can still hope that the circu- 
lation represented by this schedule will 
attract enough other business to make 
up the difference. 

Reduced to specific terms, the prac- 
tices just described can be construed 
as a rate cut: the advertisers involved 
will not be paying their time bills ac- 
cording to the stipulations of the rate 
card officially now in effect. And, if 
it's a program "deal," these clients will 
now be paying only what it actualh 
costs to produce the show. The ar- 
rangements are, in effect, a behind-the- 
scenes rate cut. To be an overt cut the 
present deals would have to be avail- 
able to any advertiser and listed as 
such. As the procedure now prevails, 
the cut is subject to negotiation. 

What makes it doubtful whether a 
rate cut will be introduced this fall is 
the temper of opposition displayed by 
the 180-odd CBS affiliates in New York 
during the two-day session in early 
July. CBS will submit some time in 

14 JULY 1952 



August a documented reason for a cut. 
It will go to the committee appointed 
by the affiliates. 

CBS has in hand contracts signed 
by 166 affiliates which grant the net- 
work complete authority to revise the 
station's network rates. The affiliates 
gathering 1 July petitioned the network 
not to exercise this legal authority. 
The indications are that when CBS 
does present its reasons for a cut, 
along with a formula for the reduction, 
it will proceed with low-pressure tac- 
tics, all of which are expected to en- 
tail several months of negotiation. 



Q. Would the rate cut be retro- 
active? 

A. The indications are that any rate 
cut will not be retroactive, unless it is 
so stipulated in individual sponsor con- 
tracts. It is understood that the spe- 
cial deal contracts that go into effect 
in the fall bar the sponsors involved 
from benefiting from any rate card ad- 
justments which may materialize for 
the run of the 1952-53 season. 



Q. How much would the cut be? 

A. CBS is reported to have 25% in 
mind, but this is stoutly denied. Any- 
way, under the assurance CBS has 
given its affiliates, the amount is sub- 
ject to negotiations with the stations. 



Q. How about the other networks 
with regard to a rate cut? 

A. They are all for the time being 
sitting quietly by waiting to see what 
happens between CBS and its affiliates. 
If CBS announces a rate cut, it is in- 
evitable that the other three networks 
will follow suit almost immediately. 
The probability is, however, that none 
of them will act before CBS which was 
the first to cut rates in 1951. The move 
that year came as somewhat of a sur- 
prise in contrast to the present state of 
prolonged anticipation. 



Q. Will a rate cut result in sta- 
bilizing the rate structure? 

A. The "pro's" and "con's" on this 
one are as resolute as they are miles 
apart. CBS thinks that a cut would sta- 
bilize the structure by pegging rates 
at a more realistic level. The contrary- 
position is that there's nothing to pre- 
vent a competitor from continuing his 



under-the-counter tactics; all be has 
to do is put out a rate card meeting any 
official adjustment and then proceed 
as usual to granl special deals. Argue 
the con's: \ se< ond round of rate cuts 
would be just another case of tempor- 
izing with a critical problem which 
calls for solution on a broad and all- 
industry scale. By yielding to one ex- 
pediency after another the industry 
only creates that more confusion and 
question about the medium in the mind 
of the sponsor. 

Affiliates are concerned that network 
radio may be entering into a vicious 
cycle era, with network rates being cut 
to attract clients and clients hesitating 
to buy network radio because the rate 
lowering downgrades it in their minds. 
Moreover, say the affiliates, cutting net- 
work rates any more would force them 
to drop some of the services they now 7 
give to their communities. I'.ven worse, 
it would probably brinj: about cuts in 
rates for local and national spot time 
where business is now good. 

It's for these reasons that the affili- 
ates are battling so vigorously to hold 
the rate line. They believe advertisers 
can be sold on the continued value of 
network radio at present prices and 
many have suggested some kind of in- 
dustry program along research lines. 

Meanwhile, the attitude of adver- 
tisers is that the present unstable rate 
structure, with deviations from the rate 
card, is unhealthy for both the radio 
people and the sponsors. 



ABC major programing trend is to use of hill- 
billy d.j. programs like Cal Tinney (below) 




45 



■■■■ 



ittutti 



Flexibility in selling 



Q. What are the networks' sell- 
ing plans for the fall? 

A. Flexibility seems- to he the by - 
word for all the networks. In other 
words, let the sponsor tell them whal 
is wanted, and the size of the network 
and the share of the program will be 
tailored to fit. Individually, the net- 
works are making the following plans: 
NBC is prepared to offer any com- 
bination of programs and stations that 
ma) he desired. This would include 
one-shot hu\> on established sustain- 
ing programs, or saturation purchase 
of one of several programs for a spe- 
cific period of time. NBC also still has 
the Tandem type of operation in which 
several participating sponsors may buy 
into several shows on different nights 
in the week. Or, if the sponsor chooses, 
he can take advantage of the some- 
what dormant Guaranteed Advertising 
Attention and Market Basket Plans. 
(Latter plan is a Tandem-type opera- 
tion with programs scheduled on kev 



shopping davs of the week and with 
local cut-ins for participating super- 
markets made available on each pro- 
gram. ) 

ABC spotlights its Pyramid Plan, 
which assures a sponsor the three top 
programs virtually regardless of the 
length of the sponsorship. Network 
has further reinforced the plan b\ 
moving one of the three shows in- 
volved to Friday night, one of its 
strongest programing nights of the 
week. Unlike similar plans on the oth- 
er webs, tbis one accords a sponsor 
insured discounts on frequency. Dur- 
ing 1951-52. ABC estimates, the Pyra- 
mid Plan averaged the lowest cost-per- 
1.000 of any participating nighttime 
program plan on any network. 

( l!> apparently has no -| ifnallx 

new selling plan ready for unveiling 
at this time. Nor has Mutual. 



Q. What have advertiser reac- 
tions been to the network radio 
program saturation plans? 

A. Some have found them quite effec- 
tive, especially with respect to getting 



quick action in announcing the advent 
of a new car model, introduction of a 
new package, a reduction in price, and 
the like. 

On the negative side there are such 
points as: 

I 1 I The exposures don't come in 
the best and most telling sequences: 
1 2 I while the shows are easy to buy. 
it is difficult to allocate or validate the 
results: (3) such plans aren't always 
something that can be merchandised 
to sales forces and to dealers; (4) 
they lack the vital promotion that an 
advertiser of stature likes to put be- 
hind his own program. However, dis- 
tributors, especially in the automotive 
and electrical appliance fields, continue 
to have a strong yen for this kind of 
radio operation, and hence these plans 
have a substantially promising outlook 
for the coming season. The majority 
of the netyvorks are convinced that the 
saturation device will meet with great- 
er sponsor acceptance each successive 
season and will become as ingrained a 
part of the business as the spot an- 
nouncement. 



#/o.v.wo#°c* on m*4ii'in°ii sponsorship 



Number of sponsored net radio shows 
by product groups 



No, of shows 



Sponsor classification 



I4>;>1 
(1 Jan.^ 1952 
thru 15 = (April) 

Oct.) | 



Automobiles & Accessories 




5 


Beverages 




8 


Clothing 




3 


Confections 




5 


Cosmetics, Toilet Reguisites 


12 


Drugs & Drug Products 




15 


Foods & Food Products 




28 


Gasoline & Lubricants 




9 


Home Furnishings 




11 


Institutional 




11 


Insurance 


5 


Jewelry & Accessories 




2 


Miscellaneous 




10 


Publications 


2 


Religious Groups 




7 



Soap & Soap Products 
Tobacco 



1J 

8 



8^ 

12 

26 



11 
11 

5 



Number of sponsored net radio shows 
by program types 



Type of program 



No, of shows 



1951 1952 

(Ort.) I ipril I 



Children's Variety 




3 




2 


Comedy-Variety 




9 




7 


Comedy -Situation 




13 
6 




12 


Commentary, Interviews 


7 


Drama: Straight Drama 




14 




13 


Juvenile & Western 




8 


13 


Mystery & Detection 




21 




20 


Farm Programs 




2 




3 


Film News 




3 




Forums 




1 




1 


Health Talks 




1 




1 


Home Economics 




2 




3 


Musical & Musical Variety 


24 




22 


News 




27 




26 


Panel Quiz 






Quiz & Participation 




16 




12 



Religious 



Serials 
Sports 



34 
9 



Variety — Straight 
Variety — Talent 



8 
34 
8 
8 
2 



46 



SPONSOR 



Mutual merchandising puts point-of-sale pos- 
ters in IGA stores across U. S. Summer mer- 
chandising experiment of net has picnic theme 



Merchandising 



Q. Have the networks anything 
new in merchandising plans? 

A. CBS states that it lias one in the 
works that can't be announced for sev- 
eral weeks. Mutual may have some- 
thing to report on the resulls of a 
major test recently launched in con- 
nection with its own merchandising 
system, the Plus-} alue Stores. I sin" 
5,500 Independent Grocers' Alliance 
Stores as a base. Mutual set out to tie 
in its clients with hundreds of thou- 
sands of display pieces and much other 
promotion in 30 states on a limited 
two-week run. The network's theory 
here is that a year-'round network plan 
is "impractical, unimaginative and too 
costly for the sales traffic to bear if il 
is to be done with honest results." 
NBC's merchandising service, which is 
completely free to network clients, is 
moving along sprucely. Several prod- 
uct jobs have already been wrapped 
up with gratifying results, as a batch 
of letters received by NBC show. 



Politics on the air 



Q. How will the Presidential cam- 
paign affect selling in network 
radio? 

A. Nighttime business being what it 
is. the networks are out to pitch for 
campaign business with hammer and 
tongs, and. if necessary, some stretch- 
ing of the frequency rules and other 
conditions. Mutual, for instance, has 
announced that political business will 
be entitled to the same 13-or-more- 
weeks' discounts as allowed other types 
of accounts, and that it won't even be 
necessary for a party to occupy the 
same spot to benefit from the dis- 
counts. The theory here is that il 
would be impossible to furnish the 
same spot to any one political account 
as ordered, since time preemptions 
usually come on short notice. 

The sales departments of the four 



NBC has cross-U.S. staff of merchandising men 
who help stations place poster material like 
this in stores carrying goods of its sponsor? 








14 JULY 1952 




Av 0Rui NBC 






' 



WUki:; 




MAN 



x 



\ 



• «« • • 

i 



: 






u 



M-fJivLlli^' 



LOW 




Mister PLUS stands for the one network that dominates radio listening - 
by nearly 2 to 1-throughout " N on -TV America" . . . that 45-state market 
where 60,000,000 customers live and listen. . .where there are as many radio 

homes as there are TV sets in the entire U.S and where Mutual has 

416 stations, more than the other three networks combined. 




Actual Listening in Non-TV America 

(Day and Night all week long) 

This chart summarizes the findings of a 1,000,000- 
interview study (by J. A.Ward, Inc., Feb-Mar, '52) in 
151 markets in 45 states . . . distributed for accurate 
sampling of the total U.S. area where TV cannot 
be seen. Included, in proper proportion, are non-MBS 
markets, MBS-only markets, and markets shared 
by MBS with 1, 2, and 3 other network stations. 
Complete documentation of Mutual dominance 
is available on request. 



the 

UTUAL 

network of 560 affiliated stations 

. . . THE NUMBER ONE ROUTE 
TO NON-TV AMERICA . . . 
AND THE LOWEST-COST ROUTE 
TO ALL AMERICA 




Mister PLUS also stands for the one network that traditionally offers the 
lowest-cost route to sales success in all radio. Today especially, Mutual 
is so geared to the current advertising economy that its clients can continue 
to depend on the lowest-scaled rate card in the business— and consistent 



delivery of PLUS -values which no other broadcasting network can match. 



•II 



networks expect that the joint income 
from this source will he as big as it 
was in the 1948 campaign, despite the 
interim expansion of TV. The) base 
the estimate on the belief that the small 
town and rural vote will loom even 
bigger in this campaign and that to get 
to it the parties must use radio with 
even greater intensit) than the\ pro- 
pose using TV. Then again, on radio 
it will be easier to get choice evening 
periods on short notice. 



Top agencies and clients 

Q. What are the top 10 network 
clients buying in radio? 

A. Procter & Gamble. Sterling Drug. 
General Food. Miles Laboratories. 
Lever Bros.. General Mills. American 
Home Products. Liggett & Myers, 
Campbell Soup. Colgate. 



Q. What are the top agencies 
placing network radio business? 

A. Dancer. Fitzgerald & Sample. \ & R. 
Benton & Bowles. Geoffrey Wade. Cun- 
ningham & Walsh. Compton Advertis- 
ing. BBDO. J. Walter Thompson. 



Business outlook 



Q. What does the network radio 
picture for the fall look like? 

A. From present indications daytime 
business should be as good as it was 
last season, with even a possibility of 
improvement. CBS' Monday through 
Friday daytime schedule is sold out 
from 10 a.m. to 4.15 p.m. NBC has 
the renewal for the Procter & Gamble 
programing block in the bag. and the 
rest of the network's current daytime 
lineup with minor exceptions will lie 
sold for the fall. Mutual also is in a 
strong daytime position. 

The nighttime prospect, generall) 
speaking, doesn't give promise of firm- 
ing up much in the fall. A rate cut, 
if adopted by the networks, may 
change the outlook, but there is no 
evidence among ad agencies that they 
have clients primed to move into the 
medium alter rales are cut. 



Q. What new accounts have the 
networks signed for the fall? 

A. New CBS sales al presstime were 



A. New CBS sales at press time were 
three five-minute periods of Bob Troul 
to Ford. My Friend Irma to Cavalier 
cigarettes, and What's My Line, on 
NBC for the summer, to Philip Mor- 
ris cigarettes. Also noteworthy is the 
fact that Mars Candy will schedule 
People Are Funny on CBS every week, 
instead of last season's alternate-week 
arrangement. Incidentally, this is the 
first time that Ford will have a steady 
program going in network radio sine; 1 
\f cancelled The Ford Theatre in 1949 
on the same network. ABC's lone new- 
comer to date for the fall is Philco's 
five-minute evening spot Monda\ 
through Friday with Edwin C. Hill. 

Q. What's the present run-down 
of the NBC and CBS sponsored 
nighttime schedule? 

A. B\ nights of the week CBS" lineup 
is as follows: 

Sunday — Our Miss Brooks (Gen- 
eral Foods). Jack Benny (Lucky 
Strike ) . Amos 'n' Andy ( Rexall Drug I . 
Edgar Bergen ( Hudnut ) , Philip Morris 
Playhouse. Hallmark Playhouse, a 
Hollywood-type star theatre ( Pearson 
Pharmacal ) . Longine Choraliers, and 
Bob Trout ( General Foods ) . 

Monday - - Suspense ( Auto Lite ) . 
Talent Scouts (Liptonl. Lux Radio 
Theatre. Bob Hawk (Camel). Bob 
Trout ( Ford ) . 

Tuesday People Are Funny 

I Mars I. Mr. and Mrs. North (Col- 
gate). Life With Luigi ( Wrigley ) . My 
Friend Irma (Cavalier). Bob Trout 
( Ford ) . 

Wednesday — Dr. Christian ( Chese- 
brough). Bing Crosby (General Elec- 
tric). Blue Ribbon Bouts (Pabst). and 
Bob Trout ( Ford I . 

Thursday — Dr. Keen ( operation 
Tandem). What's My Line (Philip 
Morris ) . and Bob Trout ( General 
Foods ) . 

Friday — Music experimental night. 

Saturday — Gene Aulry (Wrigley). 
Tarzan (General Foods), (king Busters 
(General Foods). Sanka Salutes I Gen- 
eral Foods ) . 

NBC's sponsored nighttime lineup: 

Monday — Railroad Hour ( Ameri- 
can Association ol Railroads), Voice 
of Firestone. Telephone Hour, Band of 
America (Cities Service). 

Tuesday Cavalcade of America 

(DuPoul). Dean Martin and Jerry 
Lewis (Chesterfield), Fibber McGee & 



Molly (Pet Milk), Fred Allen I Old 
Gold). 

Wednesday - - The Great Gilder- 
sleeve I Kraft I. Groucho Marx ( De- 
Soto I . Big Story I Pall Mall I . 

Thursday — Roy Rogers I General 
Foods). Dragnet (Chesterfield), Coun- 
terspy I Gulf Oil). 

Friday — Hit Parade ( Lucky Strike I . 
Mario Lanza ( Coca-Cola I . 

Saturday Grand Ole Opry ( R. J. 
Reynolds). Vaughn Monroe I R. J. 
Reynolds ) . 

Sunday - - Phil Harris-Alice Faye 
(RCA i. Theatre Guild (U.S. Steel). 

In addition to the above CBS has the 
following line up of quarter hours from 
6:45 to 8 p.m. : Lowell Thomas, Beulah. 
jack Smith (Procter & Gamble), and 
Ed Murrow ( Amoco I.Monday through 
Friday, and Club 15 ( Campbell Soup ) . 
Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. 

NBC also has four Monday through 
Friday 15-minute strips between 6:45 
and o p.m. They are: Three Star Ex- 
it a I Sun Oil). Pure Oil Time (Pure 
Oil Co.). News of the World I Miles 
Labs.) and One Man's Family I Miles 
Labs. ) . 

( ABC and MBS lineups were not 
available at presstime. I 

Q. What's the total number of 
commercial night-time hours NBC 
and CBS has under contract for 
the fall? 

A. At the time sponsor went to press 
the count stood: CBS. over 20 hours:' 
NBC, 151/2 hours. 



Program trends 



Q. What will be the main pro- 
graming trends in radio this fall? 

A. From information at hand it is 
hard to discern any sharp or startling 
departures from the norm. CBS. how- 
ever, seems to be especially active in 
experimenting with program forms and 
trying to develop new variations of 
old forms. It intends to go on with il> 
modestly scaled two hours of music 
Friday nights, hoping to make this an 
attractive buy through improved pro- 
duction technique, enhanced quality, 
and reduced cost. In the field of dra- 
matic entertainment, the network has 
high expectations for the London-pro- 
duced Horatio Hornblower. which it 
describes as having a now I mood of 



50 



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Announcing . . . 







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Give your product a seasonable lift with one 
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THE FRANK FONTAINE SHOW-A half-hour of 
rippling corned) with Frank Fontaine and his zany 
impersonations of Fred Frump and John L. C. Sil- 
voney . . . the baby-sitting dilemmas ol the Fontaine 
family (latest count: a hilarious eight). Sundays, 
8:00-8:30 p.m. EDT 

HORATIO HORNBLOWER-Starring the dis- 
tinguished Michael Redgrave as hero of C. S. 
Forester's best-sellers. Salt-spray adventures and 
sparkling romance ... with an audience alread) 
assembled by the dashing Hornblower of magazine, 
book, and screen. (Mondays. 8:00-8:30 p.m. EDT) 

DECEMBER BRIDE -Spring Byington is "her 
usual delightful self" (says Variety) as a new kind 
of mother-in-law (her son-in-law dotes on her). 
Warm situation comedy with a new view of an old 
relationship — delight for every in-law in the land. 
(Sundays, 7:00-7:30 p.m. EDT) 

GUNSMOKE -There's a U.S. Marshal, assorted 
villains, the setting is the West — but there's a price- 
less missing-ingredient: It's a Western without corn. 
Adult writing, believable acting ... the effect — to 
win a new audience for the sagas of the prairies. 
(Saturdays, 7:30-8:00 p.m. EDT) 

THE STEVE ALLEN SHOW-A program with a 
human format — first name, Steve. It's a changing 
and always surprising blend of artesian ad-libbing 
...the Allen piano... the Bobby Sherwood Trio... 
and bright banter with unexpected guests. A smash 
hit on the Coast, this show has top national pros- 
pects. It's all easy. . . nothing's forced ... a half-hour 
of fun. (Monday through Friday, 9:30-10:00 p.m. 
EDT) 

Ask your CBS Radio representative for sam- 
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il- own. It is also introducing this 
fall what it describes as a "p-\< 1 1 < » I < > l; i - 
cal W estern," Gunsmoke. 

A move that has. according to trade 
comment, intriguing implications on 
the radio program front is the exten- 
sion of Sylvester L. I Pat I Weaver's 
authority at NBC. As vice president in 
charge of the radio network, as well as 
head of TV operations. Weaver is 
brought within the networks radio 
programing orbit. \s some industry 
obsei \ ers put it. the extension of Weav- 
ci s authorit) could be a tactical an- 
swer to one of the complaints I nun 
NBC radio affiliates, namely, that NBC 
has been concentrating its program cre- 
ative talent on TV. to the almost com- 
plete neglect of its radio programing 
structure. B\ linking Weaver to radio, 
these observers point out NBC is. in ef- 
fect, saving to its affiliates: "You tell 
us that the l\ network has been get- 
ting all the breaks in creative program- 
ing and show glamor'.'' All right, we 
have now put in charge of the radio 
network the very man responsible for 
all the creative effort and glamor von 
talk about. He"s now on your side. a- 
much as TVs. 

Meanwhile NBC is without a high- 
powered, glamor-studded program for 
the fall. The Big Show, which held the 
big radio spotlight for two season-, is 
not coming back. NBC. however, does 
report that some important Hollywood 
mimes have indicated an interest in re- 
turning to radio this fall and that net- 
work is negotiating for several such 
names for programs, which "will he 
offered at pines far lower than their 
counterparts were listed in the past." 

The most conspicuous trend at ABC 
i> toward flisk jockeys specializing in 
\\ estern and hillbillv music. The net- 
work is scheduling two and a quarter 
hours of it each week-day afternoon. 
General Mills has underwritten two 
segments of it — a quarter hour with 
Bill Ring, out of Springfield. Mo., and 
a half-hour, m.c.'d bv Cal Tinney. Be- 
tween the Iwo there will be 90 minutes 
o! the same t \ | m ■ ol country music pre- 
sided over bv Tennessee Ernie. 



Costs 



Q. What is the price trend in net- 
work radio programs? 

A. Price- arc prellv much down to 
bedrock now. Practically all the wa- 
in has been squeezed out of network- 



controlled package.- which can't lay 
claim to a track record — that is. pre- 
v ions sponsorship. Nighttime half-hour 
dramatic program without names range 
between $2,500 and $3,250. With a 
Hollywood name added, a show in this 
category now comes to around $4,000. 
A case in point where even this figure 
is high for a screen-supported show is 
NBCs Silent Men. With Douglas Fair- 
banks. Jr.. as part of the package, this 
one can be bad for $3,842. CBS is of- 
fering the long-tested Crime Photogra- 
pher for $3,400. and the equally well- 
established The FBI in War and Peace 
for $3,975. The only new comedy show 
being offered is CBS' Frankie Fon- 
tainne, and that's listed for $5,500. 
which price is around $2,000 less than 
a stanza of this stripe would have had 
to sell for a couple of seasons back. 

Because of the lean market and the 
low prices there's very little new radio 
material coming from the better known 
and more successful freelance pack- 
agers. They're concentrating their ef- 
forts on TV. This situation could 
change overnight. Clients, who have 
been exclusively TV, are showing here 
and there an interest in going back to 
radio, and. according to their agencies, 
some of these sponsors have expressed 
a preferred interest in untested shows 
so long as they have a good chance of 
succeeding. This is a sharp reversal of 
custom for the business. With but the 
rarest of exceptions, programs have for 
years been bought only on the basis of 
ratings and performance on the air. 

Speaking generally, the listed prire 
of a show doesn't often match the price 
paid bv the advertiser. Program buy- 
ing has come to have a bargaining flex- 
ibility all its own. The final price can 
largely depend on the size of the com- 
mitment for time. 



Q. What shows available at low 
cost can do a good job? 

A. ABC thinks its serial. When a 
(,iil Marries, at $2,700 gross, packs 
plentv ol lite vet and can deliver an 
exceptionally low cost-per-1,000. It has 
the same faith in its newcomer. Ten- 
nessee Ernie Time, composed of < I i -k - 
jockeyed country music and priced as 
follows: five minutes. $250; 10 min- 
utes, $500, and 15 minutes. $750. Mon- 
day through Friday, with all prices 
subject to agency commission. CBS 
submits as a solid buv its Steve Allen. 
00-miiiute across-the-hoarder. $1,200. 



Network coverage 

Q. How many ears can be reached 
by the networks and at what cost? 

A. It would be amiss to undertake 
any calculations along these lines at 
the moment. The 1949 BMB figures 
could be used for the ear count, but 
such arithmetic would be dated, or 
found useless within the next month 
or two. at which time Ken Baker's 
Standard Audit & Measurement and 
A. C. Nielsen's coverage data are 
scheduler! to become available. I See 
letter below for Nielsen rebuttal to Ken 
Baker statement in recent sponsor 
issue. ) 

ARB's August 1951 nation-wide sur- 
vey on listening and viewing as com- 
pared to newspaper and magazine 
reading showed the breakdown for the 
average time spent with each medium 
to be: radio, 108 minutes: TV. 43 min- 
utes, newspapers. 34 minutes and mag- 
azines, 18 minutes. 



510 MADISON 

[Continued from page 9 I 
NIELSEN REBUTS BAKER 

It s unfortunate that Mr. Baker's re- 
ply to my piece on Nielsen Coverage 
Service (sponsor, June 16 1 shows 
such a blithe disregard for the realities 
of both BMB mail balloting methods 
and of modern research techniques in 
general. To accuse "a few individuals" 
of "muddying" the circulation picture 
by introducing a new and improved 
technique is merely a smoke screen to 
hide serious deficiencies. The facts are: 
1. BMB did not discard personal in- 
terviews as "unsuitable." but found 
it "impracticable" to use this su- 
perior technique because: 
(a) BMB lacked the large, highly 
trained, full-time field staff. 
widely dispersed throughout 
the I'nited States, which is an 
exclusive facility of the Niel- 
sen organization, and which is 
essential to the economy and 
accuracy of personal inter- 
views. 
i hi The uneconomic BMB policy 
of reporting separately on tinv 
counties of no indiv idual im- 
portance burdened the entire 
I Please linn to page (>0 I 



54 



SPONSOR 



This is a RATE CARD... 




At WW J, The World's First Radio Station, we believe 
in setting rates and sticking to them. 

Down through the years our rates have been set— 
and adjusted as factors warranted— to reflect honest 
appraisals of WWJ's accepted value in America's 
great fifth market. 

If new trends and influences disturb this market or 
WWJ's value, a new rate card will be published and 
enforced. 

For 32 years, WWJ management has been inter- 
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We intend to keep on dealing that way. 



nobody buys 
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THE WORLD'S FIRST RADIO STATION 
Ownmd and Operated by THE DETROIT NEWS 

National Rmprotontafivt: THE GEORGE P. HOLLINGBERY COMPANY 



UWtft 



»» no IHOCTCIIS— woo w»m 

I* (Hl>mi Ht— W.I MIGkCYCUS 



Auochtt r.l.„„o» Station WWJ-TV 



14 JULY 1952 



55 



Available network paekaye programs (radio) 

ABC radio network shows 



.-, 



TITLE 


TYPE 




APPEAL 


TIME 


PRICE 


TESTED 


EXPLANATION 


CAFE ISTANBUL 


Intrigue 




Adult 


30 min. l/wk 


$3,500 


yes 


International intrigue with Marlene Dietrich 


CROSSFIRE 


Panel 




Adult 


30 mln. l/wk 


$1,500 


yes 


Discussions with top political figures 


THE GREAT ADVENTURE 


Documentary 


Family 


30 min. 1 wk 


$3,000 


yes 


Panoramic vitw of Amer. achievements, history, people, etc. 


MR. BROADWAY 


Musical 


drama 


Family 


30 mln. l/wk 


$1,500 


yes 


Rrving reporter gives his impressions of big city 


NEWSSTAND THEATRE 


Drama 




Family 


30 mln. l/wk 


$2,500 


yes 


Tup magazine stories 


NO SCHOOL TODAY 


Variety 




Children 


I'/s hrs. 1 wk 
(portions can 
prorated) 


$1,800 
be 


yes 


Stories, entertainment for children 


POSTMARK U S. A 


Quiz 




Family 


30 mln. l/wk 


$1,750 


yes 


Contestants win prlz»s for listeners and themselves 


TENNESSEE ERNIE 


Music 




Family 


I'/i hrs. 5/wk 
(portions can 
prorated) 


$3,000 
be 


yes 


Folk music 


TIME CAPSULE 


Variety 




Family 


30 min. 1 wk 


$1,600 


yes 


Repo.t on "today" to people 100 yrs. from now 


TOP OF THE WORLD 


Aud. Partic. 


Family 


15 min. 5/wk 


$1,400 


yes 


Welcome to N.Y. show originating from Empire State tower 



CBS radio network shows 



TITLE 


TYPE 


APPEAL 




TIME 


PRICE 


TESTED 


EXPLANATION 


CEDRIC ADAMS 


Commentary 


Family 


10 


min. 


2/wk 


$1,050 


yes 


Hcmely stories, hints and humor 


THE STEVE ALLEN SHOW 


Informal 


Family 


15 


min. 


1 wk 


$1,200 


no 


Informal Interviews, comedy, with guests and music 


BIG TIME 


Comedy Music 


Family 


30 


nun 


1 /wk 


$4,300 


no 


Geo. Price with music, stars from great days of show biz 


BIG TOWN 


Drama 


Family 


30 


min. 


1 wk 


$3,550 


yes 


Adventures of Steve Wilson, dynamic editor of lllus. Press 


BROADWAYS MY BEAT 


Adventure 


Family 


30 


min. 


1 ,/wk 


$3,050 


no 


Detective's adventures behind facade of his theatrical beat 


CAPITOL CLOAKROOM 


Discussion 


Adult 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$1,275 


yes 


Interviews with nation's statesmen 


MR. CHAMELEON 


Mystery 


Family 


30 


min. 


1 wk 


$4,000 


yes 


Detective uses disguises to track down criminals 


CORRESPONDENTS' SCRATCHPAD 


News Review 


Adult 


15 


min. 


5/wk 


$975 


yes 


Recorded report from all over the world 


CBS FARM NEWS 


News 


Adult 


15 


min. 


l/wk 


$950 


yes 


Paramount interest In field of agriculture 


COUNTY FAIR 


Aud. Partic. 


Family 


15 


m'n. 


5 wk 


$3,000 


yes 


Homcmakers in entertaining stunts for major prizes 



CRIME PHOTOGRAPHER 



Mystery 



Family 



30 mln. l/wk $3,400 



Fearless press photographer covering news in large city 



DORIS DAY 



DECEMBER BRIDE 
DOLLAR A MINUTE 



ESCAPE 



FBI IN PEACE & WAR 



FRANK FONTAINE 
GALEN DRAKE 
GARDEN GATE 



GUNSMOKE 



RADIE HARRIS 



HEAR IT NOW 



JOHNNY DOLLAR 



THE JUDGE 
MR. KEEN 



LARRY LE SUEUR & THE NEWS 



THE LINEUP 



30 min. I wk $4,500 



Musical revue featuring Doris Day 



Situation ComedyFamily 



3C min. I wk $4,535 



Aud. Partic. Family 



30 min. I wk $3,625 



Antics of marriageable mother-in-law Spring Bylngton 
Guests air gripes and ambitions for a dollar a minute 



Family 



3C min. I wk $3,500 



Transports listeners into fabulous stories of high adventure 



Mystery 



Family 



30 min. I wk $3,975 



Fictional episodes of FBI crime detections 



Comedy 



Family 



30 min. l/wk $5,500 



Mimicry, characterizations, standup comedy routines 



Commentary 



Family 



15 min. I wk $1,050 



Dry humor and story telling 



Commentary 



15 min. I wk $1,300 



Home gardening 



Family 



30 min. I wk $3,250 



Marshall Mark Dillon of Dodge City combats erime in West 



5 min. I wk $1,225 



Informative interview with top Hollywood and B'way stars 



Documentary 



I hr. l/wk $8,500 



Recreates current history 



HEARTHSTONE OF DEATH SQUAD 


Mystery 


Family 


30 min. 


I /wk 


$4,000 


yes 


Exploits of famous detective 


HORATIO HORNBLOWER 


Adeventure 


Family 


30 min. 


1 wk 


$3,500 


no 


Adaptation of C S. Forester's novels 


INVITATION TO LEARNING 


Discussion 


Adult 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$1,350 


yes 


Discuss on of great literature of all ages 



Mystery 



Family 



30 nin. l/wk $3,750 



Adventures of insurance investigator 



Mystery 


Family 


3C min. 


1 wk 


$3,215 


Mystery 


Family 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$4,700 


News Report 


Adult 


15 min. 


5/wk 


$750 



Judge uses past experiences to solve cases 



Stcrirs about a kindly detective 



Roundup report on the happenings of the day 



MEET MILLIE 



MUSICLAND. U. S. A. 
N Y PHILHARMONIC 



ON A SUNDAY AFTERNOON 



OTHER WOMEN'S CHILDREN 



PEGGY LEE 



THE PEOPLE ACT 



PEOPLE'S PLATFORM 



Mystery 



Situation ComedyFamily 



Family 30 min. l/wk $4,200 

30 mln. Iwk $4,725 



Family 30 min. I wk $4,375 



Adventures behind the scenes of criminal investigations 
Fun-lcving secretary who mixes business 4 romance 
Music and soigs from musical comedy and operetta 



Family 



I hr. and 30 $21,500 
min. I wk 



Musical commentary and classical music 



Music Sports Family 



2' 2 hrs. I wk $1,600 



Music, news, sports, weather and traffic coverage 



Daytime Serial Family 



15 m'n 5 wk $2,700 



Age-old problem of choosing between career and marriage 



Musical 



Family 



15 mln I wk $2,500 



Singer and guest in musical showcase 



Documentary 



25 min. l/wk $7,000 



Current story of free Americans 



30 min. I wk $1,350 



Gives listeners a basis for making decisions on topics of 
contemporary interest 



56 



SPONSOR 



WGAR WINS 6th STRAIGHT VICTORY 
IN CLEVELAND PRESS RADIO POLL! 




See-Hear with 

STAN ANDERSON 

WGAR Wins Station Honors 
in Seventh Press Radio Poll 



ON POINT BASIS, WGAR GETS 30'Al 

STATION B...17'A 

STATIONC...15'/2 

STATIOND...10 

STATION E .... 7 

STATION F .... 1 % 



Women's Program ^ 

VI LADIES' DAY B 

S\ Children's Program H 

gk^ATRYTAllr^^ 
B |~ Public Service jgj 
CITY CLUB 




First choice: 



= I Instrumentalist 



SlSfT HENRY PILDNER = 



=H Male Vocalist === 



fj§Sjj[ REG MERRIDEW 

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TOM ARM STRONG jjjl 

Best Commercials ta 



Advertisers currently on WGAR L= 
won top three awards under this j^=| 
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CLARK RESTAURANTS 
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Your advertising message on WGAR gains 

listener respect, stimulates listener response. 

WGAR's dominant victory reflects consistently 

good programming, top-notch talent, and 

high advertising standards. 

For established audiences, enthusiastic 
listeners and exceptional response, use the 
station with 4 million friends! 

Ask now about availabilities of spots and 
segments in big-audience, low-investment 
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RADIO . . . AMERICA'S GREATEST rfflgrp WGAR Cleveland . 50,000 WATTS ■ CBS / \i \ Represented Nationally by The Henry I Christal Co 
ADVERTISING MEDIUM %Ktti/J CASTl ™ °»'«; 665 FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK CITY j£ % " /„ Canada by Radio Time Sales, Lid. Toronto. 



14 JULY 1952 



57 



PURSUIT 


Mystery 




Family 


30 


Mini 


l/wk 


$2,875 


yes 


Features Scotland Yard manhunts 


QUIZ KIDS 


Qui; 




Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$2,850 


yes 


Five talented youngsters in question and answer quiz 


ROBERT QS WAXWORKS 


Musical 




Family 


30 


min. 


5/wk 


$5,000 


yes 


Robert Q. with guests and records 


ROMANCE 


Drama 




Family 


30 


min. 


1 wk 


$2,950 


yes 


Dramatizations of outstanding love stories 


BILL SHADEL & THE NEWS 


Nows 




Adult 


15 


min. 


l/wk 


$450 


yes 


Up-to-the-minute summary of Sunday's headlines 


HOWARD K. SMITH FROM LONDON 


News 




Adult 


15 


min. 


l/wk 


$950 


yes 


Interprets week's international events 


SWEENEY & MARCH PROGRAM 


Music Coir 


edy 


Family 


30 


min. 


5/wk 


$2,675 


yes 


Records and toomfoolcry 


THINKING OUT LOUD 


News Discussion 


Adult 


10 


min. 


l/wk 


$1,050 


yes 


Recap by newsman, who has been at scene of week's big story 


BOB TROUT &. THE NEWS 


News 




Adult 


5 


min. 


i wk 


$2,000 


yes 


Complete mid-evening summary of late events 


WEATHER, U.S.A. 


News 




Family 


5 


min. 


5 wk 


$350 


yes 


Wathcr predictions and long range forecasts 


YOU & THE WORLD 


Discussion 




Adult 


15 


min. 


5/wk 


$1,950 


yes 


Designed to inform listeners on phases of everyday living 


YOU ARE THERE 


Drama 




Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$5,200 


yes 


On-thc-scene technique to historical events of pre-radio days 



1 



MBS radio network shows (prices available on request only) 



ADVENTURES OF MAISIE 



AFFAIRS OF PETER SALEM 



THE BLACK MUSEUM 



BOBBY BENSON 



BOBBY BENSON 



CRIME FIGHTERS 
DIXIELAND MATINEE 



DOWN YOU GO 



DUNN ON DISKS 



FEMME FAIR 



GEORGIA CRACKERS 



THE GREAT DAY SHOW 



HARMONY RANGERS 



HAWAII CALLS 



AL HELFER'S SPORTS DIGEST 
SYLVAN LEVIN OPERA CONCERT 
LOMBARDOLAND. USA 
BRUCE MACFARLANE 



MERTS RECORD ADVENTURES 



MGM MUSICAL COMEDY THEATRE 
MODERN ADVENTURES. CASANOVA 



MYSTERIOUS TRAVELER 



NEWS HEADLINES— FRANK SINGISER 



NICK CARTER 



OFFICIAL DETECTIVE 



TWENTY QUESTIONS 



UNDER ARREST 



VANDEVENTER NEWS 



WOMAN OF THE YEAR 



Drama 



Music 
Quiz 



EXPLANATION 



Comedy 


Family 


30 min. 


l/wk 


yes 


Ann Southern in famed movie role 


Mystery 


Family 


30 min. 


1 wk 


yes 


Urbane sleuth solves crimes 


Drama 


Family 


30 min. 


I wk 


yes 


Orson Welles narrating crime stories 


Western 


Children 


30 min. 


5/wk 


yes 


Cowboy kid and pals in adventure Western 


Western 


Children 


Ill min 


l/wk 


yes 


Cowboy kid and singing sidekick 



Family 



Family 



Family 



Family 



25 min. I wk 



Drama of law enforcement officers 



25 min. 5/wk 



Two-beat music by Southern musicians 



25 min. l/wk 



Permanent panel quiz show 



30 min. l/wk 



Rod Dunn and hot jazz records 



30 m'n. l/wk 



Bette Davis in newspaper story 



NBC radio network shows 



Variety 


Women 


15 


min. 


l/wk 


yes 


Helen Hall chats with women guests 


Music 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


yes 


Hillbilly dances and songs 


(Jin/ 


Family 


30 


mm 


1 wk 


yes 


Gl quiz show with 3-day pass as prize 


Music 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


yes 


Western ballads and folk songs 


Music 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


yes 


Music direct from Waikiki beach 


Sports 


Family 


15 


min. 


l/wk 


yes 


Review of week in sports 


Music 


Family 


15 


min. 


l/wk 


yes 


Opera highlights with large orchestra 


Music 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


yes 


The Great Guy and his music 


News 


Family 


15 


min. 


1 wk 


yes 


Midwest reporter comments on news 


Music 


Children 


30 


min. 


5/wk 


yes 


Mni Koplon plays records for kids 


Music 


Family 


60 


min. 


l/wk 


yes 


Groat MGM musicals in radio versions 


Drama 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


yes 


Errol Flynn as gay young blade 


Adventure 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


yes 


Weird adventure stories 


News 


Family 


5 


min. 


5/wk 


yes 


Midwestern editor analyzes news 


Mystery 


Family 


25 


min. 


l/wk 


yes 


Master detective at work 


Mystery 


Family 


25 


nun 


l/wk 


yes 


Dotective captain vs. underworld 


Quiz 


Family 


30 


min. 


1 wk 


yes 


America's favorite parlor game 


Drama 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


yes 


Men behind bars, authentic dramatizations 


News 


Family 


15 


min. 


l/wk 


yes 


Veteran newsman reports 



i 



JANE ACE. DISK JOCKEY 



AMERICAN FORUM OF THE AIR 



ARCHIE ANDREWS 



BEST PLAYS 



THE CHASE 



CRITIC AT LARGE 



DIMENSION X 



THE FALCON 



FIRST NIGHTER 



HOLLYWOOD LOVE STORY 



A LIFE IN YOUR HANDS 



EXPLANATION 



Comedy 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$2,353 


yes 


Jane and Goodman Ace. music and patter 




Forum 


Adult 


Hi 


min. 


l/wk 


$2,059 


yes 


Theodore Cranik presides, national figures debate 




Comedy 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$2,500 


yes 


Teenage jaunts into mis-adventure 




Drama 


Family 


1 


hr. 


/wk 


$5,883 


yes 


The finest of the Broadway stage 




Drama 


Adult 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$2,942 


yes 


Suspense, with ironic or surprise endings 




Commentary 


Family 


15 


min. 


l/wk 


$759 


yes 


Leon Pearson covers books, plays, etc. 




Drama 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$2,971 


yes 


Imaginative, suspenseful science fiction 




Mystery 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$3 mill 


yes 


Escapades with police and young ladies 




Drama 


Family 


30 


min. 


l wk 


$2,236 


yes 


Long-time favorite, with original cast 




Drama 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$1,823 


yes 


Romantic fiction against cinema background 





Family 



30 min. l/wk $2,942 



Gripping stories of the courtroom 



h 



58 



SPONSOR 







ICEJC - tra ordinary 
ADVERTISING ACTION 



Advertisers get fast, action-packed results when 
they use KEX, Oregon's only 50,000 watt station. 




CHECK THESE CURRENT CAMPAIGNS 



ARMOUR & COMPANY 

A special Portland promotion featuring KEX Kiddie Star, 
Uncle Bob, has the sale of Star Brand Frankfurters and Pork 
Sausages soaring! 

Uncle Bob makes personal appearances at supermarkets and auditions 
young talent. Winners are presented weekly at a Saturday morning 
theatre party which is broadcast over KEX. 



KEX SUMMER BANDWAGON 

A combination promotion between KEX and seven grocery 
groups (representing over a hundred retail outlets) has 
resulted in the greatest direct selling campaign ever in action 
in the Portland area. 

KEX provides a saturation radio campaign — and the stores feature 
"Bandwagon" products in their advertising. These sixteen food adver- 
tisers are currently riding the KEX Bandwagon: 



AMAZO Desserts 
ARMOUR Star Brand Products 
BLUE BELL Chips 
BLUEBONNET Margerine 
FAB 



CROWN Flour 
PEPSI-COLA 
POST'S Corn-fetti 
CUTICURA Soap & Ointment 
FRANZ Bread 



General Mills WHEATIES 
GRANDMA COOKIES 
JUNKET Sherbets 
KELLOGG Variety Pack 
NALLEY'S Tang and Chips 




WELCH'S Grape Juice 



CAVALIER Cigarettes 



MORE ACTION FOR THESE ADVERTISERS 



FISHEL'S • Portland outdoor furniture retailer 
celebrated 30th anniversary with KEX spot "sat- 
uration" campaign and special "Kay West Festive 
Thursday" broadcast. Result: sales climb. 



SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION 

Attributes $50,000 individual deposit 
to 50,000 watt KEX newscast. 



LUCKY LAGER BREWING COMPANY . Sponsors 
late evening "Dance Time." Top records of the week 
are tabulated from the enthusiastic response of 
dealers and music operators. 



During 



the 



Her6 ' S Pr0 ° f ,, f KEX ZSX'nS freTm 99 
last six months KEX »«" cou nties, plus 
of the total 121 Pac. fie : Co«t * ^ 

AlaS KO British CO ^- b -, io A narinfo rrna- 

eight other states. For a 

♦ion, contact KEXjal e* or Free & ^ 



KEX 



Oregon's Gvdcf 50,000 Watt Station 

ABC AFFILIATE IN PORTLAND 



WESTINGHOUSE RADIO STATIONS Inc • KEX • KYW • KDKA • WBZ • WBZA • WOWO • WBZ-TV 
National Representatives, Free & Peters, except for WBZ-TV; tor WBZ-TV, NBC Spot Sales 



LIVE LIKE A MILLIONAIRE 



MEET THE PRESS 



MIND YOUR MANNERS 



MY SECRET STORY 



NIGHTBEAT 



JANE PICKENS SHOW 



ELMO ROPER 



SCARLET PIMPERNEL 



SHORT STORY 



SILENT MEN 



STARS IN KHAKI N BLUE 



3ILL STERN 



VOICES AND EVENTS 



WHITEHALL 1212 



MEREDITH WILLSON 



Family 



30 min. 5 wk $5,059 



Different daytime entertainment 



Forum 


Family 


30 


mln. 


1 wk 


$1,883 


yes 


Today's personalities quizzed by the press 




F . ir i j m 


Family 


30 


mln. 


l/wk 


$2,353 


yes 


Teenagers discuss youngsters problems 




Drama 


Family 


30 


min. 


1 wk 


$1,471 


yes 


Mr.ture. understanding stories for women 




Mystery 


Adult 


30 


m'n. 


l/wk 


$3,500 


y:s 


A Ch'cago newspaper man on the prowl for material 




Music 


Family 


15 


mln. 


5/wk 


$2,882 


yes 


Jane sings and interviews guests 




Commentary 


Family 


15 


min. 


1 wk 


$1,000 


y:s 


What people are thinking: political emphasis 




Drama 


Family 


30 


m'n. 


1 wk 


$2,942 


yes 


The Robin Hood of the French Revolution 




Drama 


Family 


30 


min. 


1 wk 


$2,941 


yes 


Best contemporary s'.iort stories 




Drama 


Family 


30 


m'n. 


l/wk 


Si.842 


yes 


Douglas Fairbanks, Jr.. stars 




Variety 


Family 


30 


min. 


1 wk 


$3,178 


yes 


Talent from the armed forces 




Sports 


Family 


10 


min. 


1 wk 


$1,530 


yes 


High-points from lives of sports figures 




News 


Family 


30 


min. 


1 wk 


$4,117 


yes 


Week's news, recorded on-the-scene 




Music 




30 


min 


1 wk 


$3,236 


yes 


Authentic Scotland Yard cases 




Mystery 




15 


min. 


5 wk 


$1,765 


yes 


Meredith's Music Room . . . music and chats 





510 MADISON 

i Continued from page 54 I 

project with such unwield) 
and wasteful sampling and 
tabulating procedures that the 
available funds simpl) could 
not finance a wholl) sound job 
of gathering the basic field 
data. 

2. Vlemon loss is a much smaller 
factor in well-conducted personal 
interviews than with mail ballots 
— and especiall) when, as with the 
NCS technique, completeness of re- 
call is aided b\ : 

la I Interviews with ever) avail- 
able member of the family, 

1 1>I Subsequent "Family Edit and 
Verification of a co|>\ of the 
original answers. 

3. Despite Mr. Bakers claims to the 
contrary, NCS achieves a substan- 
tial true probabilit) sample via a 



method developed in close collabo- 
ration with the U. S. Census Bu- 
reau, applauded by the country's 
leading researchers and fully ca- 
pable of mathematical proof. 

4. There's no "lack of uniformity" in 
the work of a full-time, thoroughly- 
trained and well supervised field 
staff when a properly designed 
sample and questionnaire are used. 

5. The NCS questions on program 
audiences can exert no influence on 
station answers, since they are 
asked only at the end of the inter- 
view, and specifically avoid any 
reference whatever to stations or 
networks. Incidentally, they refer 
to shows on all four networks — 
and not just one. as alleged by Mr. 
Baker. 

6. The under-statement of the true 
coverage of radio and TV stations 
b\ the inaccurate samples and 
methods of mail ballots will do 



more to damage the industry, more 
to "scare broadcasters.' than any 
straw men Mr. Baker creates. 
Lastly, we are accused of not serv- 
ing the individual stations needs. 
NCS. in fact, will report on more sta- 
tion data, with more comprehensive- 
ness, and more accuracy, than has ever 
been provided by any coverage service. 
Experienced researchers understand 
clearly that the advent of television 
created new 7 sampling and other tech- 
nical problems for researchers and 
rendered the use of mail ballots, for 
coverage measurements, not only obso- 
lete but positively dangerous and dam- 
aging to a great industry. Like every- 
thing else in a dynamic country, re- 
search moves steadily forward — aban- 
doning obsolete methods in favor of 
new. improved techniques designed to 
cope with changing conditions. 

A. C. Nielsen. President 
A. C. Nielsen Com pan) 



SERVING WE \S UN / EMPIRE Since 1924 

7< /T V 





WDBO 

580K.C 5000 WATTS WDB0-FM 92.3 MCS 34000 WATTS 



STILL WAY AHEAD! Central Flomlas Pioneer Uw Station 



1951 Retail Sales in the 21 WDBO counties totaled #616,908,000*. WDBO has approxi- 
mately 19,000 more daytime families and 17,000 more nighttime families who listen reg- 
ularly (6 or 7 days or nights a week) than the other 3 Orlando stations combined**. 
Hooper Rad«o Audience index — morning 44.0, afternoon 48.9, evening 41.2***. No 
increase in WDBO rates since 1946. 

* 1952 Sales Management ** Last BMB Report *** C. H. Hooper — Oct. -Nov. 1951 

WDBO, ORLANDO, FLORIDA — Natioial Representatives, BLAIR, CUMMIN<jS 




60 



SPONSOR 



THE HOUSEWIVES- 
PROTECTIVE LEAGUE 

485 MADISON AVE.. NEW YORK 
COLUMBIA SQUARE. LOS ANGELES 



ADMIRACION SHAMPOO 

ALLIED MOLASSES CO.. INC. 

ALLSTATE INSURANCE CO. 

ALL SWEET MARGARINE 

AMERICAN CHICLE CO. 

AMERICAN SAFETY RAZOR CORP. 

AMERICAN SECURITY & TRUST CO. 

ASBESTON IRON BOARD COVERS 

AVCO MANUFACTURING CORP. 

B & M BAKED BEANS 

BAMBY BREAD 

B IN B MUSHROOMS 

BIRDS EYE 

BLUE COAL 

BON AMI 

BONDGARDS CREAMERY 

THE BORDEN COMPANY 

BOSCO 

BOSTON GLOBE 

BRICK'S SOCIAL CLUB MINCE MEAT 

BRIGGS & CO. FRANKFURTERS 

BRISK 

CAPITOL FRITO CO. CORN CHIPS 

CENTENNIAL FLOUR 

CHEER 

COLLEGE INN FOOD PRODUCTS CO. 

COUNTRY SQUIRE TURKEYS 

DENNISON'S CHILI AND CATSUP 

DIET DELIGHT 

DINING CAR COFFEE 

DODGE DIVISION. CHRYSLER CORP. 

DOEHLA GREETING CARDS. INC. 

DOESKIN TISSUES 

DOWNYFLAKE WAFFLES 

DRANO 

DROMEDARY MIXES 

EARLY CALIFORNIA OLIVES 

ECONOMY CUP COFFEE 

EMBASSY DAIRY 

EMPIRE CRAFTS SILVER PLAN 

FELS & COMPANY 

FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN 

FLEISCHMANN'S YEAST 

FLORIDA CITRUS 

FORD MOTOR CO. 

FRANILLA ICE CREAM 

GALBRAITH'S LUMBER 

GAYMONT LAB. YOGURT 









7 


GENERAL ELECTRIC CO.. LAMPS 


PAL ORANGEADE 


GIBBS & COMPANY 


PEPSI-COLA 


GILLS HOTEL SPECIAL COFFEE 


PEQUOT MILLS 


1. J. GRASS NOODLE CO.. INC. 


PETER PAUL. INC. 


1 GRIFFIN SHOE POLISH 


PEVELY DAIRY PRODUCTS 


G. WASHINGTON COFFEE 


PHILADELPHIA DAIRY PRODUCTS 


HABITANT SOUP CO. 


PIONEER LAUNDRY 


HANDI FOOD PRODUCTS CO. 


PLYMOUTH ROCK GELATINE 


HELLMANN'S MAYONNAISE 


RAYEX 


HENACRES POULTRY FARM 


REALEMON 


HILLMAN MINX 


RED DEVIL SOOT REMOVER 


HILLS BROS. COFFEE 


REDDI-WIP 


HIRES ROOT BEER 


ROCKINGHAM POULTRY CO. 


HOLIDAY BRANDS SOLUBLE COFFEE 


SANDWICK'S CANDIES 


HOLIDAY MAGAZINE 


SANITARY RUG CO. 


HOME-STYLE FROZEN WAFFLES 


SCRIBBANS-KEMP BISCUITS 


H-0 OATS 


SEARS ROEBUCK & CO. 


HOOD RUBBER COMPANY 


SEASIDE LIMA BEANS 
SEVEN-UP 


■ «^ ^^ ■ * w ** fc^ »■• t\ vwi || Mil ■ 

HOOD'S MILK CO. 


HOT SHOPPES 


F. H. SNOW CANNING CO.. INC. 


HOYT BROTHERS PIE MIXES 


SOFSKIN CREME 


INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER CO. 


SO GOOD POTATO CHIP CO. 


INTERWOVEN STOCKING CO. 


SPANDY 


IODENT TOOTH PASTE 


STOKELY-VAN CAMP. INC. 


JELKE'S GOOD LUCK MARGARINE 


SUNKIST LEMONS 


JERMAN BROTHERS. INC. 


SURE-Ja 


HERB JONES SCOURING CLOTH 


SWANS DOWN FLOUR 


JOY HOSIERY MILLS 


SWEETHEART SOAP 


JUICE INDUSTRIES 


SWIFT & COMPANY 


KEN-L-PRODUCTS DOG FOOD 


TEDDYS SEA FOOD 


KENU 


TIDE 


KIPLINGER LETTER 


TIP-TOP BREAD 


KREY PACKING CO. 


TIP TOP ORANGE JUICE 


LA CHOY 


TOUCANS JUICES 


LADIES' HOME JOURNAL 


TRENO DETERGENT 


LA FRANCE 


UNIVERSAL TRADING RECORDS 


LAVA SOAP 


U. S. SCHOOL OF MUSIC 


LIBBY. Me NEILL & LIBBY 


VESS BEVERAGES 


LION BRAND PAINTS 


WASHINGTON FLOUR 


LITE SOAP 


WASHINGTON STATE APPLES 


LOOK MAGAZINE 


WASHINGTON STATE FRUITS 


| LYON VAN & STORAGE CO. 


WESTERN BEET SUGAR 


FRANK MANN POTATO CHIPS 


WHIRLPOOL WASHERS 


MARCEL PAPER MILLS. INC. 


WHITE STAR TUNA 


METROPOLITAN FEDERAL SAVINGS 


WHITING'S MILK 


METROPOLITAN POULTRY CO. 


WILBERT'S WAX 


MILANI FOODS SALAD DRESSINGS 


WILKINS COFFEE 


MILNOT 


WILSON'S EVAPORATED MILK 


Me CRORY'S STORES. INC. 


WINDEX 


NATIONAL BISCUIT CO. 


WOODWARD & LOTHROP 


NESTEA 


YOUNGSTOWN KITCHENS 


; NUCOA 


YUBAN COFFEE 


O-CEL-O SPONGES 

OLSON RUG CO. j 


ZENITH HEARING AIDS 




OTTENBERG'S BAKERS 






--^^^^^^^^™ 



HAPPY TENANTS: These I ~>6 advertisers — oil current or recent users 

of The Housewives' Protective League — have found that it's the most 
sales-effective participating pr ogram in all broadcasting . We can make 

room for you. too. Just call "the program that sponsors the product" . . . 
THE HOUSEWIVES' PROTECTIVE LEAGUE PLaza 5-2000, N.Y.C.-Hollywood 9-1212, Los Vngeles 



11 

DIFFERENT 
STATIONS 



WSPD 




TOLEDO 



Toledo's most powerful radio sta- 
tion, WSPD is the voice of authority 
on the radios owned by 98% of Toledo's 
300,000 retail buyers. Advertisers who want 
more than their share of the Toledo market, 
get on WSPD. 



WWVA 

WHEELING 



kW. VA./ Blanketing the industrial heart of 

America, WWVA brings big results. 
Four announcements from Wheeling's far- 
reaching, 50,000 watt station pulled 11,300 
mail replies from 25 states. CBS in Wheeling, 
WWVA is a natural for better coverage and 
eye-opening sales results. 



WGBS 



MIAMI 



The "spendingest" market in 
Florida is blanketed by WGBS, 
Miami's only 50,000 watt outlet. 
With popular CBS programming for a whop- 
ping city and retail trading area of over 
427,000, this dominating voice is tops in 
sound selling. 



WJBK 

"^*> DETROIT 




Tigers and Baseball and Detroit and 
WJBK all go round together. It's 
Detroit's popular sports, news, and music 
station where folks who like better entertain- 
ment set their dials. For a better buy, better 
try WJBK. 



WSAI 

00 i CINCINNATI 

^^"'V' Progressive Cincinnati buys by 

WSAI, basic ABC station. Broadcasting better 
programs on a full-time regional channel, 
WSAI fans out through a- sound, substantial 
market where the business index climbs 
steadily up. Let WSAI put your product into 
this growing Ohio market. 



WMMN 



FAIRMONT 

The most powerful radio station in 
eastern West Virginia, WMMN sells families 
in a thriving industrial area as well as a fertile 
agricultural region. A natural for farm or 
urban products, WMMN will carry your sales 
message to the people who buy. 




WAGA 

ATLANTA 

\ 

WAGA is a habit for Atlanta 
radio listeners. The CBS radio 
outlet, WAGA puts programs 

and products in the 83,750 radio homes in 

this million dollar market. 



KEYL-TV 1 WJBK-TV 

rv SAN ANTONIO § <^ DETROIT 

^r - ' Texas \ THREE networks, ONE station . . . 

Vrv Jr KEYL-TV offers the high Hooper 

\ { programs of CBS and ABC and 

^ Du 



iMont to San Antonio's 119,380 
buying households. The third largest city in 
the first largest state, San Antonio is the pick 
of wise advertisers who want their products 
carried home. 



Most Detroiters keep their dials 
set to WJBK-TV because top TV 
shows are normal for this popular 
CBS and DuMont outlet. It's a best buy for 
advertisers with an eye on this rich 102 
million dollar Detroit retail market. 



'it I** 



u 



WAGA-TV 1 WSPD-TV 



GA. 



ATLANTA 



Booming retail sales in Atlanta make 
WAGA-TV a best buy for adver- 
tisers who want results. With retail sales in- 
creased over 6 times their 1940 total, WAGA- 
TV offers you a top sales opportunity in a 
fast growing market. 



OHIO 



TOLEDO 



Toledo's only television outlet, 
WSPD-TV covers the third largest 
of the eight major Ohio retail markets. Affili- 
ated with all networks, this popular station 
is the effective way of reaching Toledo's 
438,000,000 retail dollars. 




Does your product need a climate that's hot . . . 
or cold? Should the market be urban or rural . . . 
large or small? Whichever it is there's a top-value 
Storer Station to sell your product successfully! 
In broadcasting-and telecasting too— wide-awake 
programming and friendly service have built 
enthusiastic audiences. So put your product on 
Storer Stations . . . stations where wise buyers 
hear what wise sellers have to say. 




STORER BROADCASTING COMPANY 

WSPD, Toledo, O. • WWVA, Wheeling, W. Va. • WMMN, Fairmont, W. Vo. • WAGA, Atlanta, Go. 
WGBS, Miami, Fla. • WJBK, Detroit, Mich. • WSAI, Cincinnati, O. 

WSPD-TV, Toledo, O. • WJBK-TV, Detroit, Mich. • WAGA-TV, Atlanta, Ga. • KEYL-TV, San Antonio, Tex. 

NATIONAL SALES HEADQUARTERS: 
488 Madison Ave., New York 22, Eldorado 5-2455 • 230 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 1, FRanklin 2-6498 



ONE OF THE NATION S jf 4 
TOP INDEPENDENTS 



■ 




Year after year, the nation's top advertisers use WNEB for 

effective selling in the rich Worcester area. For example, WNEB 

has 1952 contracts with the following accounts: 



Foods 


Drugs 




General 


Amazo 


Anacin 




Camels 


Autocrat Coffee 


Anahist 




Carling's Beer & Ale 


Birds Eye Products 


Bayer Aspirin 




Charmin Tisue 


Borden's Instant Coffee 


Bromo-Seltzer 




Chesterfield 


Chase & Sanborn Instant Coffee 


Chlorodent Too 


th Paste 


Diamond Match 


Contadina Tomato Paste 


Doan's Pills 










Holiday Magazine 


Eclipse Coffee Syrup 


Ex-Lax 






First National Stores 




Hughes Aircraft 


Franco-American Spaghetti 


Feenamint 




International Harvester 


Hood's Ice Cream 


4-Way Cold Tc 


blets 


Ladies Home Journal 


Hood's Milk 


Histoplus 




Metro Goldwyn Mayer 


International Salt 


Musterole 




Monsanto Chemical 


Jelke Good Luck Margarine 


Pepsodent 




Narrangansett Beer & Ale 


Jello 


Pepto-Bismol 




New England Coke 


Lipton Frostee 


Pomatex 




New York Sunday News 


Lipton Iced Tea 


Pertussin 




Sylvania Electric 


Mrs. Filbert's Margarine 


Shadow Wave 




Touraine Paints 


Nucoa 

Pan American Coffee Bureau 






Vicks Cough Drops 


United Aircraft 


Post's Cornfetti 


Vicks Cough Sy 


rup 


Viking Snuff 


Presto Cake Flour 


Vicks Vatronol 






Squire's Arlington Ham 


Automotive 




Gasoline 


Sterling Salt 








Tenderleaf Tea 


Chevrolet 




Amoco 


Victor Coffee 


DeSoto 




Atlantic 


Whiting Milk 


Ford 




Esso 



You're In Good Company on WNEB 




WORCESTER 
MASSACHUSETTS 



Your Best- Buy In New England's Third Largest Market 
Represented by. THE BOLLING COMPANY, INC. 



64 



SPONSOR 




radio 




Billings continue to mount 

Spot radio, the only national ad medium which ha* shown a 
steady upward growth in hillings over the past 16 years, is 
still growing at a rapid rate. However, many new techniques 
are being used, cost pictures have changed, and the avail- 
ability outlook has altered since last year. 

Unlike radio networks, whose strength used to lie in the 
evening hours of peak listening, spot radio has not been 
shaken firmly by TV competition. Stations have built up 
their morning and daytime schedules until they are selling 
all the choice availabilities in these hours as fast as they 
appear. Rates are being altered, with the outlook being for 
reduced nighttime costs and increases in the mornings and 
afternoons. 

The scope of sponsor's Spot Radio section reveals how 
such changes will affect the plans of spot clients, and change 
the buying habits of ad agencies. Shown, too, are the latest 
facts of such hot spot topics as merchandising, fall business, 
trends in local-level programing, promotional tie-ups, results 
from using spot radio, regional network trends, transcriptions. 

At right, sponsor's Spot Radio section is indexed for 
handy reference. Study of the contents will prove of value 
to any sponsor with spot radio in his fall plans. 

14 JULY 1952 



Spot radio availabilities 


Mi 


Rate outlook 


07 


Kusiness outlook 


BR 


Merchandising 


70 


Spot radio fundamental* 


73 


Spot radio programing 


71 


Transeriptions 


76 


Library .services 


HO 


Regional networks 


82 


Foreign language market 


85 


l^egro market 


90 


Transit radio 


91 


FM 


92 


Storeeasting 


93 


Co-op radio 


95 


Top spot agencies 


90 



65 




& Value W(& 



a, 



Fim Products Recwmeiu!* 



***■ 






PHILIP NORMAN . n KNX 

ON THE HOUSEWIVES' PROTECTIVE LEAGUE 
AND STARLIGHT SALUTE PROGRAMS 



MONDAY THRU! OA 1A OA 

SATURDAY... lIOO PM. & 10:30 PM 



m.™,"'" §■ 



f^JM 




SSSBiKJfcnuii ag 


'FOV 


v 



r'js&^Sfig?] 



PRODUCTS 
OF MERIT 



'Qj.01 




a 










%«/«•»»<•!/ interest in spot radio is on upbeat as stations intensify merchandising 



KRSC's Bill Simpson (left, with easel) and Clark Company's John 
Stewart explain the details of this Seattle station's merchandising 
plans to N. W. Ayer timebuyer Carol Sleeper. Merchandising has 
given big boost to volume of spot radio billings in many markets 



At top is typical in-store merchandising poster used in conjunction 
with KNX's "HPL" and "Starlight Saluate" shows. Below, a drug- 
store in the WLW listening area blossoms with tie-in merchandising 
linked to a battery of shows and talent. WLW is veteran merchandiser 



Availabilities 



Q. What will the situation be this 
fall regarding spot radio availabili- 
ties? 

A. After surveying the leading station 
reps, as to their availabilities, and a 
group of leading ad agencies, as to 
their buying intentions, this is what 
SPONSOR found to be the picture for 
fall spot radio buying: 

1. Morning time: Since early- 
morning radio has been practically un- 
hurt by TV, even in the biggest video 
markets, the low prices, big results, and 
growing circulation of morning radio 
has made it the most popular spot buy 
in sijdit. 

The tightest squeeze is in finding 
good availabilities for minute an- 
nouncements and chainbreaks, plus 
good participation slots, between the 
hours of 7:00 a.m. and 8:00 a.m. Here, 



tlie growth of television seems to have 
no effect on agency requests, for the 
situation is even tighter in big TV 
markets like New York, Chicago, Los 
Angeles than it is in non-TV areas. On 
a long list of the country's best-known, 
big-power stations, the hard-to-find- 
time problems start at 6:00 a.m. and 
end as late as 9:00 a.m. 

Most asked for item: "Good slots in 
well-rated morning newscasts, or next 
to newscasts." Second choice: "Well- 
rated 'Morning, Men' or wake-up 
shows." 

2. Late a.m., afternoons: The squeeze 
play begins to ease up in the late morn- 
ings, tightens around the noon hour, 
and eases again in the afternoon. An- 
nouncements slotted next to the high- 
est-rated daytime network shows are 
hard to place on key stations, and some 
stations even double-spot to fit them in. 

Reps and stations are becoming 
aware that advertisers want more than 



66 



just a set of ratings, or even cost-per- 
1.000 figures when they buy. Most of 
them now make morning and after- 
noon pitches on the basis of the audi- 
ence compositions for the time slots, 
without waiting for the advertiser to 
ask for these figures, particularly 
where the audience is primarily female 
and the advertiser is a food or soap 
manufacturer. 

Some stations and reps are going in 
strongly for "groups" or "packages" 
of afternoon spot availabilities, with 
attractive card-rate discounts because 
of the stepped-up dollar volume. These 
are being pitched strongly to the larger 
agencies who have household product 
accounts or food accounts. Many deals 
in this category were reported to SPON- 
SOR for fall starts, at card rates. 

Also, stations are grooming their 
own "service" shows (homemaking, 
cooking, local news, interviews in the 
afternoons, and are winning a lot of 

SPONSOR 



new listeners and air advertisers to 
this segment of spot buying. 

3. Evenings, late p.m.: During eve- 
ning schedules, once the toughest spot 
time to clear, most of the easy-to-get 
availabilities occur. This is primarily 
because TVs greatest strength and 
deepest inroads have been during the 
hours of 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. 

Prior to 7:30. newscasts are much in 
demand as are some early-evening local 
shows. These shows generally have a 
high ratio of males to females in the 
audience, since they reach family heads 
just around the supper hour, or driv- 
ing home from work. Announcement 
slots next to these shows are also popu- 
lar, with best-rated ones hard to get. 

During the main part of the night- 
time schedule, with a lot of evening 
time for sale on the networks and a 
lot of holes in network evening pro- 
gram schedules, there is a wide choice 
of availabilities of all types. Here 
again the "package" deal is a big item, 
with reps offering card-rate discounts 
that run as high as 50% for a big 
group of announcement slots primari- 
ly in evening slots. These are often 
a good buy for advertisers, reps point 
out. since any losses of audience to 
TV is largely counterbalanced by the 
"wholesale" price that's being paid. 

Late-night and all-night disk-jockey 
participations are becoming more pop- 



ular with advertisers; the best-rated 
shows are virtualK sold out. 



Kale outlook 

Q. What's likely to be true this 
fall of spot radio rates? 

A. \s compiled l>\ sponsor's staff, 
opinions on spot rates ranged all the 
\sa\ from the optimistic views of 
\AIMSK I "Present rates will con- 
tinue" I to a station sales executive who 
predicted gloomilv that "there are al- 
mosl certainly going to be some rate 
cuts h\ stations at night, particularly 
in T\ areas." 

Generally, this was how the situation 
shaped up for fall : 

1. Morning, daytime rales: The 
trend in morning rates is upward. 
Once considered more or less "mar- 
ginal, the morning hours of 6:00 to 
0:00 a.m. have been growing in value. 
This is due primarily to the lack of TV 
competition in these hours, the increase 
in "secondary set" listening (kitchens, 
bedrooms), and the over-all growth of 
radio homes. 

Some of the price increases in morn- 
ing spot radio this fall will be outright 
revisions of the rate schedule, both in 
and out of TV areas. However, on 
many stations, such as those repre- 
sented by the NBC and CBS spot sales 
divisions, the price hikes will come in 



the shape of reclassifications of time. 
It's going to work out something like 
this: If you've been holding down a 
spot at 7:30 a.m. on a station that's 
reclassifying, you tnaj find that the 
start of. say, Class "B" lime has been 
rolled back from eight o'clock to seven 
o'clock, and your original time slot 
has moved into the next higher cate- 
gorj on the rate card. 

Whether the price is increased or 
(he time reclassified it will work out to 
virtually the same thing for the adver- 
tiser. The choice is a diplomatic one, 
and largely up to the station. You can 
get an idea of what these rates ma\ 
look like h\ comparing the differences 
between Class "C" and "D," or be- 
tween class "B" and "C" on the rate 
cards of several large radio stations. 

Spot rates for late morning or after- 
noon availabilities are likelv to remain 
at practically the same level this fall as 
they were this spring. 

2. Evening, nighttime rates: Here, 
the trend is the reverse of the situa- 
tion in morning and daytime radio. 
The bulk of radio research has shown 
that, with a few notable exceptions, the 
listening to nighttime radio is sagging. 

Therefore, the adjustments in night- 
time spot radio rates will tend to be 
down. These will not always be a 
straight "reduction" in rates. Again, 
they may be reclassifications in a few 
places. In cost cases, however, adver- 



NARTSR clinics allow exchange of knowledge between agencies, 
clients, reps. Picture below shows session at which Bill Eastham 
(standing right), Lever Bros, brand advertising manager was guest 
of honor. Others (I. to r.) include George Brett, Kati Agency; Tom 
Flanagan, NARTSR; Robert Eastman, Blair: Fred Neuberth, Avery- 
Knodel. Sitting Martin Beck, Katz; Jones Scovern, Free & Peters 



Veteran agencyman C. L. Miller, C. L. Miller Co. (second from left) 
at another NARTSR spot radio clinic-luncheon. Others (I. to r.) are 
Arthur McCoy, Avery-Knodel; Tom Flanagan, and Jones Scovern. 
NARTSR's philosophy in sporsoring sessions is that both buyer and 
seller benefit when there is systematic discussion of the advertiser's 
needs. Then reps salesmen can service their clients accordingly 




tisei> will be offered "package" deals 
— at card rates — which amount to the 
same thing, rather than rate cuts. 

Some of these deals will come in at 
dollar-volume discounts that run as 
high as 50 r v . with the average being 
about 20 r /f . The sales argument is 
simple: the money that's saved in buy- 
ing a big schedule of nighttime spot 
announcements counterbalances any 
general loss of audience. In some 
rases, "packages" of announcements on 
individual stations may run as low as 
10 a week. Usually, they'll be sold in 
groups of 21 or more, sometimes on a 
"fixed" I advertiser's choice! schedule; 
sometimes on a "floating" (station's 
choice of whatever's open I schedule. 

All increases or decreases, day or 
night, are expected to be realistic in 
terms of cost-per- 1.000. 



Q. Will there be many "deals" 
in spot radio this fall? 

A. So long as some 2.350 radio sta- 
tion compete against each other and 
against TV for their share of the spot 
radio dollar, there will be under-the- 
counter deals. However, the expectancy 
for fall is that advertisers who insist 



CLEVELAND 

WSRS 

"The Family Station" 

CLEVELAND'S 

ONLY 

NEWS STATION 

ON THE AIR 

24 HOURS DAILY 

'ROUND THE CLOCK 

WSRS 

LOCAL NEWS EVERY 

SIXTY MINUTES ON THE 

HALF HOUR DAY & NIGHT 

"The Family Station" 

WSRS 

CLEVELAND 

NATL. REP. FORJOE & CO. 



on using bargain-basement tactics in 
shopping for radio buys will find the 
going tougher. 

By fall 1952 most of the leading ra- 
dio stations will have made adjust- 
ments in everything from rate card 
prices and time classifications to dis- 
count structures and local talent fees. 
Some have trimmed their sails pretty 
tightly, and with the NARTB and 
NARTSR looking on watchfully, are 
not likely to cut am further. 



Business outlook 






Q. How does spot business shape 
up for fall? 

A. From the standpoint of both buy- 
ers and sellers of spot radio, the pic- 
ture is optimistic. From veteran ad- 
vertisers with multi-million dollar bud- 
gets to relative newcomers with modest 
radio allotments, admen are looking 
at spot radio with renewed interest. 
The rapid development of local day- 
time programing, local personalities, 
and local merchandising by radio sta- 
tions in and out of TV areas has cre- 
ated added interest in spot radio. Too. 
there are signs of a swing back from 
TV, both network and spot. 

Stations and radio station reps, who 
fought an uphill battle during the past 
season against everything from spot 
TV to radio networks with spot-like 
sales vehicles, are understandably 
pleased with the fall outlook. 

Said an executive of one of the 
network-owned station rep organiza- 
tions: "Last year, around this time, we 
were witnessing a parade of spot ad- 
tisers who were dropping out of spot 
radio because of TV. Many wanted to 
experiment in TV spot; a few were 
trying to balance the costs of high- 
priced network TV. New business was 
hard to flush out of the bushes — I 
guess we didn't sound very enthusias- 
tic. How could we? 

"Today, things are different. We've 
had a bumper crop of renewals that 
have carried us right through a strong 
summer, with more renewals due for 
fall. In addition, we've had a substan- 
tial number of our 'old customers'— 
many of them returning to us from 
TV — coming back. This is particu- 
larly true of food advertisers, who have 
been attracted back to spot, radio be- 
cause of recentlj stepped-up merchan- 



dising at the various stations. 

"A lot of new clients, too. will be 
on our books for fall. Some of these 
are veteran advertisers who have never 
used spot radio before, and are coming 
to it because of the strength of our 
sales stories and successes. Some of 
them are new-product advertisers, who 
are using spot radio to help launch 
new goods and services, since it's easv 
to match spot radio to distribution 
patterns. ' 

Another veteran station rep put it 
this way to sponsor: "In the earlv 
days of radio's growth, the networks 
signed deals with stations which gave 
to the networks the choice evening 
hours and daylight hours. We were 
lucky to stay alive by selling what local 
programs were left, plus adjacencies to 
the network vehicles. 

"This fall, the shoe's on the other 
foot. Sponsors are asking for davtime 
or morning spot radio, local newscasts, 
evening saturation campaigns and the 
growing number of well-rated local 
shows. The potential for growth has 
turned in favor of spot. And, the net- 
works no longer look upon us as a 
kind of bargain-basement operation. 
They compete with us every step of the 
way for the radio ad dollar." 



Q. Will the lineup of spot radio 
advertisers this fall be virtually the 
same as last fall? 

A. Several leading advertisers — from 
Hudson Pulp & Paper to the auto 
manufacturers — will be much more 
heavily in spot radio, having experi- 
mented freely in TV and found it not 
always suitable to either their problems 
or their ad budgets. This TV "turn- 
over" is likely to continue until fa) 
everyone has tried TV, or (b) every- 
one has made up his mind about it. 

At the same time, there will be sev- 
eral new categories of spot advertisers 
on the air in radio this fall, principallv 
among the booming crop of chloro- 
phyll products and new agricultural 
products. Since spot radio is not re- 
stricted to TV areas, but at the same 
time can be held down to areas in 
which distribution is being achieved, 
it's still one of the best choices in the 
national media line-up for the intro- 
duction of new products. 



Q. What national advertisers are 



68 



SPONSOR 




brings you a NtW approach 
to the OREGON Market 



The picture has changed in Portland — KWJJ, Oregon's most 
powerful independent station, now presents a bigger and bet- 
ter buy than ever before. Here is what has been happening. 



NEW Ownership 



The station has been purchased by 
Rod F. Johnson and its management reorganized for improved program- 
ming and service. 

NEW Programs 

KWJJ has added new programs, both transcribed and live talent to 
produce a new program schedule which has unlimited variety and in- 
creased family popularity. 

NEW Merchandising Service 

KWJJ has always stressed its merchandising service to advertisers. Now 
a whole new program of special promotions and merchandising plans is 
offered to help make your campaign on KWJJ more effective. 

NEW National Representatives 

KWJJ now offers increased coverage of the national field through the 
many offices of its new representatives, Weed and Company. Contact 
them for detailed facts on KWJJ's Billion Dollar Market. 



KWJJ 



10,000 watts 



Oregon's Most Powerful Independent Station 



National Representatives 

WEED AND COMPANY 

New York. Chicago, Detroit. Boston 
Atlanta, Hollywood, San Francisco 



Studio and Offices 

1011 S. W. 6th Avenue 

PORTLAND 4, OREGON 



Phone ATwater 4393 



"SPOT" Your Campaign on 
Portland's "Family Station". 

You don't need "BIG MONEY" to 
spot your sales message in Portland's 
market. KWJJ wide coverage, popu- 
larity and program variety offer the 
perfect vehicle for "Spots that Pull." 
Tie in with top news, sports, music, 
features and record programs that 
lead in audience appeal. 




1080 on Your Dial 



14 JULY 1952 



69 



buying heavily in spot radio for 
fall? 

A. According to a sponsor checkup 
among station representatives and ad 
agencies, these categories of adver- 
tisers are expected to be most active in 
spot radio this fall: 

Soaps — The postwar boom in de- 
tergents, paced by P&G's Tide, is con- 
tinuing, but the competition — Lever's 
Surf. Colgate's Vel — is beginning to 
make a strong showing. The battle is 
on constantly in all major media, with 
the major soap firms shuffling around 
their spot radio schedules for deter- 
ments, and even for their standard soap 
brands. There's usually a steady, 52- 
week "basic" campaign going for most 
of them, supplemented by periodic 
splashes that involve heavy spot radio 
geared to special contests, merchan- 
dising drives, or coupon "sampling" 
deals. Several of the major soap firms, 
particularly P&G and Colgate, who 
trimmed their spot radio in TV areas 
last year, are beginning to move back 
into the video cities with increased 
spot radio. 

Drugs — Hottest are the new rash of 
< hlorophyll products — from toothpaste 
to dog deodorizers. The advance pre- 



dictions for fall indicate that they will 
be as big a buyer of spot radio time 
and programs as the anti-histamine 
products were a couple of seasons ago. 

The regular drug advertisers in spot 
radio — the patent medicines, the laxa- 
tives, the analgesics — are expected 
back this fall in somewhat greater 
numbers and with larger campaigns 
than last year. Traditionally, when 
drug sales are good, drug advertising 
booms. And. drug sales have held up 
well during 1952. 

Later in the fall, although much of 
the buying is being done now, the 
cough-and-cold remedies, such as Per- 
tussin and the cough drop firms, will 
be in spot radio in Northern markets, 
working southward as the season pro- 
gresses. 

Foods — Always one of the major 
advertising groups in spot radio, the 
food product firms are expected to be 
even larger this fall than they were 
last. For one thing, increased national 
income has meant more food spending, 
and a higher standard of living for 
more people. This, in turn, leads to 
competition for "new" family cate- 
gories, and for rural consumers. Also, 
food advertisers have turned to day- 





IN MIAMI NOW! 




If you still think Miami's merely 
a "Winter Resort "...take a look at 
these figures from the Miami and 
Miami Beach Convention Bureaus! 

227 Conventions Booked April Through 
November Of This Year! 

212,455 Conventioners From Everywhere 
Will Attend These 227 Conventions! 

$25,932,970.00 Is A Conservative 
Estimate Of The Number Of Dollars 
These Conventioners Will Spend Here! 

And. ..remember, all this is in 
addition to our thousands of 
Summer Tourists and our half a 
million year-round residents! 
Get your share of this big. 
bustling all -season business! 
WIOD can get it for you. Just let 
your Hollingbery man fill you in 
on the details. 



James M. LeGate, General Manager 

5,000 WATTS • 610 KC - 

National Rep., George P. Hollingbery Co 




time and morning radio to sell every- 
thing from breakfast cereals and cof- 
fee to cake mixes, as the strength of 
daylight-hour radio has grown. 

Spot radio has begun to look more 
and more attractive to food advertisers 
because of the stepped-up merchan- 
dising campaigns now being waged by 
radio stations in all parts of the coun- 
try. In the competitive field of super- 
market selling — where a product sells 
or doesn't on a combination of good 
packaging, good displays, and good 
advertising pre-sell — food advertisers 
are aware that guaranteed merchan- 
dising tie-ins can do a lot to increase 
the power of advertising. 

So far, the biggest pushes in station 
merchandising have been in the direc- 
tion of promoting food items, and the 
major accounts are beginning to sit 
up and take notice. 

Others — None of the advertisers in 
the automotive, appliance or other 
hard goods classes is willing to make a 
prediction about spot radio expendi- 
tures for fall. Their plans are "iffy"- — ■ 
if shortages in vital materials do not 
develop, if the armed forces require- 
ments do not cut too deeply into civil- 
ian production, if labor situations can 
be straightened out. 

Movie advertising in spot radio is 
expected to jump upwards, as is the 
spot air advertising done by magazines 
and publishing houses. Spot radio 
usage by retail firms, or retail chains 
like Sears or Ward is expected to be 
heavier than last year. Beer and soft 
drinks will be at least as strong as last 
season. 



Merchandising 

Q. What developments in station 
merchandising are expected this 
fall? 

A. Virtually all major radio outlets, 
in or out of TV areas, will have a sta- 
tion merchandising operation this fall, 
or will have one operating soon after. 
This is a statement that's true today: 
it certainly wasn't a few short years 
ago. A few pioneer stations like WLW, 
Cincinnati; WWVA, Wheeling; WR- 
VA, Richmond; WFAA. Dallas; WLS, 
Chicago; WJR, Detroit; WFIL, Phila- 
delphia and others have long done pe- 
riodic or regular merchandising drives. 
But for the first time now the trend is 
in all classes of I 1 . S. markets. 

Merchandising has boomed at the 



70 



SPONSOR 



station level because of a combination 
of pressures. Television has made a 
dent in the revenue of radio stations — 
in and out of video markets — since 
many advertisers took their TV money 
away from radio spot. Also, with the 
number of AM and FM outlets in the 
U. S. constantly growing the scramble 
for the advertiser's dollar has become 
more harried. 

In a few cases, merchandising is 
being offered by hard-put radio sta- 
tions as a kind of come-on to advertis- 
ers, instead of rate-cuts. This is a prac- 
tice frowned on by the station rep trade 
group, NARTSR. At the same time, 
the American Association of Adver- 
tising Agencies, currently drafting a 
station-agency code of ethical practices, 
is keeping a sharp eye out for agencies 
who demand merchandising as a con- 
dition of buying time or programs. 

Space doesn't permit a listing of 
those radio stations who, individually, 
are organizing merchandising drives. 
They range from the merchandising- 
plus - personal - appearances done by 
KGW in non-TV Portland. Oregon, to 
the smooth-clicking radio merchandis- 
ing-plus-contests organized by WTOP 
in TV-conscious Washington, D. C. 
Across the nation, you'll find all types 
and sizes of stations merchandising 
throughout their listening areas, and 
boosting ad impact beyond TV limits. 

Newest and hottest trend in spot ra- 
dio merchandising has been the or- 
ganizing and operating of merchandis- 
ing "packages" by station reps, which 
cover all or several of the stations they 
represent. Typical big-time efforts in 
this respect are the "Chain Lightning" 
operation of NBC's Spot Radio Sales 
branch, and the "Supermarketing" 
drives of CBS' Radio Sales. Intensi- 
fied merchandising efforts are also be- 
ing promoted these days by other sta- 
tion reps, from Avery-Knodel to Weed 
& Company, featuring tie-ins with food 
chains, drug chains, retail stores. 

These merchandising operations are 
truly big-time deals. They call for an 
advertiser to spend a minimum amount 
in a minimum period (example: $1,500 
a week net for 13 weeks on WNBC, 
New York, as part of "Chain Light- 
ning") and in return guarantee him 
various point-of-sale promotions. These 
include counter displays, island dis- 
plays, shelf promotions, preferred po- 
sitions, window promotions, and the 
like, plus a featuring in the store's (or 
chain's) advertising in other media. 



Where Can You Buy 
Average Ratings of 24.0? 




Right now you're looking at the home of College Radio — "campus- 
limited"' stations managed and operated by students for students. Sixty- 
one college radio stations make up the Intercollegiate Broadcasting 
System. These stations offer not only a great educational opportunity 
for the undergraduates, but also an unexcelled medium for the adver- 
tiser to reach the college student. 

H lien you sell a college statical, you've got a lifetime 

customer! There are 6,000,000 college graduates living today, and 

the college halls embrace 2. HI 10.(11 H I undergraduates. The rnllege market 

is the best "heeled" and certainly the most influential group in the 

country today. 

The time to influence this group is when they are in college. If it is a 

product you are selling, remember brand preferences formed in these 

years may very well be lasting! If you have an institutional message, 

present it while they are in college! 

College years are the years for assimilating knowledge and ideas. It 

is a time of preparation for life. It is a formative period. Form their 

buying habits — for your product — while they're in college! 

You buy average ratings of '2. 1. 0! The most effective way 

of reaching and selling the college student is through his or her own 

college radio station. Like pep rallies and proms, campus broadcasting 

is an integral part of college life. 

Proof of this rests in the fact that recent audience surveys show that the 

average time period on a college station enjoys a rating of 24.0. Add to 

this consistently high rating the intense loyalty of the listeners, and 

you know you have an advertising medium magna cum laudel 

You can buy any of the 61 IBS affiliates individually or as a group. 

For complete market data and information regarding IBS facilities, 

programs, coverage and rates, contact the IBS representative. 



Intercollegiate Broadcasting System 

The Thomas F. Clark Co., Inc. 

205 East 42nd Street, New York 17, New York 
35 E. Wacker Drive Chicago, Illinois 

3049 E. Grand Blvd. Detroit, Michigan 



14 JULY 1952 



71 




The first round of such merchandis- 
ing deals has produced startling re- 
sults. The head of one large grocery 
chain on the Eastern seaboard, for in- 
stance, who had participated in a re- 
cent station merchandising campaign, 
reported that the sales of featured 
products were up anywhere "from 
Id' i lu 200' < '" as a result. Local sales 
increases, on a few occasions, have hit 
as much as 400^- and have held up 
well after the promotions. This is the 
kind of sales story which makes practi- 
cal sense to advertisers — particularly 
food manufacturers or those who sell 
in supermarkets, or drug chains. 

The trend in American retailing of 
food products and drug products since 
World War II has been toward large, 
self-service stores where displays are 
usually equalized and advertising 
pushes largely neutralized. Therefore, 
the aggressiveness of stations and reps 
in lining up store chains for joint 
radio-retailing promotions has brought 
many new advertisers to spot radio, 
and has added to the over-all value of 
spot as an advertising medium. 



Q. What are some representative 
examples of spot radio merchan- 
dising by stations? 

A. Here are capsule summaries of the 
merchandising activities oi just a few 
radio stations which are carrying their 
advertising impact far bevond the ra- 
dio loudspeaker: 

1. WLW, Cincinnati, is a real pio- 
neer in station merchandising, has 
been active for over a dozen years. No 
fewer than 26 major merchandising 
services — from in-store displays to 
sales research — are handled by the 
giant Midwestern outlet, and are avail- 
able to advertisers. A recent, station- 
wide campaign in WLW's four-state 
area was called "Parade of Stars." and 
featured the TV outlet in addition to 
the AM station. Some 5,000 grocers 
participated, using special promotion 
kits and a wide variety of display ma- 
terial to back up some 65 featured 
grocery products. As always, the WLW 
month-long drive boosted the sales of 
all the products involved. 

2. WISN, Milwaukee, recently cele- 
brated its 30th birthday as a station, 
and the 10th anniversary of a happy 
partnership with the drug chains in its 
areas. Airing a weekly-quartcr-hour 
show called Knotv Your Druggist Bet- 
ter, WISN has done much to point up 



Storer Broadcasting Company 



Represented Nationally 
by KATZ 



SPONSOR 



the druggist's role in the community. 
In return, the druggists have cooper- 
ated over and over again with the sta- 
tion in handling special drug merchan- 
dising campaigns for WISN-advertised 
products. The Milwaukee outlet also 
services grocers and druggists with 
regular dealer bulletins, merchandis- 
ing ideas, helps arrange periodic spe- 
cial displays and promotions, and then 
follows them up with personal calls. 

3. WGAR, Cleveland, is in the 
works now with a new "Merchandis- 
ing" campaign which ties in such ma- 
jor supermarket chains as A&P and 
Kroger with guaranteed display pro- 
motions. Advertisers who sell their 
products through these two chains, and 
who qualify in other respects i includ- 
ing a minimum expenditure of $250 
per week net for 13 weeks on WGAR i 
are eligible for the point-of-purchase 
promotional backing. Special store 
displays will feature the air-advertised 
products, and special round-the-clock 
plugs on WGAR will call attention to 
the store displays. 

4. KNX, Los Angeles, is represen- 
tative of the big-power radio stations in 
mature TV markets which now realize 
that one of the best ways to counter TV 
losses is to make gains in the outlying 
areas where TV cant touch them, 
meanwhile merchandising to a fare- 
thee-well right under TV's nose. 

In conjunction with the station's 
popular, well-rated H ouseivives" Pro- 
tective League and Starlight Salute 
participation show, KNX employs a 
full-time merchandising manager with 
a thorough knowledge of sales and dis- 
tribution problems. Merchandising 
campaigns are thorough; they start 
lolling two weeks before the adver- 
tiser is due to bow onto the show, and 
they follow him from the early "flash" 
bulletins to dealers right through elab- 
orate composite and individual dis- 
plays, shelf promotions, window dis- 
plays, and tie-in retail advertising. 

KNX makes its tie-ups with drug, de- 
partment, and jewelry stores in addi- 
tion to the usual supermarkets and 
food stores. Typical result: the Marco 
Company of Los Angeles took a 13- 
week participation for their pet food 
on HPL and SS shows. Then, the mer- 
chandising began to roll. Ten days 
before their commercials started, the 
Marco Company had sold over one 
thousand cases of the product to retail- 
ers on the strength of the upcoming 
radio-plus-merchandising drive. 



Spot fundamentals 



Q. Does spot radio derive its name 
from the term "spot," meaning 
short announcement? 

A. 'I hi- i- a common misconception, 
even among executives of firms which 
have used spot radio for main years. 
Actually, the word spot used here 
means on the "spot"" the advertiser 
chooses. The form of advertising mes- 
sage may vary all the way from 
short station break announcements or 
other types of "spots" to participation 
in local programs or full sponsorship 



of news shows. < 1 1 is because of this 
• infusion that si'O.nsor avoids using 
the word "spot'" to mean air announce- 
ment. ' 

Q. What are the chief advantages 
of using spot radio? 

A. Apart from the fact that it brings 
sales results at low cost — as witness the 
results of the ARBI studies — spot radio 
is still the most flexible air medium, 
with the biggest "circulation." 

As NARTSR pointed out recently, 
"spot radio affords almost limitless op- 



more 



people are listening 

more 

to WQXR 

because there is no 
substitute for good music 



Ratings day and night have climbed for the 
past 2 Years — and are still climbing. 

While average Pulse ratings have increased, rates have not. 
And agencies, constantly on the look out for good, economi- 
cal buys, are recommending WQXR to clients who keep a 
sharp eye on budgets. They are finding WQXR's low cost- 
per-thousand most attractive and productive. 

WQXR's big 600,000-family market is in the market for 
your product. Let us show you how you can best reach these 
responsive ears... which cannot be reached so effectively 
by any other New York radio station. 

Call or write: W UAK 

229 West U3rd Street, Neiv York 36, New York 

LAckwanna U-1100. Represented by 

The Paul H. Raymer Company 



14 JULY 1952 



13 



portunit) to pin-point the audience 
you're trying to reach." 



Q. What does spot radio's "flexi- 
bility" mean to an advertiser? 

A. Spot radio gives an advertiser a 
wide-ranging choice of air vehicles to 
carry his advertising message. Basic- 
ally, this breaks into three categories: 
(1) programs. l2l announcements and 
participations, and (3) station breaks. 

An) of these three can be live or 
transcribed, or combinations of both. 
They can include everything from 
brief "station I.D." announcements 
and time signals through 20-second 
and 30-second station breaks, and on 
up to minute announcements, partici- 
pations, disk jockeys, local personali- 
ties, farm shows, newscasts, sports 
events, or transcribed full-length pro- 
grams. 

In terms of frequency, they can 
range from the simple, steady $40,000- 
annually campaigns of Oyster Shell 
Products (a single minute announce- 
ment per week on a list of farm sta- 
tions) through the gigantic saturation 
campaigns of General Mills for Wheat- 
ies 1 900 announcements per week for 



13 weeks, averaging 10 announcements 
per day per station). 

In terms of markets, spot radio's 
flexibilitv can range from a single "test 
market" campaign for a new product 
on up to the nationwide, all-major- 
market drives used b) the auto manu- 
facturers to announce a new model. 



Q. Who can be reached via spot 
radio? 

A. In the broad sense, every radio 
home in the nation, plus the outside- 
the-home listening done to auto sets 
and portables, and other forms of ra- 
dio listening, is part of the basic cov- 
erage of spot radio. 

In more precise terms, what applies 
to radio today in the way of statistics, 
listening and rating charts is true of 
spot radio. Reference to sponsor's 
Radio Basics section I see page 99 1 
will give advertisers and agencies a 
broad picture of spot radio, and who 
can be reached by it. 

However, getting the most out of 
spot radio is a matter of skilled time- 
buying by agencies. Individual think- 
ing must be applied to each market 
since everything from the climate and 



number of automobiles to seasonal 
business variations and local listening 
tastes can alter the picture. 

An advertiser entering spot radio 
for the first time must be prepared to 
face many small decisions — far more 
in sum than are involved in choosing 
a major network vehicle. He must be 
prepared also to allow his agency the 
maximum in freedom to make buys 
quickly. It takes fast stepping plans, 
hard work to reach spot radio's audi- 
ence with the right advertising vehicle 
at the right time. However, the audi- 
ence is there, and sales results more 
than make up for the extra effort. 



Spot programing 



Q. Are there any new trends or 
unusual advertising buys in station 
programing? 

A. Here are some of the major 
trends in local-level programing, as 
reported to SPONSOR by station reps 
and local program officials: 
1 . News programs — A year ago, spon- 
sor reported that "tke boom in news 
programing since the Korean war con- 



70 e T>a 76u 




AT KQV, it's a 24-hour-a-day job 
aggressively promoting in the right, 
places for its advertisers. Carefully 

planned promotion - - newspaper, dealer contests and special theater tie- 
ins - - is one reason why our rating and our local and national billing are 
consistently high. Spot revenue-wise, KQV is among the top five Mutual 
stations of the nation. 



Pittsburgh's Aggressive Radio Station 
5000W-1410KC 

Basic Mutual Network • Natl.Reps.,WEED&C0. 



74 



SPONSOR 



tinues unabated/' Today, that's still 
largely true, with the Korean situation 
dragging on, Europe jittery, and the 
national elections just around the cor- 
ner. Although TV newscasting has 
improved greatly in the past season, 
audiences still look to radio for fast- 
breaking news. 

But general rating levels of news- 
casting throughout the U.S., except 
for non-TV areas, are not higher than 
last year. There are. of course, some 
exceptions to this. Still, as Bob Hoff- 
man, research director of WOR, told 
SPONSOR: "The ratings of local radio 
newscasts are not striking when mea- 
sured against those of peak news peri- 
ods in 1951. However, radio newscasts 
are doing better relatively in TV areas 
than other types of radio programs. In 
other words, they're proving more dur- 
able. It's well to remember that there's 
9 trend toward listening to radio news- 
casts on secondary sets, particularly 
during the time when the early-eve- 
ning kid shows are on TV in video 
areas. Again, more newscast listening 
late at night is being done to secon- 
dar\ sets in bedrooms. These are not 
] effected accurately in today's ratings." 

/tations, realizing that one of their 
chief programing devices is news, are 
throwing a lot of effort into developing 
more news strips, and promoting those 
that already exist. In several recent 
instances, stations have turned down 
network sustainers and even commer- 
cial shows to build early-evening news- 
casts across-the-board. Sponsors for 
them are easy to find among both na- 
tional and local advertisers. The 
Presidential campaign is expected to 
do much to enhance news listening th 
fall and make for added sales of news. 

2. Participation shows — At both 
station and agency levels, an ever-in- 
creasing amount of attention is being 
paid to good participation shows. These 
run the gamut from morning disk 
jockeys to women's shows and late- 
night platter twirlers. 

Buying time in such programs has 
been made much easier, with more sta- 
tions servicing their reps with thorough 
research on ratings, costs-per-1.000. 
sales results and the like. As one of 
J. Walter Thompson's timebuyers put 
it to sponsor: 

"We used to play it safe, for the 
most part, in our spot campaigns, 
scheduling transcribed announcements 
and breaks next to local programs. 
Often, we did this to please clients who 

14 JULY 1952 



P 



ARE U0<L A MR. 



ft 



0fffy? 



SPOT RADIO? 

Spot radio lets you hand-pick the station which will 
do the best selling job for you — market-by-market. 

SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA? 

Southwest Virginia, of which Roanoke is the hub, 
is a complete market within itself. It represents 
about one-fourth of Virginia's total buying power. 

WDBJ? 

WDBJ is a 28-year-old pioneer in this rich market 
— a consistent leader year after year in listener 
loyalty, prestige, coverage, and sales results! Ask 
Free & Peters! 



Established 1924 • CBS Since 1929 
AM . 5000 WATTS . 960 KC 
FM . 41.000 WATTS • 94.9 MC 

ROANOKE, VA. 

Owned and Operated by the TIMES-WOULD CORPORATION 
FREE & PETERS, INC., National Representatives 



;■;.; . ■■:..: . ■ . ■'■':■:.■■.: 




CHEAP 
ELECTRIC POWER 

IS BRINGING 

NEW INDUSTRY 

TO 

WESTERN MONTANA 

76e Ait TKotfo Station* 



1 \ i 




ouuo wans izv wans 

Night 4 Day Night & Day 
MISSOULA ANACONDA 

BUTTE 



MONTANA 

THE TREASVRE STATE OF THE 48 



75 



had no respect for, or interest in. local 
programing. Now. with good morn- 
ing and afternoon announcement slots 
hard to find, clients have been forced 
to think in terms of local programs. 
Manv accounts I know who have tried 
participation programs are highl) 
pleased with the results. This in turn 
leads to more program business for 
stations especially among those that 
continue to develop good local shows." 
So popular has the local-personality 
type of participation show become that 
station reps todav have been looking 



increasingly for good program formu- 
lae which can be duplicated on all their 
stations and made into a kind of "pack- 
age."' One good example of this is the 
stretching of the Housewives' Protec- 
tive League to include all-but-two of 
the radio stations represented by CBS 
Radio Sales. As sponsor went to press, 
plans were in the works to extend HPL 
to those last two markets also, giving 
CBS complete uniformity. Advertisers 
can buy into any or all of these shows. 
In buying all of them they have a po- 
tential audience that's about the same 




HEREVER YOU 




All over Western 
New York, North- 
ern Pennsylvania 
and nearbyOntario, 
WGR is the MOST 
LISTENED-TO 
RADIO Station. 



iAjroadcoA&ng Corpj&ra&vit 



size as the total U.S. television homes. 

Network co-op shows have been 
turned, by many stations, into partici- 
pating programs to boost the amount 
of daytime slots they have to sell. 
More of this is expected for fall. 

3. Other program trends — With ra- 
dio growing increasingly competitive, 
stations have turned toward develop- 
ing more specialized program types. 
Sparked by such industrywide prime 
movers as the NARTSR spot radio 
clinics, the BMI broadcaster clinics, 
and national and regional meetings of 
broadcaster groups, stations are now 
going after "special interest"' audiences 
with programs designed for their ears. 

Music shows are seldom mixtures of 
different musical types. They now range 
from stepped-up rural and folk music 
shows aimed at farm audiences to 
specialty shows like WNBC's all-night 
classical record -low. There are shows 
for language groups, hobbyists, motor- 
ists, gardeners, farmers, and vacation- 
ists in ever-growing numbers. Pro- 
grams of a purely public-service na- 
ture, and those of special communis 
interest (local news, club doings, etc. i 
are on the increase. 

"The theory behind this is simple,'" 
a station manager told sponsor. "We 
pick up some more audiences here, and 
we pick up some more there. In sum. 
they add up to a substantial boost to 
our basic listening audiences, and help 
to integrate the station into the busi- 
ness and social life of the community." 



Transcriptions 



RAND BUILDING, BUFFALO 3, N. Y. 

Notional Representatives: Free & Peters, Inc. 



leo J. ("Fitz") Fitzpatrick 
I. R. ("Ike") lounsberry 



Q Are advertisers increasing their 
use of transcribed shows? 

A. The transcribed radio program 
business is enjoying a boom. It is now 
the chief developer of new big-time 
radio shows and other attractions de- 
signed to keep station programing on 
a high professional level — and afford 
advertisers a low-cost means of pro- 
graming. 

The Frederic W. Ziv Company, in- 
dustry leader, states that their 1952 
production budget is triple what it 
was a few years ago; for the next sev- 
eral years, they have a very elaborate 
production schedule. In the 1951-52 
season, Ziv invested $2,548,000 in 
three new program series: / Was a 
Communist for the FBI, $650,000 



76 



SPONSOR 



($12,500 per program, 52 in series); 
Bright Star, $650,000 (ditto); Bold 
Venture, $1,248,000 ($12,000 per pro- 
gram, 104 in series). 

RCA Recorded Program Services 
has appreciably upped its production 
budget to meet increased demand for 
syndicated shows. They report that 
the number of advertisers using their 
shows has increased 25% since last 
year, with regional sponsors predomi- 
nating among the new ones. The 300 
stations currently carrying their pro- 
grams represent a 40 f i increase in sta- 
tions over last year. 

Harry S. Goodman reports that the 
number of advertisers using his shows 
increased about 40% since last year, 
while dollar volume has gone up 25' < . 
Show sales were adversely affected in 
some 15 major markets (due to TV) 
but Goodman turned his concentration 
on the smaller markets; now he has a 
larger number of advertisers who pay 
less money each but it all adds up to 
expanded dollar volume for Goodman. 
Although Goodman is not now pro- 
ducing any new radio shows (he's 
concentrating on new TV produc- 
tions), he looks forward to continued 
high sales of the 29 programs already 
"in stock/' 

Charles Michelson. Inc. indicates 
gross income is up 25 to 30% since 
last year, while the number of adver- 
tisers using their shows multiplied by 
some 60 to 70 ( /< . They have upped 
their production budget over 100% 
since last year, have put out about six 
new programs. The number of sta- 
tions carrying their programs (450 to 
500) has increased by about 100 since 
last summer. They report an increas- 
ing use of their shows on the larger 
stations and on the smallest ones, with 
the medium-sized outlets lagging. Rea- 
sons: Net affiliates are hungry for pro- 
grams to make their time remunerative. 
The small-station spurt Michelson at- 
tributes to the break-up of the Liberty- 
Network. 

MGM Radio Attractions has become 
more of a producer than a syndicator 
over the past year. As of 31 December 
1951, the firm signed a long-term con- 
tract with the Mutual Broadcasting 
System entitling Mutual to the use of 
the 10 leading MGM shows on a more 
or less exclusive basis in the U.S. With 
these programs, which are all top-star 
shows, Mutual has been programing 
six evening hours weekly over its en- 
tire network of over 550 stations (Mon- 



MIDDLE 
TENNESSEE'S 
RADIO VOICE 




100% NEGRO PROGRAMMING! 
100% NEGRO PERSONALITIES! 

MR. ADVERTISER: Would you be satisfied if you knew 
one of your salesmen was only making a 70% effort to- 
ward completing a sale? If you're overlooking the NEGRO 
segment of the city of Nashville's population, you're 
neglecting 30% of your prospects! 

The only sure way of making a 100% sales effort in 
Nashville is through the use of NEGRO RADIO 1 

NEGRO RADIO in Middle Tennessee is WSOK' 

WSOK is the station that began broadcasting December 
14, 1951 and ranks THIRD*, month-by-month in the 
C. E. Hooper total rated share of audience time periods, 
January through April, 1952. 

When you compare rates and Hooperatings with the other 
leading Nashville stations, you'll be convinced that WSOK 
is your best radio buy in Middle Tennessee. 

Over 110,000 NEGROES live and buy in the WSOK 0.1 
MV listening area. 

Forjoe men have fact sheets on this top station and 
market! 

I ml trtti i if< ii large segment o) Whitt listeners *//*<». 



1000 
WATTS 



1470 
KC 



REPS 



FKffl 



NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 

FORJOE & CO. . . . DORA-CLAYTON (Southeast) 



14 JULY 1952 



77 



day through Saturday evenings, from 
8:00 to 9:00 p.m. each night I. MGM 
Radio Attractions also has a similar 
tie-up with a Canadian group of sta- 
tions, All-Canada Radio Facilities. 
which uses most of the same shows as 
Mutual. 

Incidentally a frequent plaint heard 
at BAB and BMI district meetings is 
that there is a shortage of half-hour 
programs. Some of the complaining 
station men say they've pretty well ex- 
hausted the availahle material of this 
type and are looking forward to a 
hroader output of the 30-minute tran- 
si i iptions from among the syndicators. 



Q. What advertisers are using 
transcribed programs? 

A. Transcription firms almost unani- 
mously report notable increases this 
past year in the number of advertisers 
buying their shows (see figures in 
Question 1 ) . Ziv notes that multi-mar- 
ket transcription buys by regional and 
national advertisers of its big-time 
vehicles have been increasing. / Was 
A Communist for the FBI, which has 
been sold on over 550 stations, was 
purchased for 50 stations by the Jacob 
Schmidt Brewing Co. of St. Paul; in 
10 markets by the Golden State Dairy 
Company of San Francisco; in six by 




You can't cover Indiana's #2 
market from another state. 

Our rates are local and include 
complete merchandising distri- 
bution and promotion assistance. 

We serve 400,000 loyal listen- 
ers in Negro, rural, industrial, 
and four nationality groups. 

Only the Gary Sales Plan sells 
Indiana's second market. 

Call us without obligation. 

Gen. Mgr.-WWCA 



WWCA 

Gary Indiana's 
No. 2 Market 



Chicago's 

Radio 

Monster 



the Timken Roller Bearing Company. 
Greyhound Bus Company, Bigelow- 
Chevrolet, are among other sponsors 
of / Was A Communist and other Ziv 
shows. Brewers, utilities, grocery and 
food sponsors are leading Ziv program 
purchasers. 

Regional advertisers predominated 
among those buying RCA syndicated 
programs this past year, and RCA 
looks forward to welcoming even more 
regional as well as national sponsors. 
Among those already on the RCA list 
are McCormick Biscuits, Ltd.. Borden. 
General Electric. Frigidaire, Mail 
Pouch Tobacco, Procter & Gamble. 

Charles Antell sponsored five of the 
MGM Radio Attractions over the whole 
Mutual network in a nine-week cam- 
paign just ended. These programs 
{ Woman of the Year, The Black Mu- 
seum, MGM Musical Comedy of the 
Air, Adventures of Casanova, Adven- 
tures of Maisie) are currently taking 
a 13-week hiatus from the air; the 
other five MGM features (Crime Does 
Not Pay, Story of Dr. Kildare, The 
Hardy Family, Gracie Fields Show, 
MGM Theatre of the Air) will remain 
on Mutual throughout the summer. 
They are sponsored on a co-op basis 
by some 650 advertisers. Pequot 
Mills and Amana Refrigerators spon- 
sor another MGM show on Mutual, 
The Paula Stone Show. 

National advertisers bankrolling 
Goodman programs, most of them on 
a co-op basis, include General Electric. 
Philco, Admiral, Nash Kelvinator. 
Kroger Grocery Company. Sponsors 
using Charles Michelson offerings are 
largely local but include some national 
spot buyers. In the ranks are Wrig- 
ley's, General Motors, Blackstone Wash- 
ing Machines, Borden, Lever Bros., 
General Foods (for Post Toasties and 
Instant Postum). Jackson Brewing 
Company (Midwest and South), Early 
& Daniel Feed Company. 



Q. What types of transcribed 
shows are most popular? 

A. Mysteries, soap operas, and big- 
name, network calibre shows seem to 
be in the lead. Ziv's / Was a Commu- 
nist for the FBI, starring Dana An- 
drews, is carried on over 550 stations; 
Bold Venture on over 500: their Bright 
Star comedy series starring Irene 
Dunne and Fred MacMurray which 
debuted 24 September 1951. signed 
227 markets in its first M) days, is now 



78 



SPONSOR 



on over 400 stations; Boston Blackie's 
19.1 rating in Kansas City made it 
the highest-rated show in the city on 
Sunday afternoons. Ziv offers 26 pro- 
gram series, ranging from the musical 
Guy Lombardo Show to western Cisco 
Kid to soap operas Dearest Mother and 
Forbidden Diary to sleuth stanzas 
Philo Vance and Boston Blackie. 

Soap operas head the Goodman 
popularity list, namely, Linda s First 
Love and Mary Foster, Editor's Daugh- 
ter, (sponsored by Kroger Compan) I. 
Burl Ives Sings and Hymns of the 
World come next, then the mystery 
show Let George Do It, previously a 
top-rated show on the Don Lee Net- 
work which Goodman "took off the 
line" and sold in other sections of the 
country. Public service feature. Doc- 
tor's Orders, has also been selling well. 

RCA Recorded Program Services of- 
fers 24 syndicated programs, found 
that the most popular this year were 
Aunt Mary, The Haunting Hour, 
Weird Circle, Five Minute Mysteries, 
The Playhouse of Favorites, and A 
House in the Country. 

Widest sponsorship in the Michelson 
stable goes to mysteries, with The 



Sealed Book and The Avenger on tup. 
WTOP, Washington, D. C. uses a solid 
Michelson mystery block from 8:00 to 
11:00 p.m. Fridays, has topped all 
other Washington stations rating-wise. 
Michelson has added two new mys- 
teries this year, In the Name of the 
Law, and Order in the Court; will soon 
release Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde series. 



Q. What do transcribed programs 
cost? 

A. Costs still vary, depending on sta- 
tion and size of market. But general- 
ly, an advertiser can buy a transcribed 
show for even less than last year in 
many markets, due to TV competition. 
RCA syndicated programs, which 
last year ranged from $4.00 to over 
$200.00 a program, can be bought this 
year for from $3.00 to $150.00 per 
show. Goodman shows also start at 
$3.00 in the smallest markets, run up 
to $250.00 in major centers — a reduc- 
tion from last year's top rate of $400. 



What is the fall outlook for 



transcribed programs? 

A. V er\ ros\ . Zi\ l!< \ Goodman. 
Michelson all anticipate steadily rising 
sales, continuing the jiains of L952. 

Zi\ predicts their business will ex- 
pand in direct ratio to the speed with 
which the network radio business de 
(lines. With their lavish production 
budget they plan to produce shows 
with even more top stars, and the best 
script material available. 

According to A. B. Sambrook, man- 
ager of RCA Recorded Program Sei 
vices Sales: "The fall outlook is a 
bright one, with every indication of 
increased sale> In stations and spon- 
sors. The trend will be toward greater 
use of these shows by well-known re- 
gional and national sponsors." 

Goodman looks forward to a revival 
of sales in the major markets this fall 
as the networks have fewer top pro- 
grams to feed their affiliates. 

Michelson says his upped business 
this past year was not due to any spe- 
cial promotion or selling effort on his 
part, but to the growing recognition 
by stations that they need transcribed 
shows to remain in a competitive posi- 
tion programing-wise. 



_~_rL._ 


1950 DATA 


Within 0.5 

MV/M 

Contour, DAY 


Within 0.1 

MV/M 

Contour, DAY 


AUDIENCE, 1950 






lAffKfl ALTOONA 


Population 


149,800 


239,400 


lnr Vm penna 


In Communities 
On Farms 


138,900 
10,900 


201,220 
38,180 


^^ 


Households 


44,300 


68,500 




In Communities 


41,760 


59,780 




On Farms 


2,540 


8,720 


Your message on WFBG reaches a potential listening 


Radio Homes 


41,950 


64,100 


audience of over a quarter million people . . . people 


In Communities 
On Farms 


39,630 
2,320 


56,090 
8,010 


eager to purchase your merchandise when presented 


RETAIL MARKET, 1949, $ 






over "The Station Most People Listen to Most" in 


Food Stores 


36,600,000 


49,180,000 


Altoona. 


General Merchandise Stores 


15,130,000 


19,700,000 




Apparel Stores 


8,850,000 


10,670,000 




Home Furnishings Stores 


8,870,000 


11,120,000 


OF THE PEOPLE 


Automotive Outlets 


17,500,000 


27,240,000 


OQ Q* LISTEN TO WFBG Eft ft* OF THE TIME 
ImOuO (6:00 AM till 1:00 AM) UU.U 


Filling Stations 
Building Mtl. -Hardware 


5,240,000 
6,700,000 


10,250,000 
10,530,000 


Eating-Drinking Places 


8,320,000 


12,810,000 




Drug Stores 


2,280,000 


2,840,000 




All Other Stores 


10,180,000 


14,870,000 


Due to fine programming and outstanding public 


TOTAL RETAIL SALES 


1 19,670,000 


169,210,000 


service, WFBG has dominated the rich Altoona mar- 


FARM MARKET, 1949 






ket for the past 26 years. 


Number of Farms 
Automotive Vehicles 


2,250 
4,150 


7,710 
14,340 




Cost of Feed Purchased $ 


1,630,000 


6,520,000 


JACK SNYDER, MANAGING DIRECTOR 


Value of Products $ 


6,670,000 


24,400,000 


Sources: Census of 1950 iPopulatio 


n) 1949 (Business) 1945 lAgri- 




culture*: BMB Radio Families', SRC 


)S Consumer Markets; coordina- 


nil NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 

"Con 


tion to 1949-1950 on basis of Fe 


deral estimates by WALTER P. 


BURN, Middlcbury, Vermont 




an Met. Altoona Area Survey, January 


1951. All Stations participating. 



14 JULY 1952 



79 



Library services 

Q. Are advertisers and stations 
buying more library service pro- 
grams? 

A. Decidedl) yes. Despite the flood 
of free records supplied to stations by 
phonograph manufacturers in return 
for free plugs, the library service busi- 
ness is doing better than ever. This 
may be due in part to the intensified 
promotion and selling efforts made by 
most of the services, and in part to the 
continued opportunity libraries offer 
sponsors and stations to present 
smooth, professionally scripted pro- 
grams at very low cost. 

There are nine leading library com- 
panies: Associated Program Service, 
New York; Capitol Records, Holly- 
wood; M. M. Cole, Chicago; Lang- 
Worth Feature Programs, New York; 
C. P. MacGregor, Los Angeles; RCA 
Recorded Program Services (Thesau- 
rus Shows), New York; Sesac, New 
York; Standard Radio Transcription 
Services, Hollywood; World Broad- 
casting System, New York. 

Business at the World Broadcasting 
System, according to general manager 
Robert Friedheim, is breaking all pre- 



\ ious records. The number of advertis- 
ers using their shows increased 30 to 
IV , since last year, largely on the lo- 
cal level. World now has more than 
900 radio station-subscribers, a 15% 
increase over last year. In April 1952 
alone WBS signed 42 new contracts 
with stations. This was the biggest 
month in their history. They've upped 
their production budget by some 25%. 

Associated Program Service, says its 
vice president and general manager 
Maurice B. Mitchell, is serving more 
stations now than ever before. He at- 
tributes this partly to their new policy 
of offering stations specialized libraries 
— such as a production music library, 
a show medley library, a popular li- 
brary — at considerably lower rates 
than the full APS library. This, states 
Mitchell, has had the effect of opening 
many hitherto closed doors. Many sta- 
tions using competitive libraries have 
bought these specialized units to aug- 
ment weak sections: others which nev- 
er before used a library are also select- 
ing only the units they need. As for 
the production budget, barometer of 
future hopes, APS has always been a 
large one, says Mitchell, and they have 
no plans to reduce it. 

According to Bennett S. Rosner, ad- 








ANTED 



"EARLY WORM" JOHNSON 



The "Early Worm" never gets the bird from sponsors who want 
results. Irwin Johnson's "Early Worm" program has top listenership 
throughout the 24-county, Central Ohio area reached by WBNS . . . 
starts the day right for loyal WBNS listeners. They stay with WBNS 
to hear top local and CBS network shows . . . including all the top 
20-rated programs! 

K JOHN BLAIR 

POWM 
WINS — 5,000 
WCLD-FM — S 3.000 
(OLUMIUS. OHIO 

OUTLET 





vertising manager, sponsorship of 
RCA s Thesaurus library service shows 
and commercial features has increased 
by over l,000 f f since last year (based 
on reports from their subscriber sta- 
tions I . Regional advertisers comprise 
most of the newcomers. RCA has great- 
ly increased its Thesaurus production 
budget, in line with the continuing bus- 
iness climb. 

Sesac reports an increase of about 
20% since last year in the number of 
stations they service, which now total 
approximately 500. They are also 
aware of an appreciable increase in 
sponsors, largely local, and have upped 
production allocation some 25%. 



Q. What do library services offer 
to sponsors? 

A. The primary offerings of libraries 
are still musical programs, many of 
them expertly built and scripted and 
featuring well-known talent on high- 
fidelity recordings. These musical 
shows run the gamut from pop to con- 
cert, from Western to religious, from 
Broadway show tunes to Dixieland 
jazz. Most services have 4,000 to 5,000 
selections in their basic libraries, script 
between 15 and 30 program series. 
These programs offer sponsors shows 
of network calibre combined with the 
grass-roots appeal of local announcing. 

Associated offers 14 programs with 
such stars as Vic Damone and Mindy 
Carson representative of the calibre 
of talent to be found in The Stars 
Sing, Music for America, Candlelight 
and Silver, and Curtain Calls. Associ- 
ated also has a collection of 179 differ- 
ent commercial jingles — including lead- 
ins for a wide variety of sponsors, 
weather, time, shopping-days-till- 
Christmas jingles. (A recent AFRA 
arbitration decision took jingles out of 
the library category, ruling that they 
are now to be considered open-end ma- 
terial requiring repayment to perform- 
ers every 13 weeks. New jingles would 
come under this provision. Unless this 
situation is subsequently changed by 
negotiations this fall, it would economi- 
cally block the production of new jin- 
gles by libraries.) 

Of the over 25 programs World 
Broadcasting offers, the most popular 
sponsorwise have been long-standing 
Horn em a ker Harmonies, Dick Haymes 
and Forward America. Newcomer 
Chapel by the Side of the Road fea- 
tures Raymond Massey, with Bible 
readings and devotional music, has sur- 



8C 



SPONSOR 



prised World by the interest it has 
stirred in metropolitan centers such as 
Rochester (WHAM) and St. Louis 
(KSD). The People Choose, a narra- 
tive with musical interludes, is a politi- 
cal series designed for this election 
year. World programs feature such 
stars as Robert Montgomery, Mimi 
Benzell, David Rose, Lanny Ross. Kit- 
ty Kallen. World prides itself on its 
varied programing fare, as well as its 
wide range of supplementary material 
and special occasion jingles. They 
have recently introduced a series of 
"sell sounds" — sound effects designed 
to give greater impact to commercials. 
The most heavily sponsored of the 
30 RCA Thesaurus shows this year 
were The Freddy Martin Show, Date in 
Hollywood, The Hour of Charm, The 
Wayne King Serenade, Music by Roth, 
and The Tex Beneke Show. Recently 
added programs include Sons of the 
Pioneers, A Christmas Carol, and The 
Story of the Nativity. In addition The- 
saurus offers recorded introductions of 
talent, announcements, program signa- 
tures, sound effects, and mood music. 
Lang-Worth musical programs are 
liberally peppered with such stars as 
Allan Jones, Vaughn Monroe, Frankie 
Carle. Patti Page, Alan Dale, Juanita 
Hall, Tito Guizar, Tony Pastor, Count 
Basic Shows range from the "Musi- 
cal Western" Riders of the Purple 
Sage to the symphonic Concert Hour. 
Sesac offers 15 programs ranging 
from Mr. Muggins Rabbit, a kid show 
with incidental music, to the religious 
Little White Chapel, the patriotic Here 
Comes the Band, and the light concert 
Music We Remember. 

Standard Radio Transcriptions has 
Hollywood Calling, pop concert with 
interviews, Musical Roundup, Western 
variety, and Sports Parade, sports sto- 
ry with music, among others. 

Capitol Records offers such names as 
Jan Garber, Skitch Henderson, Frank 
deVol. and King Cole in their pop and 
dance programs. Andy Parker pro- 
vides the Western touch and Pee Wee 
Hunt caters to Dixieland jazz tastes in 
The Man From Dixie. 

C. P. MacGregor, in addition to such 
shows as Melodies that Endure, Say It 
With Music, and Americana, sends out 
Holiday Scripts, special scripts with 
music for holidays. 



Q. What sponsors are buying li- 
brary service programs? 

A. sponsor noted in a music libraries 




To the radio advertiser 

who inquired about an 
under-the-counter deal 



One of our boys recently put aside his rustic 
clothes and haystrewn speech for a look at the 
World. "Madison Avenue is a shambles," he 
reported. "All advertisers are equal only some 
are more equal than others. Rate cards gyrate. 
Counters for dealing under are everywhere. One 
fellow even made me a Proposition!" 

We calmed him down with a month's vacation 
and decided to make a Statement, to wit: 

1. Our rate card No. 18 became effective 
June 1, 1951. 

2. If rate increases become necessary a new 
rate card will be issued (with a year of grace 
between announcement and effective date). 

3. If rate decreases go into effect a new rate 
card will be issued; everyone will know about 

it and benefit from the reduction. 

We're old fashioned- about rate cards. Ours mean 
what they say. Everyone is treated the same as 
anyone. This saves time-buyers embarrassment: 
they know where they stand; they don't have 
to be worried about bargaining. 

We submit that WMT's published rates offer a 
fertile source of advertising value: 338,480 
families who listen each week to WMT's exclusive 
regional and CBS programming. The Katz 
Agency, our national representative, says amen. 



5000 WATTS, 600 KC 
REPRESENTED NATIONALLY 
BY THE KATZ AGENCY 

BASIC CBS RADIO NETWORK 




14 JULY 1952 



81 




Top Hooper, top coverage., top merchandising 
support means WRBL leads ALL media in de- 
livering the booming Columbus market. In 
1951 Columbus showed a 10% POPULATION 
INCREASE: 10.5% RETAIL SALES INCREASE; 
16.5% INCREASE in Effective Buying Income. 
WRBL delivers 18.7% MORE COVERAGE than 
all other media in the Columbus 26 county 
trading area. For complete coverage at the 
lowest cost per thousand contact WRBL or 
Hollingbery. 




article I 15 January 1951 1 that library 
shows boast a long roster of local 
sponsors, but national and regional ad- 
vertisers have not accorded them much 
attention. That there has been some- 
what of a change in this trend is indi- 
cated by RCA Thesaurus and its report 
that of the vast increase 1 1,000% ) in 
sponsorship of its shows since last 
year, the largest factor was regional 
sponsorship. 

Among Thesaurus show sponsors are 
Pepsi-Cola Bottling Company. Arthur 
Murray School of Dancing. Beltone 
Hearing Aid Company. Dodge-Pl\- 
mouth Dealers, Ford Motors. Cities 
Service, Oldsmobile, Borden. General 
Electric. Pure Oil. Zenith. Myndall 
Cain Cosmetics, Motorola. Chrysler- 
Plymouth Dealers. 

National and regional advertisers 
using World shows include: National 
Biscuit Company. Sinclair Oil, Cities 
Service, Sherwin Williams Paints. In- 
ternational Harvester. Borden. Shell 
Gas and Oil, Texaco Company. Sears, 
Roebuck, Lipton. W. & J. Sloan Fur- 
niture. 

APS programs boast a long list of 
local sponsors, still earn Westinghouse 
Dealers, Household Finance Corp.. and 
Thyovals (vitamins). 

Q. What do library shows cost? 

A. Similar to transcribed programs, 
costs vary according to the market. 
APS reveals that an entire show can 
be bought for $2.00 — just the price of 
one of the transcriptions — on some sta- 
tions, but would cost considerably 
more on the major market power- 
houses. World programs sell to spon- 
sors for from $5.00 to $100.00 per 
show — and higher. What it all adds up 
to is that library shows are still a very 
low-cost — yet high-calibre — type of 
programing which stations are putting 
<m the air for advertisers. 



Regional networks 

Q. What factors are causing the 
growth of regional networks? 

A. There's nothing strikingly new 
about the use of regional networks by 
spot air advertisers, a common enough 
practice since the early 1930's. But. in 
the past year or so. regional radio webs 
have emerged as a sharply-defined con- 
tender for the $135.000.000-plus spent 
annually in spot radio broadcasting. 



82 



SPONSOR 



This growth of a medium- within-a-me- 
flium has been due to I a I the increas- 
ing amount of promotion, campaign- 
ing, programing, and advertising 
know-how being exhibited by regional 
webs, and (b) the flexibilit) of region- 
al webs. 

Regional networks meet a variet) ol 
advertising needs. For the national 
advertiser who wants to break awav 
from a network pattern and hit hard 
in a certain area, or for the regional 
advertiser who has a distribution pat- 
tern peculiarly his own. the regional 
network may be the answer. Regional 
nets are valuable as well for advertisers 
who want to supplement inadequate TV 
coverage. An important benefit is the 
fact that the agency's paperwork and 




Angling for 
New Markets? 



If you're fishing for new mar- 
kets, past result stories point 
to KFYR as a likely spot. The 
station with the nation's larg- 
est area coverage, KFYR 
doesn't depend on "fish stor- 
ies" — offers the national ad- 
vertiser hard-hitting facts which 
bear out KFYR's coverage and 
selling claims in this rich, rural 
market. 




5000 WATTS-N.B.C. AFFILIATE 
Rep. by John Blair 



timebuying procedure i> simplified. 

One contract, one clearance, and one 
billing take the place of individual 
dealings with three to 10 stations. 

For instance, llie Tobacco Network 
of Raleigh, Y ('.. comprises six sta- 
tions and covers eastern North Caro- 
lina, the states major market. The net- 
work oilers sales, sales promotion, and 
merchandising all from its executive 
offices in Raleigh. 

\n advertiser with marketing distri- 
bution in three states such as Wash- 
ington, Oregon, and California, might 
be interested in the Columbia Pacific 
or Don Fee networks. Columbia Pa- 
cific covers an area that runs from the 
Canadian to the Mexican border. The 
Don Fee chain, with !~> stations is a 
"package" designed to cover the Pa- 
cific ("oast with a single advertising 
order. Don \jc and CBS Pacific are 
flexible in that advertisers do not have 
to take the whole network. A new ad- 
vertiser can start by buying coverage 
only of the areas in which he has (or 
wishes to establish I product distribu- 
tion. As his distribution grows, he can 
add stations market by market. 



Q. What brought regional nets 
into being? 

A. Advertiser need for focused sell- 
ing is the major reason for the forma- 
tion of regional nets. But in some in- 
stances, the popularity of certain re- 
gional programs led to formation of 
networks. 

Such was the historj of the Texas 
Quality Network which came into be- 
ing in the spring of 1934. It was 
formed basically to carrj Southwest 
football games and one of its first ac- 
counts was Burrus Mill & Elevator 
Company, which is still on the air. 

One of the newer regional nets 
founded primarih because of audience 
interest in specialized programs is the 
Wyoming Cowboy. It began opera- 
tions in February 1052 and was the 
outgrowth of statewide interest in Uni- 
versity of \\\oniing sports activities. 
The net serves three-fourths of Wyo- 
ming's population of 285,000. 



Q. Who are some regional net 
advertisers? 

A. Proof of regional network success 
are the host and variety of advertisers 
to be found on them. They include such 
accounts as Conoco, Anacin, Bulova, 




TWO TOP 

CBS RADIO STATIONS 

TWO BIG 

SOUTHWEST MARKETS 

ONE LOW 

COMBINATION RATE 



Sales -winning radio 
schedules for the Great 
Southwest just naturally 
include this pair of top- 
producing CBS Radio 
Stations. Results prove 
this! Write, wire or phone 
our representatives now 
for availabilities and 
rates! 

National Representatives 



JOHN BLAIR & CO. 



14 JULY 1952 



83 



IN 

THE 

MIDDLE 

OF 

THE 

WORLDS 

LARGEST 

TOBACCO 

MARKET 




WGTM 



5000 WATTS • CBS AFF. 



WILSON 



NORTH CAROLINA 



SELLS 'EM! 



1,275,800 PEOPLE' 
whose 1951 EBI was 
$1,155,020,000.00* 
who "wentto market" 
to the tune of 
$806,083,000.00 in 
1951* 



5,000 Watts Full Time 
590 Kilocycles 

Allen Wanamaker, General Manager 

• Wilson, N. C. * 

The Walker Representation Co., New York Citv 

SM SURVEY OF BUYING POWER, May 10, '52 

— 29 Counties Covered by WGTM 



Camels. Studebaker. Surf, Western Air 
Lines, Mogen David Wine, Pan Amer- 
ican Coffee Bureau, Sunshine Biscuit 
Company, and many other national 
and regional accounts. 

Q. How large an area do regional 
networks cover? 

A. Regionals scale down from West 
Coast-encompassing Don Lee and CBS 
Pacific to the more typical Z-Net (Pa- 
cific Northwest Broadcasters) which 
covers the important cities of western 
Montana. Generally, local conditions 
shape the coverage area of a regional. 
Sometimes the effort of half a dozen 
medium coverage stations to compete 
with a powerhouse in the area causes 
them to hand together in a natural al- 
liance. In other cases common owner- 
ship may be the binding factor. 

The regional networks are by no 
means confined to one-state coverage. 
The Intermountain Network, for ex- 
ample, is composed of seven stations 
in LItah. four in Idaho, seven in Wyo- 
ming, nine in Montana, one in Ne- 
vada, six in Colorado, nine in New 
Mexico, and one in Texas. Second to 
Don Lee in number of stations, it prob- 
ably covers the largest area of any in 
the country. Its territory has a popu- 
lation of 3.935,992 with 1.172.123 ra- 
dio homes and retail sales of $4,169.- 
470,000. 

Q. How many regional networks 
are there? 

A. There are approximately 70 as of 
the spring of 1952 with new nets form- 
ing recently at the rate of one every 
few months. An upcoming issue of 
sponsor will contain an article detail- 
ing the value of regionals to sponsors 
and including a list of all regional net- 
works and their reps. A representative 
handful of regionals includes the West- 
ern Slope Network in western Colo- 
rado, the Oklahoma Network, Granite 
State Network, and the Wisconsin Net- 
work. 

Q How do citywide networks 
operate? 

A. Strictly speaking, these are not re- 
gionals. The Metropolitan Network of 
Washington, D. C. for example, covers 
the metropolitan area of Washington 
only. But it has the same ease-of-pur- 
chase advantages as networks covering 
much larger regions. Its stations are 
suburban based and designed to reach 



an increased suburban audience 
brought about by the population shift 
to the suburbs and the preponderance 
of new construction in the suburban 
area. The net is composed of WARL- 
AM-FM. Arlington. Va.: WUST-AM- 
FM. Bethesda-Chevv Chase. Md.: 
WFAX. Falls Church. Va.; WGAY. 
Silver Spring. Md.: WPIK. Alex- 
andria. Va. 

Each of the stations is owned, man- 
aged, and programed completely inde- 
pendent of the others. Basic format is 
block programing of music and news, 
the principle differences among them 
being the emphasis on sports and types 
of music: hillbilly, popular, sweet, con- 
cert. Negro. Advertiser-advantages: 
the five stations may be purchased as 
a unit for either announcements or pro- 
grams. Spot announcements may be 
bought at the same time on each sta- 
tion or staggered. Big advantage of 
buying the same time on each station 
is that youre assured of an undupli- 
cated audience. Sponsors on the sta- 
tions include Bayer aspirin, Motorola. 




J BOB 
__JSS»*' » ^^■■' TREBOR 




IN ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



Represented Nationally by 
THE BOLLING COMPANY 



84 



SPONSOR 



Pertussin, Adam Hats. 

Joe Brechner, of WGAY and chair- 
man of the five-station group, com- 
ments on why advertisers are turning 
to this type of radio operation. "It has 
been our observation that as TV in- 
creases its impact that the national ad- 
vertiser is going to turn more and more 
to the methods and media which have 
been producing results day in and day 
out for retail advertisers where dollars 
spent for advertising have to ring the 
cash register the next day. Phis logi- 
cally leads to the use of the Metropoli- 
tan Network group for convenience of 
purchase by the national advertiser at 
regional rates in proven independent 
radio stations." 



Foreign-language radio 



Q. How big is the foreign-lan- 
guage market? 

A. Nobody's sure. The 1950 census 
showed 10,147,000 foreign-born whites 
in the U. S. at the time. Per capita in- 
come then was $1,436. Thus the mar- 
ket restricted to foreign-born alone 
could be estimated conservatively at 
more than $14 billion, assuming this 
group saved no more than the rest of 
us. Add the children and grandchil- 
dren, and the sky's the limit in esti- 
mating potentials. 



Q. How can a sponsor reach these 
10 million listeners most cheaply? 

A. Over 384 stations program in 30 
languages, according to an NARTB 
survey made in 1950. Situation has 
not changed much since then, a spot 
check by sponsor showed. The lan- 
guages range from Albanian to Yugo- 
slav and include Arabic. Chinese, Dan- 
ish, Gaelic, Japanese, and Slovenian. 
Top 10 and the number of stations 
carrying follow: 



Language 


No. Stations 


Language No 


Station* 


Spanish 


165* 


Czech 

Greek . . 

Yiddish 

Portuguese 
& German _ 


35 


Italian _ 
Polish 


. 124 
100 


33 
32 


French 


. _ 41 








28 



•sponsor estimate 1952: 189. 



Q. Where are these foreign-lan- 
guage markets concentrated? 

A. Mostly metropolitan centers such 
as New York, Philadelphia, Boston, 
Chicago, Detroit, Buffalo, Cleveland, 



Pittsburgh, New Orleans, Los Angeles, 
San Francisco. Exceptions: Midwest 
farm communities, Spanish Southwest. 
Biggest single market is New York 
with 2.5 million Jews, 2 million Ital- 
ians, 750,000 Germans, 412,000 Poles 
350,000 Puerto Ricans, 123,000 Hun- 
garians. 57,000 Czechs, 54,000 Nor- 
wegians, 53,000 Greeks and main oth- 
ers — 75 nationalities in all. 



Q. How can the sponsor cash in 
most effectively on the New York 
foreign-language market? 



A. Over these six specialized stations 
I all of which repoi ted business as good 
as or better than last year) : 

I. WI1W German. Spanish, Ital- 
ian daily plus French, Hungarian, 
Greek, Polish; 2. WEVD— Yiddish; 
3. WHOM— Italian, Spanish, Polish. 
German, Yiddish (plus Chinese, Turk- 
ish, Swiss-German and Ikrainian on 
WHOM-FM); 4. WLIB— Polish, Yid- 
dish (plus Chinese, Turkish, Swiss- 
German and Ukrainian on WHOM- 
FM) ; 5. WO V— Italian (some French); 
6. WWRL — Arabic, Czech, French, 
German, Greek, Hungarian, Lithuani- 




THIS RICH MARKET 



Radio delivers MORE sets-in-use in the South 
Bend market than before TV! . . . Hooper Ser- 
veys for Oct.-Nov. 1951 compared with Oct.- 
Nov. 1945 prove it. Morning up 6.8, afternoon 
up 8.0 and evening up 4.4. Television is still 
insignificant here because no consistently sat- 
isfactory TV signal reaches South Bend. Don't 
sell this rich market short. Wrap it up with 
WSBT radio. 



30 Years on the Air 



x 




% 



*« 



5000 WATTS • 960 KC • CBS 



^ 



PAUL H. R A Y M E R COMPANY • NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



14 JULY 1952 



85 



11th IN EFFECTIVE 

BUYING INCOME 

PER CAPITA 

among Sales Management's 
162 Metropolitan Areas 

• 

Distributors and merchant's 
here are pleased that the Quad- 
City area has moved 3 steps 
ahead to 11th place in the 
effective buying income cate 
gory. This great depth of 
quality among 240,000 Quad- 
('itians is a pretty good prom- 
ise of success for the adver- 
tiser who lias quality mer- 
chandise to >ell and does it 
wisely through the use of 
WHBF-TV now received by 
over 110,000 T\ set owners. 

Lcs Johnson, V.P. and Cen. Mgr. 




WHBF 

TELC0 BUILDING, ROCK ISLAND, ILLINOIS 

Represented by Avery-Knodel, Inc. 



THE / Jkwfc 

/ HOT. SPRINGS 

GOLDEN 1 * * - 




TRIANGLE 



KCMC 

(AM FM) 



NlARKy 



TEXARKANA 
• •' Ark., Tex 



KAMD 

CAMDEN, Ark. 




DELIVERS 
READY SALES 



571,000 PEOPLE 

$420,267,000 Effective Buying Power 

$367,535,000 Retail Sales 



*From Safes Management 



the ARKTEX STATIONS 

ONE ORDER • ONE CLEARANCE 

ONE BILLING 

Sold singly or in groups 

For details, write to: 

FRANK O. MYERS, Gen. Mgr. 

Gazette Bldg., Texarkana, Arlc-Tex. 



an, Polish, Russian. Spanish, Ukranian. 



Q. How much does time cost on 
a representative group of stations? 

A. It costs $712 for one hour weekly 
for 13 weeks or $80 for one minute 
weekly on WOV, New York, and these 
eight other members of the Foreign 
Quality Language Network: WSBC, 
Chicago; WSRS, Cleveland; KOWL, 
Santa Monica; WJMJ. Philadelphia; 
WHOD, Homestead, Pa.; KSAN, San 
Francisco; WACE. Chicopee, Mass., 
and WHAY, New Britain, Conn. You 
can take either language or both; they 
list a listenership potential of 3,575,600 
Italians and 2,009.125 Poles. (Only 
four of the stations carry Polish. I 



Q. Is the Spanish-language mar- 
ket important? 

A. Si. Besides New York's 350,000 
Spanish-speaking Americans, there are 
525,000 persons in the Los Angeles 
area who would feel at home in Mexico 
City or Madrid, 300,000 in the San 
Francisco-Oakland area and a whop- 
ping 1.3 million in Texas (figure used 
by the Texas Spanish Language Broad- 
casters) . Financially, they compare fa- 
vorably with other nationality groups. 
Example: In the Los Angeles area one- 
half the 105,000 Mexican families own 
TV sets, 68% live in their own homes. 
74% have autos and — note this — 98% 
have radios. 



Q. Can the sponsor reach the 
Spanish - language market with 
border stations? 

A. Much of it. XEGM of Tijuana, 
Mexico, claims 750,000 Spanish-Amer- 
icans in its coverage area extending to 
San Luis Obispo County north of Los 
Angeles. Others, which program com- 
pletely in Spanish: ZEJ, Juarez; ZEAS, 
Nuevo Laredo; ZEAC, Tijuana: XED. 
Mexicali; XEMU, Piedras Negras; 
XEO, Matamoros; XEOR, Reynosa; 
KICO, Calexico. You can hit harder on 
these programs, advertise products 
banned from U. S. air. Example: hard 
liquor. But don't forget the many ex- 
cellent U. S. stations near the border. 
(SPONSOR has a complete list of Span- 
ish-language stations available on re- 
quest.) 



Q. What are the trends in for- 
eign-language broadcasting? 



A. 1. More national advertisers are 
using it than ever. Sampling: 

National Shoes, Procter & Gamble, 
Red Cross Salt, Ward's Tip Top Bread. 
Busch Credit Jewelers, RCA Victor, 
Eastern Airlines, Pan American Air- 
ways, General Foods, Sabena Airlines, 
Gallo Wine, Gem Oil, Pepsi-Cola. 
Quaker Oats, Lucky Strike, Bond 
Bread, Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, Carna- 
tion Milk, Nestle, Planter's Nut & Choc- 
olate Co., Babbitt, Kirsch Beverages. 

On co-op programs: most name- 
brand appliances, DuMont TV, GE 
Frigidaire, Eaglo Paints, Ruppert's, 
Schlitz, and Pabst beer. 

On border stations in Mexico you'll 
find many of the above plus Pet Milk, 
Old Golds, Camels, Philco Products, 
Kellogg's Corn Flakes, Calvert's, Good- 
rich Tires, Westinghouse, Norge, and 
Bendix. 

2. Programs are improving. More 
are like English-language shows than 
ever. Soap operas are written for the 
language group. Highly popular are 
disk jockeys, folk music, Mr. and Mrs. 
type shows, amateur nights, comedy 
sketches, news, and (Italian especially) 
transcriptions of interviews with rela- 
tives and friends back home, which 
WOV features. Even American jazz is 
being recorded in foreign tongues. Ex- 
ample: "The Thing" was waxed in 
Italian, Polish, Yiddish, Spanish, and 
German ("Das Ding"). However, the 
programs out of town still have a long 
way to go, says Rino Negri, Emil Mo- 
gul Co.'s v.p. in charge of foreign-lan- 
guage media. "They're 10 years be- 
hind New York," he adds. 

3. Americanization of second and 
third generations continues, and the 
total number of foreign-born whites is 
decreasing (11.419,138 in 1940, 10,- 
147,000 in 1950). But listenership re- 
mains at an all-time peak because of 
better programs, the influx of DP's and 
Puerto Ricans and the listener's natu- 
ral love of his native tongue and cus- 




86 



SPONSOR 




- - - radio 
campaign 

in 

Southern 

California? 



INSURE 



ITS 



SUCCESS! 




There's More 




SELL 



on 



UJRIU 



RICHMOND 
VIRGINIA 
910kc-5kw 
ABC 

AFFILIATE 
• 

National 

Representatives 

EDWARD 

PETRY 

& CO., INC. 



loins, according to Charles Baltin. v. p.. 
W MOM. New York. 

4. TV will make inroads into the 
market but not nearly as deeply as in 
the others, according to the experts. 
Lhe} list two reasons: lal the for- 
eign-language listener is so loyal to 
his program he will tune it in for the 
brief period it's usually on in prefer- 
ence to anything else on the air; i b I 
TV's too expensive to use extensively 
for slanting toward specialized audi- 
ences. At present only three stations 
in the U. S. are offering anything to 
the foreign-language viewer: WOR-TV, 
New York, which uses Italian films: 
\\ PIX, New York, which uses English 
programs designed to attract Italian- 
Americans, and WBKB, Chicago, 
which also uses Italian films. 



Q. What tips do the experts in 
the field have for the prospective 
sponsor? 

A. Know the market or get someone 
who does, say Joseph Ruggiero and 
William Ashley (For joe & Co.). Nat 
Roth I'Furman, Feiner & Co.), Rich- 
ard Jacobs (Joseph Jacobs Org.) and 
Rino Negri (Mogul I. 

Be careful of the language (your 
foreign-language group may speak a 
dialect). Know your market limita- 
tions. Example: Don't try to sell non- 
kosher meat to New York's Jewish 
families. 80.8 '/r of whom buy kosher. 
Let the station help you decide on pro- 
graming. Don't throw in a spot and 
expect miracles but plan a campaign 
as carefully as in English-language 
broadcasting. And take advantage of 
the fact that the foreign-language m.c. 
is often a leading personality in the 
community. So work with and through 
him in merchandising your product. 
Example: Eugene Konstantynowicz. 
Polish director of Detroit's WJLB 
who's "Gene" to many thousands in 
the 350,000-strong Polish community. 
Gene recently got 2,022 pieces of mail 
containing 10.110 Felso labels in three 
days with one program. 

3- Any flaws in the foreign- 
broadcasting picture? 

A. Yes. There's little new research 
(some locally by Advertest and Pulse I . 
Multiple spotting is common, mostly 
outside New York. Brokers buy an 
hour, then resell bits to advertisers at 
a profit. Result: commercials lose ef- 
fectiveness. There's no coordination 
nationally or regionally among sta- 



WKOW 

Delivers More Homes 

Per Dollar in 

Wisconsin's Rich 

*Moo4a Market 




* Includes Madison and 

50 prosperous counties 

in central and 

southern Wisconsin 

Here's the one sta- 
tion that really 
blankets the rich 
"Moo-la" market of 
Wisconsin. Day 
after day mail re- 
sponse from all over 
the state and ad- 
joining states is 
proof that WKOW 
is your best radio 
buy in Wisconsin. 

WISCONSIN'S 
MOST POWERFUL 

RADIO STATION 

• 

10,000 WATTS 

• 

MONONA 

BROADCASTING 

COMPANY 

Madison Wisconsin 

• 

Represented by 

HEADLEY REED COMPANY 



1 070 

ON YOUR 

DIAL 



14 JULY 1952 



87 









Sponsors say 

AP News best 

medium they've 

ever used" 



~/ r 



.00MT**- 



+%* - 



Ward A. Coleman 
General Manager 

WENC, Whiteville, N. C. 



"Our AP newscasts are a powerful influ- 
ence in this area," says Mr. Coleman. "We 
actually hear from many husbands that sup- 
per is late because the housewives insist oh 
listening to our 6 P.M.*- AP newscast! And 
the advertisers; who sponsor AP news tell 
us it's their best business-getter," 



> J. T. McKenzie, Whiteville appliance 
dealer who sponsors WENC's 6 P.M. AP 
newscast says: "We've been unable to keep 
enough washers in stock since we bought 
the program three years ago! We're thor- 
oughly sold on AP news!" 



"We have a 

waiting list of 

sponsors for our 

AP newscasts" 




George X. Smith 

Vice President and Manager 

KFOR, Lincoln, Nebraska 



CTM 



mi 



aSBaHSsSs 

j B . ' 

pHHta 

fleSfisSSslH 




Hundreds of the country's finest stations announce with pride 



THIS STATION IS A MEM BE, 



■ 

XT 






"H 



?Swi 



"AP newscasts are consistent Hooper 
leaders in our market,'' declares Manager 
Smith. "We consider them most important 
in gaining and holding our listening. audi- 
ence. And AP newscasts stay sold; they are 
seldom available to a new sponsor. We have 
a waiting list for AP news — the news that 
sells* in this metropolitan market!" 

Hardy Furniture Company, sponsor 
of AP news on KFOR for many years, reports: 
"Recently we advertised a quantity of elec- 
tric de-humidifiers at $129.95 — exclusively 
on our AP newscast. Listener response was 
immediate. We sold out completely, re- 
ordered, sold out again!" 





'M 



<^? 



Associated Press . . . constant- 
ly on the job with 

• a news report of 1,000,000 
words every 24 hours. 

• leased news wires of 350,000 
miles in the U.S. alone. 

• exclusive state-by-state news 
circuits. 

• 100 news bureaus in the U.S. 

• offices throughout the world. 

• staff of 7,200 augmented by 
member stations and news- 
papers . . . more than 100,000 
men and women contributing 
daily. 



IT'S AS SIMPLE AS THIS: When 
you feature AP news, you attract 
sponsors . . . when sponsors fea- 
ture AP news, they attract custom- 
ers. That's why so many stations 
have found that AP news is easy 
to sell, easy to keep sold! 

YOU CAN LEARN exactly what 
AP news can accomplish for your 
stations and your sponsors by 
contacting your AP Field Repre- 
sentative, or by writing: 



\ D 



I M » s 



EM 



BRortwfcWerPtafli 



HeKttrtia.^- 



OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS. 



tions i except for the Foreign Language 
Quality Network, which has just issued 
a rate card i . Timebuyers complain 
they have to take a trip to get data. 
There are no standard rates. Programs 
are sometimes very poor. ( But the 
same agency exec who complained of 
the above added: "It's still the cheap- 
est means of reaching an audience I 
know." I 

Q. Who are some of the experts 
in the field? 

A. In New York: Agencies like Emil 
Mogul Co., 250 W. 57th St.: Pettinel- 



la Advertising, 29 Washington Sq. 
West; Furman, Feiner & Co., 117 W. 
46th St.; Joseph Jacobs Org., 1 E. 
42nd St. Radio reps: Forjoe & Co., 
29 W. 57th St.; National Time Sales, 
17 E. 42nd St.; Foreign Language 
Quality Network, 45 W. 57th St. 

Elsewhere (all in the Spanish mar 
ket I : Joseph Belden & Associates 
207V, W. 6th St., Austin. Tex.; Leon 
ard Shane Agency, 104 S. Vermont 
Los Angeles; Hank Hernandez, 632 S 
Catalina St., Los Angeles: Harland G 
Oakes & Associates. 672 S. Lafayette 
Park PI.. Los Angeles. 



Negro market 





77Umc4s 




/-ima&v 1 - 



'■02&L- 



Sell the giant ^« 
German-speaking \ 
audience via \ 




* Pulse 
report on 
request 



YOUR PLAY! YOU WIN EVERY TIME WITH WWRL! 

Only WWRL can penetrate and sell so effectively the vast foreign 
language market and the lucrative Negro market. WWRL reaches each 
foreign group in its native tongue. You can rely on WWRL — 
New York City's Sales Specialist— to MOVE YOUR PRODUCT! 

5000 WATTS • 1600 KILOCYCLES 



Q. Does the Negro market con- 
stitute a sufficiently large segment 
of economic wealth to warrant 
separate consideration by adver- 
tisers? 

A. Marketing authorities agree that 
am group that numbers 15 million and 
earns $15 billion annually — as do the 
Negroes of America — is deserving of 
special attention from those who have 
things to sell. The trend toward direct 
appeal to this market in advertising 
has been especially sharp on the radio 
front. 

Workable and sound concepts as 
to programing for Negro audiences 
have been developed in many areas. 
Surveys disclose that the popular mis- 
conception of Negroes being a second- 
class market is being corrected. Also 
that important national and regional 
advertisers have become aware of Ne- 
gro tastes and have focused their ef- 
forts in that direction, with highly 
gainful results. I sponsor in a subse- 
quent issue will carry an article with 
extensive updated material on this mar- 
ket. ) 

Evidence of sales success in this field 
may be seen in the number of adver- 
tisers who renew and expand their op- 
erations after tentative experiments. 
For example. WPAL, Charleston, S. C, 
reports: "Approximately 97% of the 
accounts which first started with us in 
Negro programing nearly four years 
ago are still with us. and a large per- 
centage of them — both local and na- 
tional - are periodically increasing 
their budget with us, rather than cur- 
taining or remaining static." 

One of the keys to the success of Ne- 
gro programing is the care with which 
stations have selected personnel to han- 
dle this programing. In most instances, 
stations start with a disk jockey show 
and are able to get a well known local 
personality to do the job. The impor- 
tance of this step lies in the fact that 
the d.j. starts off with a good degree of 
acceptance, quickly develops a loyal 
audience by heavy participation iu 
local affairs in the community. Fund 
drives, dances, and social affairs of all 
sorts call on the d.j. for personal ap- 
pearances, all of which considerably 
enhances his reputation and audience. 

In this day of increasing merchandi- 
sing consciousness, many stations 
might well study the job being done by 



90 



SPONSOR 



Negro d.j.'s for some of the more pro- 
gressive stations. Programs catering 
to non-white audiences frequently 
originate in supermarkets, department 
stores, and other retail outlets. In- 
creased store traffic is inevitable. 
WDIA, Memphis, for example, blankets 
grocery and drug outlets in its area 
with monthly lists of advertisers, re- 
minding them that advertised products 
are easier for the merchant to sell. The 
station also named popular disk jockey 
A. C. Williams as fulltime promotion 
consultant, assigned him to do public 
relations, contact work, and merchan- 
dising among the half million Negroes 
in the counties reached by WDIA. 

The success of these operations has 
supplied the stations with sufficient 
funds to conduct some first-class mar- 
ket studies, supply advertisers with 
valuable information which they can 
use in their campaigns to sell Negroes. 



Transit Radio 



Q. What is the current status of 
Transit Radio? 

A. At the end of May, the Supreme 
Court decided 7-to-l that radio pro- 
grams piped into street cars and buses 
do not violate the Constitutional rights 
of passengers. This ended Transit 
Radio's long tussle in the courts to 
have its legality upheld, and did away 
with a major obstacle to Transit Radio 
expansion. 

Nine cities now have Transit Radio: 
Washington, D. C, Trenton, Worces- 
ter, Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, St. Louis. 
Kansas City, Mo., Des Moines, and 
Tacoma. Since the Supreme Court de- 
cision, Transit Radio headquarters in 
Cincinnati has had about 50 inquiries 
from FM stations ( the only type which 
carry T-R programs), about 40 of 
which represent cities where T-R is 
economically feasible. These include 
Honolulu, Atlanta, Grand Rapids, Bos- 
ton, Indianapolis, Milwaukee, Miami, 
Buffalo, Philadelphia, San Francisco, 
Richmond. 

According to R. C. Crisler, presi- 
dent of Transit Radio, Inc., "There is 
no question but what a great many 
advertisers have avoided Transit Radio 
because of the overhanging legal prob- 
lems. At the same time, it has been 
difficult to maintain salesmen's morale 
when confronted with an irrefutable 
excuse not to buy." Steps toward the 



i eestablishment of national sales facili- 
ties have been taken. National adver- 
tiser reaction to the favorable Supreme 
Court ruling has not been measurable, 
so far, since these facilities are not \ el 
in full operation." 

No changes have been made in basic 
T-R programing, which has been 
found to be satisfactory and consists 
of music, news, time and weather an- 
nouncements, and sports scores. Com- 
mercials are short and spaced at least 
five minutes apart. 



Q. What advertisers have been 
using Transit Radio and with what 
results? 

A. At present, Transit Radio lias on 
its roster between 150 ami 200 local 
sponsors and half a dozen national ad- 
vertisers. These include \\ hitehall 
I'harmacal, Fanny Farmer Candy, Con- 
tinental Baking i Wonder Bread i . 
Brown & Williamson I Raleigh cigar- 
ettes), and Bell Telephone. During the 
litigation period, according to Crisler. 
national advertisers shied away from 




No. 36 OF A SERIES 



ED CARTWRIGHT 

In Runs Batted In * 

WHEC 

In Rochester Radio! 






IN ROCHESTER 432 weekly quarter hour periods are 
Pulse surveyed and rated. Here's the latest score,— 





STATION 

WHEC 


STATION 

B 


STATION 

C 


STATION 

D 


STATION 

E 


STATION 

F 


FIRSTS.. 


. . .216. 


.159.. 


...20. 


...0.. 


0.. 


... 


TIES . 


35. 


. 35 


... 0. 


...0.. 


...0.. 


, , , 



WHEC carries ALL of the "top ten" daytime shows! 
WHEC carries SIX of the "top ten" evening shows 

PULSE BI-MONTHLY REPORT— MARCH-APRIL, 1952 

IATCST MFORE ClOtING TIME 



BUY WHERE THEY RE LISTENING:- 




WHEC 





ett&l 



NEW YORK 
5,000 WATTS 



Ktprtttntalivty EVERETT-McKINNEY, Int. New Yorlt, Cni'cogo, LEE F. O'CONNEll CO., Loj Angtlty Son Froncuco 



14 JULY 1952 



91 




CBS 



WRDlrV 



STATIONS 

AUGUSTA, GA. 

*«T. POP. 179,272 

PLUS 

H-BOMB PLANT & 

CAMP GORDON 

85,000 



ABC COLUMBIA, S.C. 

MIT. POP. 144,000 

U/ /• A Q &m 

ft V V/ O FT. JACKSON 
60,000 



NBC COLUMBUS, GA. 
I.I IV * is *"• POP * 169 ' 921 

l/v D A K ?j^ 

If If /I IN FT. BENNING 
42,000 



NBC MACON, GA. 

BIBB CO. 136,300 

•V D 1*1 L WARNER ROBINS 
27,000 



for complete information 
call HEADLEY-REED CO. 



Here are the FACTS about 

KROD'S MARKET AREA 

The El Paso Southwest! 



From May 10, 
1952 Sales Man- 
agement 





POPULATION 

RETAIL 

SALES $508,523,000 

FOOD 

SALES 111,255,000 

CEN. MDSE. 

SALES 57,945,000 

AUTOMOTIVE KROD 

SALES 101,241,000 „ as the greatest cover- 
, UC „ age of any radio sta- 

SALES 24,728,000 rj0 n in El Paso, regard- 

less of power. 

The El Paso Southwest is a steadily, soundly grow- 
ing area. It's expanding economy is based on indus- 
try, agriculture, ranching and other important sources. 
You can sell it more completely and economically 
over KROD. 



CBS RADIO NETWORK IN EL PASO 



T-R on the premise that it might he a 
vanishing medium not worth their re- 
search or experimentation. Local ad- 
vertisers, however, seeking immediate 
benefits and not engaged in such long- 
term thinking, have remained more or 
less indifferent to the legal proceedings 
and have been consistent clients. The 
number of these local advertisers have 
increased from 50 to 100% since last 
year in the various T-R markets. 

The experience of Kent Jewelers in 
Washington, D. C, illustrates results 
obtainable from Transit Radio. ARBI 
conducted a newspaper-vs.-Transit Ra- 
dio test in which Kent spent $350 for 
space in the Washington Times-Herald, 
and the same amount for announce- 
ments over WWDC-FM. Advertising 
featured men's and women's watches 
for $8.88. Results showed that 62.1% 
of all customers contacted had learned 
about the watches through Transit Ra- 
dio; 16.1% through the newspaper. 

Advantages of Transit Radio for the 
advertiser are summed up by President 
Crisler as follows: "Transit Radio de- 
livers a guaranteed audience, so that 
the advertiser knows exactly how many 
listeners he is getting for his money; 
he does not have to resort to unusual 
or expensive programing." 



Q. What about cost-per-1, 000? 

A. It's low, averaging $1.00 per 1,000 
listeners during off-peak hours and 75c 
per 1,000 listeners during peak hours. 
The figures are higher in small commu- 
nities and lower in largest cities. 



Q. What's the fall outlook for 
Transit Radio? 

A. Bright with expectations of growth 
and prosperity, according to President 
Crisler. "We feel we are in a more 
favorable position today than we were 
two and three years ago when our ini- 
tial expansion was taking place," he 
said. The number of sponsors they can 
expect this fall, he added, will depend 
on the sales setup which is established. 



FM 



600 KC 



5,000 WATTS 



RODERICK BROADCASTING Corp. 

REPRESENTED BY THE 0. L TAYLOR COMPANY 



Q. What is FM's value to the ad- 
vertiser? 

A. The NARTB and RTMA have har- 
nessed the energy of broadcasters, dis- 
tributors, and retailers in digging out 



the FM story — why it exists, why sta- 
tions use it, and what it offers in extra 
program choice and improved hear- 
ability. The major finding of NARTB- 
RTMA research has been that more 
people listen to FM because they have 
to than because they prefer the tone. 
These are people living in a "white 
spot" area not within the nighttime 
umbrella of local AM stations. 

Here only FM duplications of AM 
broadcasts will get favorite programs 
into the living room. Residents of sec- 
tions where the AM signal is frequent- 
ly cut by industrial static, weather, and 
foreign broadcasts are in the same 
predicament as the fellow - listener 
whose home town enjoys no after dark 
radio service except by FM. And. 
since it is well established that "listen- 
er loyalty" tends to favor nearby call 
letters, the advertiser's commercial is 
most apt to be heard on a so-called 
"local" radio station. 



Q. Where are such listening con- 
ditions prevalent? 

A. Conditions of this type are more 
prevalent in the South than elsewhere 
in the United States: in the Carolinas, 
Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Louisiana, 
Virginia, and Kentucky. But the situ- 
ation is not localized below the Mason- 
Dixon line. There are areas which de- 
pend on FM for clear reception in 
Ohio, New York. Massachusetts, West 
Virginia, California. Pennsylvania, and 
many other states. 



Q. How does the future look for 
FM? 

A. FM's growth has been slow but 
steady. And it seems certain to con- 
tinue. At present more than 8,500,000 
people own FM receivers and 650 AM- 
FM stations are on the air. Of these, 
approximately 30% now program FM 
separately on at least a partial basis. 
New FM applicants include WEBC, 
Duluth; WMOU, Berlin, N. H.; WT- 
WN, St. Johnsbury, Vt.; WCPS, Tar- 
boro, N. C; WJOI, Florence, Ala.; 
WWWB, Jasper, Ala. 

Other well-known stations who are 
adding FM or expanding their FM 
operation include WGAR, Cleveland, 
scheduled to put its FM transmitter in 
operation shortly; WBEN, Buffalo, in- 
creasing its FM facilities and power in 
the fall; WBT, Charlotte, which has 
extended its FM hours of operation. 



92 



SPONSOR 



Q. Have advertisers been making 
successful use of this specialized 
FM audience? 

A. Zenith, with an FM campaign for 
its hearing aid this spring, achieved 
these results: 

In North Carolina sales leads from 
FM were five times those from other 
media at 5.4% the average cost of 
other media. 

Michigan "pull" was two times 
greater than other media at 12.!!' , 
average cost of other media. 

WJLN-FM, Birmingham, Ala., ran 
a test on FM some months ago to find 
out who the listeners were and where 
they lived. The first 500 responding 
were to receive as a gift a lighter 
shaped like a Coco-Cola bottle. The 
station received over 1,000 letters 
from 163 Alabama towns. Of these re- 
plies 90% were from outside the WL- 
JN-AM coverage area. This in itself 
was indicative of WJLN-FM's special 
coverage. 

Griesedieck Brewery of St. Louis 
carries the Cardinal baseball games on 
WSOY-FM only (Decatur, 111.) Last 
season the local distributor reported an 
increase in sales. 

WFLN-FM, Philadelphia, told spon- 
sor about these typical one-year-or- 
over advertisers: The Record Mart 
(2%), Allan Radio Company (2), C. 
H. Davis Inc. ll), Browning Chevrolet 
(2), Colonial Motors (2), Lester Piano 
Co. (2), Otto R. Trefz Jr. Co. (2). 





4 Reasons Why 

The foremost national and local ad 
vertisers use WEVD year afte> 
year to reach the vast 

Jewish Market 
of Metropolitan New York 
I. Top adult programming 
2. Strong audience impact 
3. Inherent listener loyalty 
4. Potential buying power 

Send for a copy of 
"WHO'S WHO ON WEVD" 
HENRY GREENFIELD 

Managing Director 

WEVD 117-119 West 46th St.. 

New York 19 



One advertiser. Bishop \ Hedlicig. ad- 
vertised Rittenhouse Fund la mutual 
fund i and had to go off the air tem- 
porarily after six months to catch up 
with sales leads. KITE-FM's Chuck 
Balthrope (San Antonio) reports: 
■\\ ith KITE-FM's rates we're reach- 
ing bigger-income homes for the same 
low cost-per-hundred as on four-year 
old KITE-AM during the daytime. 
KITE-FM, when only six months old, 
had practical proof of a measurable 
and growing audience. Its programing 
has resurrected an interest in those 
40,000 homes equipped to hear FM. 
Thus the advertisers on KITE-FM are 
reaching an audience not covered b) 
any other medium at an extremely low 
cost." 

Storecasting 

Q. What does Storecasting do for 
its sponsors? 

A. Storecasting, established in 1946, 
is a combination broadcast-and-mer- 
chandising service offered to grocery 
and drug manufacturers selling their 
products in supermarkets. Via FM ra- 
dio, it currently reaches about 700 
supermarkets in five major areas: 
Southern New England (WMMW-FM, 
Meriden. Conn.) ; Northern New Jer- 
sey (WGHF); Philadelphia (WIBG- 
FM); Pittsburgh (WKJF) ; Chicago 
(WFMF). Audiences of more than 3,- 
500,000 customer-listeners hear the 
broadcasts while shopping in the First 
National Stores of Southern New Eng- 
land; the National Food Stores, Chi- 
cago; Acme Markets, Philadelphia. 
Pittsburgh, Northern New Jersey; the 
Thorofare and Giant Eagle chains in 
Pittsburgh. 

Storecast billing this year, up slight- 
ly from last, is around $750,000. At 
the moment, 135 sponsors plug some 
260 products via Storecast. Sponsors 
using Storecast have the advantage of 
reaching customers right at the point 
of sale in the midst of shopping 

An integral part of Storecast service 
to advertisers is its extensive merchan- 
dising and promotional activity aimed 
to benefit both store and sponsor. 
Crews of grocery and drug merchan- 
dising specialists make more than 450 
personal service calls to supermarkets 
every week to certify that all Storecast 
products are in good supply; that they 
have the best possible shelf position 
and numerous other advantages. 




recommends 



TEXAS'5 th MARKET/i 

the rich, industrial 
tri-city area 



BEAU,MONTT\ ___^j 
""'v ORANGE ' 

s \ 

(lEff-ERSON CO.) 



KPAC serves a population of 236,100 \ 
in the rich Beaumont — Port Arthur- 
Orange metropolitan tri-city area. 

KPAC is the No. 1 radio salesman 
for local sponsors in the world's No. 
1 oil refining area. 




5000 WATTS 



JOHN E. PEARSON CO. 
National Representative* 



NEWS on 
KMBC-KFRM 

is TOPS... 

...because KMBC-KFRM 

stays orTtop'of the NEWS! 




And there is no greater value today 
than radio news ! 

KMBC - KFRM news programs are the 
most-listenedto newscasts in the heart 
of America. They enjoy their high rat- 
ings because of the reputation for accu- 
racy and immediacy built by the KMBC- 
KFRM News Department. 

Hereisatremendous sales potential in 
one of the nation's richest markets. ..the 
great Kansas City Primary trade area. 

Call KMBC-KFRM or ask your nearest 
Free & Peters' colonel for complete de- 
tails on the mighty voice of the KMBC- 
KFRM Team and for newscast availa- 
bilities. 



KMBC 

of Kansas City 

KFRM 

for Rural Kansas 



6th oldest CBS Affiliate 



14 JULY 1952 



93 




It takes 3 other 
stations combined 
to beat WFBL's 
daytime share of 
radio audience in 
Syracuse, N. Y. 



WFBL gives you MORE AUDIENCE per advertising 
dollar than any other Syracuse medium. For MORE 
SALES in a Great Market, advertise on WFBL. 

For Proof — 

Call Free & Peters Inc. 

Exclusive National Representatives 
or WFBL Direct 



WFBL 




MEMBER CBS NETWORK 



Syracuse, New York 



94 



Q. Who uses Storecasting? 

A. A host of nationally advertised 
brands are included among the 260- 
odd food, grocery and drug products 
currently on the Storecast roster, such 
as: Armour Meats, Jell-O, My-T-Fine 
Desserts, Beech-Nut Baby Foods, Lib- 
by's Baby Foods. Pepsi-Cola, Yet Tis- 
sues, Brer Rabbit Molasses, Hormal 
Chile Con Carne, Snow Crop Orange 
Juice. Mennen Brushless Shave Cream, 
Schaefer Beer, Kraft Salad Dressings, 
Wrisley Soap, Sterling Salt. Among the 
newer advertisers signed are Post 
Toasties, Philip Morris Cigarettes, Blue 
Ribbon Napkins, Good Luck Margar- 
ine, Holiday Instant Coffee, Swift's 
Sausages, Westinghouse Bulbs, White 
Rock Beverages, Swanson Frozen 
Poultry. Many sponsors have expand- 
ed their Storecast schedules over the 
past year. 



Q. What does Storecasring cost? 

A. Rates vary for each market, de- 
pending on the number of stores 
and customers reached. One to 51 
plugs in the Southern New England 
area or the New York-Northern New 
Jersey area cost $6.80 per announce- 
ment; in Philadelphia, $8.65; in Chi- 
cago or Pittsburgh, $9.35. A schedule 
of six announcements per week for 13 
weeks would cost $39.00 a week in 
Southern New England; $49.20 in 
Philadelphia; 53.40 in Chicago. Twelve 
pitches a week would cost a sponsor 
$69.00 a week in New York-Northern 
New Jersey area, $93.60 in Pittsburgh. 
The most intensive schedule listed (24 
announcements per week for 26 weeks) 
in the most expensive markets (Chi- 
cago and Pittsburgh) comes to a total 
of slightly over $4,000.00. 



Q. What results does Storecasting 
get for sponsors? 

A. That sponsors are satisfied with 
Storecast results is borne out by the 
continued renewal rate of about 70%. 
Storecast has scored boosts in product 
sales of 25% to 150%. 

So that advertisers may see exactly 
what results Storecast obtains for their 
products, the Storecast Corporation has 
recently set up a comprehensive "re- 
porting" system. The merchandising 
men who visit the stores fill out a 
Storecast Activities Report which gives 
a day-by-day, store-by-store account of 
just what's happening to each product. 

SPONSOR 



NettvorU programs available on local stations (radio) 



Miiiiwiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim 

ABC radio shows 



MARTIN AGRONSKY 



AMERICA'S TOWN MEETING 



BIG JON AND SPARKIE 



CROSSFIRE 



ELMER DAVIS 



BOB FINNEGAN 



PAULINE FREDERICK 



BOB GARRED 



PAUL HARVEY 



HEADLINE EDITION 



TED MALONE 



DREW PEARSON- 



MR. PRESIDENT 



MARY MARGARET MrBRIDE 



TYPE 


APPEAL 




TIME 


TESTED 


EXPLANATION 


News 


General 


IS 


min. 


6/wk 


yes 


One of the nation's best-known news analysts 


Forum 


General 


45 


min. 


I »k 


yes 


Popular public forum featuring outstanding leaders 


Children's 
Program 


Juvenile 


15 


min. 


2 wk 


yes 


Fun, stories and adventures 


Radio News 
Conference 


General 


30 


rain. 


l/wk 


yes 


Lively discussions with ABC commentators and prominent personalities 


News 


General 


15 


mln. 


, wk 


yes 


Distinguished news analyst, three-time Peabody award winner 


Sports 


General 


15 


min. 


l/wk 


yes 


Sports news and interviews with sports celebrities 


News 


General 


10 


mln. 


5/wk 


yes 


Expert news analyst and United Nations correspondent 


News 


General 


15 


mln. 


1, wk 


yes 


Fifteen fast factual minutes of new* 


News 


General 


15 


min. 


5/wk 


yes 


One of radio's most dynamic news commentators 


News 


General 


10 


min. 


5/wk 


yes 


On-the-spot news and interviews with editor-narrator Taylor Grant 


Narrative 


General 


15 


mln. 


l/wk 


yes 


Human interest stories 


News 


General 


15 


min. 


1 wk 


yes 


One of the great news personalities In radio today 



30 mln. l/wk 



Historical drama based on Incidents In lives of U. S. presidents with 
Edward Arnold 



30 min. 5 wk 



Interviews personalities of national and international prominence on current 
accomplishments 



WSPA Has The Strongest Pulsebeat In 
The Carolina-Piedmont (spartanburggreenviue) Area I 



This past April... The Pulse, Inc., completed a 
comprehensive survey of who's-listening-to-what-and-when in 
these seven representative counties in part of our WSPA area 
. . . Cherokee, Greenville, Laurens, Spartanburg and Union in 
South Carolina — Polk and Rutherford in North Carolina. 



Here's What It Proved Here's Why! 



From 6:00 A.M. to 12:00 Noon 

WSPA enjoys more than THREE 
TIMES the audience of the next 
highest of the seven stations 
reported in the seven counties 
surveyed! 

From 12:00 Noon to 6:00 P.M. 

WSPA enjoys more than THREE 
TIMES the audience of the next 
highest station! 

From 6:00 P.M. to 8:00 P.M. 

WSPA enjoys nearly FOUR TIMES 
the audience of the next highest 
station! 



In this prosperous, populous 
Carolina-Piedmont (Spartanburg- 
Greenville) Area... WSPA is tops in 
Showmanship because — in addition 
to the great CBS shows — our program 
is spiced with our own popular WSPA 
personalities and interspersed with 
accurate and frequent local, national 
and international news coverage. 
That's what keeps WSPA on top in 
audience preference! 




And. ..Can We Sell! 

Just call any John Blair man! He'll gladly give you 
all the details and figures pertinent to our huckstering 
ability in this rich, ready-to-buy, 17-county market. 



Represented By 

John Blair & Co. 



Harry E. Cummings 

Southeastern Representative 



First CBS Radio Station For 
The Spartanburg-Greenville Market 



Roger A. Shaffer 

Managing Director 



Ross Holmes 

Sales Manager 




5,000 WATTS 950 KC 

South Carolina's Oldest Station 

SPARTANBURG, S. C. 



14 JULY 1952 



95 



NO SCHOOL TODAY 


Children's 
Program 


Juvenile 


90 milt. 


l/wk 


yes 


Saturday morning funfest of stories and songs with Big Jon & Sparkle 




PIANO PLAYHOUSE 






Music 


General 


30 min. 


l/wk 


yes 


Piano music featuring Margaret and Forrest Perrin and guest artists 




GEORGE SOKOLSKY 


Commentary 


General 


15 min. 


l/wk 


yes 


Noted syndicated columnist, lecturer and commentator 




*Co-op in limited markets 

MBS radio shows 


01 


ly. 

















BAUKHAGE TALKING 



CECIL BROWN 



CRIME DOES NOT PAY 



BILL CUNNINGHAM NEWS 



GRACIE FIELDS SHOW 



CEDRIC FOSTER 



THE HARDY FAMILY 



ROBERT HURLEIGH 



I LOVE A MYSTERY 



FULTON LEWIS. JR. 



MAGAZINE THEATRE 



MEN'S CORNER 



MGM THEATRE OF THE AIR 



POOLE'S PARADISE 



RUKEYSER REPORTS 



STORY OF DR. KILDARE 
TAKE A NUMBER 



TELL YOUR NEIGHBOR 



WAR FRONT— HOME FRONT 



TYPE 


APPEAL 




Tl 


ME 


EXPLANATION 


News 


Family 


15 


min. 


5/wk 


Distinguished Washington correspondent talks 


News 


Family 


15 


min. 


5/wk 


World traveler and newscaster 


Drama 


Family 


30 


min. 


1 wk 


Detective mystery adventure with MGM cast 


News 


Family 


i;, 


min. 


l/wk 


Syndicated columnist analyzes news 


Music 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


Famous entertainer and MGM supporting cast 


News 


Family 


15 


min. 


5 wk 


Well known news commentator 


Drama 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


Andy and the Judge in their famous series 



Family 



15 min. 5 wk Midwest editor and commentator 



Mystery 



Family 



15 min. 5/wk Famous Carlton E. Morse series 



News 


Family 


15 


min. 


5/wk 


Washington news and interpretation 


Drama 


Family 


25 


min. 


l/wk 


Dramatizations of magazine stories 


Fashion 


Men 


15 


min. 


1 wk 


Bert Bachrach and guests give tips to men 


Drama 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


Top-notch dramatic presentations 


Music 


Family 


60 


min. 


5 wk 


Zany disk jockey 


Finance 


Adult 


15 


min. 


l/wk 


Layman's guide to finance 


Drama 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


Lew Ayres and Lionel Barrymore co-star in this 


Quiz 


Family 


30 


min. 


5/wk 


Quiz with Red Benson as m.c. 


Drama 


Family 


15 


min. 


5 wk 


Good neighbor stories and awards 



News 



Family 



30 min. l/wk News direct from Korea front 



NBC radio shows 



TITLE 




TYPE 


APPEAL 




TIME 


TESTED 


EXPLANATION 




BILL STERN'S SPORTS REV 


EW 


Sports 


General 


15 


min. 


5/wk 


yes 


Comprehensive sports coverage and features 




DANGEROUS ASSIGNMENT 


Adventure 


General 


25 


nun 


1 wk 


yes 


Brian Donlevy in tales of international intrigue 




HOME EDITION OF THE NEWS 


News 


General 


15 


min. 


5/wk 


yes 


Merrill Mueller in a midday newscast 




HOWDY DOODY 


Variety 


Juvenile 


60 


min. 


l/wk 


yes 


Radio edition of famed kid puppet show 




H. V. KALTENBORN 


News 


General 


15 


min. 


2/wk 


yes 


Dean of commentators with analysis 




RICHARD HARKNESS 


News 


General 


15 


min. 


4 wk 


yes 


Expert interpretation of news 




KATE SMITH 


Variety 


Family 


,;d 


min. 


5/wk 


yes 


All-around wrap-up of matters of interest by Smith and Ted Collins 




NEWS OF THE WORLD 


News 


General 


15 


min. 


5/wk 


yes 


Morgan Beatty with a late night news interpretation 




TALES OF THE TEXAS RANGERS 


Western 
Adventure 


General 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


yes 


Joel McCream stars in police case histories 




WORLD NEWS ROUNDUP 


News 


General 


15 


min. 


7/wk 


yes 


News roundup from NBC correspondents 




ROOTIE KAZOOTIE 


Puppet show 


Juvenile 


to 


min. 


l/wk 


yes 


Fantastic cast of hand puppets in delightful fantasies 




AMERICAN FORUM OF AIR 


Forum 


General 


ill 


min. 


l/wk 


yes 


Prominent people discuss issues of day 




WHO SAID THAT 


News Quiz 


Grnrl al 


30 


linn 


l/wk 


yes 


Walter Kiernan, Bill Henry and guest celebrities 





Co-op radio 



Q. How will 1952 spending in 
dealer co-operative radio adver- 
tising compare with last year? 

A. According to the Broadcast Ad- 
vertising Bureau, spending will in- 
crease. But actual dollar figures are 
hard to pin down because of the com- 
plexity and local nature of co-op ad- 
vertising. Double-billing (see 16 June 
SPONSOR) also masks the amount of 
money spent since part of the national 
advertisers' dollar contributions are 
pocketed by hard-dealing retailers. It 
has been estimated, however, that 
$100,000,000 was spent in co-op radio 
advertising last year. 



Q. What are some of the big prob- 
lems facing a national advertiser 
who is considering adding radio to 
his list of approved co-op media? 

A. The national advertiser may find 
that retailers know too much about 
how to save (or make) money on co- 
op advertising through double-billing 
deals with dollar-hungry stations. 
Where his distribution setup is large 
and complex, the manufacturer would 
do well to set up a simple and easy-to- 
understand co-op plan for radio. Pro- 
viding transcriptions and advertising 
copy is a common answer to the prob- 
lem of how to insure effective use of 
the medium by dealers. 



Top spot agencies 

Q. What ad agencies are ex- 
pected to be most active in spot 
radio this fall? 

A. These advertising agencies will be 
placing some of the largest schedules 
and heaviest dollar volumes of spot 
radio business: 

BBDO; J. Walter Thompson; Young 
& Rubicam; William Esty; Benton & 
Bowles; N. W. Ayer; Ted Bates; 
SSCB; Ruthrauff & Ryan; Dancer-Fitz- 
gerald-Sample. Especially active in 
the Midwest will be Chicago agencies 
like Arthur Meyerhoff and Foote, Cone 
& Belding. 



96 



SPONSOR 




ALL THIS IN ONE SPOT 



• . . MAXIMUM POTENTIAL 

NBC Spot Sales represents radio and 
television stations in 10 markets that ac- 
count for nearly 50' < of the nation's 
retail sales. 

. . . BETTER SERVICE 

Separate radio and television, sales, traffic 
and research stalls provide quick, accurate 
information for planning and placing spot 
advertising campaigns. 

. . . RESULTS 

Fifteen powerful radio and television 
stations provide outstanding local pro- 
gramming to put \onr sales message 
across. 



Join our Success Story roster — buy your 
spot advertising thru NBC Spot Sales, 
representatives for: 

New York WNBC Radio WNBT Television 

Chicago WMAQ Radio WNBQ Television 

Cleveland WTAM Radio WNBK Television 

Los Angeles KNBH Television 

San Francisco KNBC Radio 

Philadelphia WPTZ Television 

Roston WBZ-TV Television 

Denver KOA Radio 

Schenectady WGY Radio WRGB Television 

Washington WRC Radio WNBW Television 



NBC 



SPOT 



SALES 30 Rockefeller I Ma/a. New York 20, N.Y. 



CHICAGO • CLEVELAND . WASHINGTON • SAN FRANCISCO • HOLLYWOOD 



DENVER • ATLANTA* • CHARLOTTE* 
*Bomar Loivrancr & Issociates 



14 JULY 1952 



97 



one low rate 



u 



corners" this 



great 
West Virginia 




*+j£ 



q,..\. 



r-~ 7*"^ 



£ 



5&2 



•42 



*r 



/=v^ 



Vi-if < 



-\ < 



(~° 



\'/?Ml\ 



: -^...:: F -^ 



MX 



--K 



s? 



,:••• 



%**L 






m§£^m: 






i. 



....(. 



\£ 



..... 



.k_. 



.jt>-\ ■'■■■ 



* 









BKKUT, 



,*.. /— : 



^c 









jfejf 



m 



Here's the lush potential of "Personality's" half-millivolt area alonel 



TOTAL POPULATION 


992,994 


TOTAL FAMILIES 


250,337 


RETAIL SALES 


$543,571,000 


FOOD SALES 


$111,735,000 


GENERAL MERCHANDISE SALES 


$80,496,000 


FURNITURE AND 




HOUSEHOLD GOODS SALES 


$29,969,000 


EFFECTIVE BUYING INCOME 


$965,894,000 



POWER 



PROGRAMMING 



PROMOTION 



EXPERIENCE 



Two power-pocked stations to provide 
a double "knockout" punch . . with FM 
for good measure. 



The best in ABC and CBS network 
radio, plus a local flavoring of pro- 
gramming and news. 

Publishing monthly audience-building 
consumer magazines to help promote 
your program and product. 

Operated jointly and staffed by com- 
petent, capable personnel who live . . 
and love . . radio. 



Source — U.S. Census and 8MB Survey, 1950 



BECKLEY — 560KC 

CBS Radio Network Affiliate 

1000 W DAY* 500 W NIGHT 








if cosfs less when you use "Personality" \ "^A 

ions J> 




Joe L. Smith, Jr., Incorporated • represented nationally by Weed & Co. 



I 
I 



I 




In sponsor's Radio Basics section, which has gained accept- 
ance as the industry's primer on the subject, are charted the 
outstanding facts coacerning radio and its use in the fall of 
this year. In an easy-to-follow progression, the advertiser 
and his agency will learn from the section's charts and ta- 
bles just what the dimensions and scope of radio really are. 

Starting with the latest facts on the number of U.S. radio 
sets and homes, he'll learn how these sets are distributed 
about the homes in outside-the-living-room locations, how 
much listening is done over-all and how much is added by 
the growing number of out-of-home radio receivers. 

Radio's circulation vs. other media, differences in listen- 
ing hour-by-hour, seasonal variations in listening and radio 
ratings, cost-per-1,000 figures, spot radio costs — all these are 
detailed — and analyzed where necessary. 

Networks, stations, station representatives, agencies, and 
independent research firms have contributed to this section 
which gives the advertiser truly "basic" data as well as some 
of the most up-to-date and advanced research findings. To 
locate the different topics covered, use the index at right, 
although sponsor advises a start-at-the-beginning reading. 

14 JULY 1952 



I Dimensions of radio's 
audience 



WO 



II Radio listening habits / f / » 



III Cost of radio adver- 
tising' 



IV IC.-iilio's billings 



Hit 



124 



V Kadio vs. TV coverage t »ha • 
in TV cities 



I2G 



VI Where in-home listen- g. 
ing is clone 



I2H 




99 



1. How many U.S. homes have radio? 



SOURCE: Joint Radio Network Committee Report, I January 1952 




96% have radios 

42,800,000 homes 



4% have no radios 

1,937,900 homes 



■ 



■ 

sir 
I 

I 



I! 



I . S. radio sets now total 
over 108,000,000 

Radio set saturation of U. S. is so great it 
can be considered 100% for many areas. 
Figures at left are average for whole coun- 
try, including over-96 f ( metropolitan areas 
and slightly less-saturated rural areas. Total 
sets for summer 1952 is over 108,000,000. 



2. How many sets are there per home? 



SOURCE: American Research Bureau study for ABC, January 1952 







One set 

17,020,000 homes 
or 39.8% 



Two sets Three or more sets 

15,080,000 homes 10,700,000 homes 
or 35.2% or 25.0% 



Si.v of 10 homes have 
more thiin one set 

One-set homes are in the minority. 
Six out of 10 homes have two or 
more radios. In big TV cities num- 
ber of multiple-set homes is high- 
er. Pulse study in 20 TV cities 
(for BAB) put number of two-set 
homes at 37.1 %, three-set homes 
at 29.0%. ARB figures at left 
are averages for the entire U. S. 



3. How are multiple sets divided between radio-only and radio-TV homes? 



SOURCE: American Research Bureau study for ABC, January 1952 

U. S. radio-TV homes U. S. radio-only homes 
(39.1%) (60.9%) 



3 OR MORE 
SETS 



2 SETS 



SET 





44.5% 



TV homes have more radios 

In homes which have both radio and TV sets, 
67.5% have more than one radio set, but in 
radio-only homes figure is 55.5%. With 
their greater-than-average number of sets, 
TV family members can continue listening to 
radio conveniently. Part of family can listen 
outside living room while rest view TV. 
(Data on rooms where listening takes place in 
radio-TV and radio-only homes on page 128.) 



100 



SPONSOR 



4. How many out-of-home sets are there? 



SOURCE: Joint Radio Network Committee Report, I Jan- 
uary 1952, plus SPONSOR estimate of spring 1952 auto sets 

Out-of-home sets 



Total: 29,419,266 




AUTOMOBILE PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS 

SETS PLACES DORMITORIES 

24,419,000 4,100,000 900,000 

Auto figure above is for spring 1952. It was updated from 
I January figure by adding number of sets installed since. 
Car radios more than doubled between '48 and '52, continue 
rise at two million-plus annual rate. Over 75 c 't of U. S. 
cars have radio, with the figures much higher in some markets. 



SOURCE: Advertest Research study in New York metro- 
politan-area homes, February 1952 

Yiiihiht of portable radios in home 



HOMES 
INTERVIEWED 


TOTAL RADIO- 
HOMES HOMES 


RADIO-TV 
HOMES 


1,036 317 


707 


Total of homes with 22 3% 16 1% 
portable radios 


25.5% 


Homes with one portable 
radio 


18.7% 


14.2% 
1.9% 


21.1% 
4.4% 


Homes wilth two or more 
portable radios 


3.6% 


Average number of port- 
able radios per home 


0.27 


0.18 


0.31 



Though limited to New York area, data above indicate extent 
to which portable radios have become standard equipment in 
metropolitan homes. More than one out of five have such 
sets. TV homes have more portables than radio-only homes. 
Over one-quarter of television homes own portable radios. 



5. How much does the out-of-home audience add to [n-home listening? 



SOURCE: Pulse out-of-home listening study January 1952 (except New York which is February 1952) 



City 



Average quarter-hour sets-in- 

use of "in-home" radio 

listening 



Philadelphia 18.3 

New York 21.3 

Boston 21.5 

Detroit 20.2 

Washington 21.3 

Atlanta 21.2 

Cincinnati 19.6 

Minneapolis-St. Paul 22.9 

Chicago 20.7 

Birmingham 24.4 

St. Louis 20.3 

Seattle .... 25.0 







™,.J 



•— 



^ 






Average quarter-hour sets-in- 

use of "out-of-home" radio 

listening 



3.3 
3.5 
3.3 
3.0 
3.1 
3.1 
2.6 
2.9 
2.6 
3.0 
2.4 
2.6 



~_~ 



i 



% of listening added by 
out-of-home 



18.0% 
16.4% 
15.4% 
14.9% 
14.6% 
14.6% 
13.3% 
12.7% 
12.5% 
12.3% 
11.8% 
10.4% 



Out-of-home bigger plus note titan year ago. Pulse ftmf.v 



Out-of-home listening added I5 r j to the winter-spring radio audience 
in 12 markets. This represented a "plus" to sponsors ranging from 
18% in Philadelphia to 10.4% in Seattle. Philadelphia, Pulse points 
out, has consistently ranked first in terms of percent added by out- 
of-home listening in surveys it has conducted over the past two 
years. Out-of-home represented a bigger plus in the winter of 1952 
than in the previous year. Pulse figure for 1951 (in seven of the 
above 12 markets) was 13.7% added by out-of-home. In these same 



seven markets in 1952, out-of-home plus was 15. 2*7. Out-of-home 
listening, now checked continuously by Pulse, is higher in summer 
than in the winter figures shown here. (Figures on the next page 
show how much out-of-home can add to ratings of specific shows in 
summer time.) Since Pulse conducted study above, over 350,000 
portable radios were purchased in the U. S. Car radios, however, 
account for bulk (over 55 f r ) of out-of-home listening. Other places 
where out-of-home listening occurs include beaches, taverns, factories. 



14 JULY 1952 



101 



6. How much does out-of-home listening add to ratings of individual shows? 





^r of rati 


ng out-of-home represents 


Shows 


N. Y. 


St. Louis 


LA. 


Arthur Godfrey 

(daytime) 


7.5% 


9.5% 


25.0% 


Big Sister 


3.5% 


5.5% 


5.5% 


Telephone Hour 


4.9% 


5.3% 


4.8% 


Big Story 


3.3% 


4.9% 


1.4% 


Grand Central 


6.1% 


10.0% 


13.5% 


SOURCE: Pulse, Inc 


, July-August 


I95I ratings 



Out-of-home listening contributes 
6* to 7% of summertime ratings 

For all summertime shows, 6 to 7% of the "true" rating 
(out-of-home plus in-home) is made up of out-of-home 
listening. Sometimes the figure is much higher. Take the 
Arthur Godfrey morning show on CBS, shown in Pulse 
chart at left. Last summer in Los Angeles, Godfrey was 
heard between 7:00 and 8:00 a.m. In this auto-minded 
market, where nearly nine of 10 cars are radio-equipped, 
people driving to work and other out-of-home listeners 
represented at least 25% of the show's rating in the 
market. This is an extreme case but it indicates how im- 
portant out-of-home listening can be. Listening in cars 
is a particularly big factor for news and d.j. shows slotted 
in the hours when people drive to and from work. 



7. How does radio's circulation compare with other media? 

SOURCE: Total U. S. radio homes figure from I January 1952 Joint Radio Network Committee report: CBS Radio Network figure from 
CBSResearch, based on updated BMB Study No. 2, as of Jan. 1952; NBC TV figure from NBC Research, based on ARB study Jan. 1952 
(homes viewing one program per wk.); Magazine figures are Jan. 1952 figures from Audit Bureau of Circulation 

MEDIUM CIRCULATION % OF U. S. 

All U. S. radio homes _ 42,800,000 homes 96.0 

CBS Radio Network 33,260,000 74.5 

NBC Television Network 15,500,000 34.6 

Saturday Evening Post 3,998,616 9.0 

Life 5,296,656 12.0 

This Week 10,006,564 22.0 



8. How many homes are reached by the average program (in four weeks)? 



SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen, November-December 1951 




AVERAGE DAYTIME AUDIENCE (CUMULATIVE) 

Average five-times-a-week daytime network radio show (15 
minutes) reached 8,474,000 homes one or more times during 
four weeks of November-December 1951. 




AVERAGE NIGHTTIME AUDIENCE (CUMULATIVE) 

Average once-a-week 25 minutes or more evening 
net radio shows (excluding children's and fight pro- 
grams) reached 7,584,000 homes. 



102 



SPONSOR 



KXEL 



roved 



IOWA 



^_X$ r 1/ lore ^Jhan 



Tall Corn 



a/ii 



Des Moines 



1942-Leadership-1952 

Twenty-two County Study of Listening 
Habits — 1952 Conlon 



rnina 

KXEL 28.4 

Des Moines (NBC) 17.8 

Cedar Rapids (CBS) 19.6 

Waterloo (Mutual) 2.8 



ernoon. 



KXEL 27.3 

Des Moines (NBC). 22.0 

Cedar Rapids (CBS) 20.0 

Waterloo (Mutual) 2.8 



C^uenina 

KXEL 26.3 

Des Moines (NBC) 24.4 

Cedar Rapids (CBS) 22.9 

Waterloo (Mutual) 1.8 



Here is the unvarnished truth. You are not getting your 
money's worth of listeners, if you are trying to cover North- 
east Iowa, without KXEL. 

Get the complete facts on Northeast Iowa's listening habits. 
Call your Avery-Knodel man or write direct to KXEL. 



KXEL 50,000 Watts ABC 

JOSH HICCINS BROADCASTING COMPANY 
WATERLOO, IOWA 

Represented by Avery-Knodel, Inc. 

ABC OUTLET FOR CEDAR RAPIDS AND 

WATERLOO, IOWA 



14 JULY 1952 



103 



1. How does listening differ hour by hour? 



SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen, March 1952 
' i of homes 



24 

11 

20 

18 

16 

14 

12 

10 

8 

6 

4 

2 





\iiin(x»r of I . V radio homes using radio by hours of day (March 1952) 

Add 000 to figures for homes reached in bars below; includes radio-TV and radio-only homes 

10,186 

-19,801 



8,646^ 



9,416 



9,801 



7,618 



6,720 

— —— 






4,451 



1,455 



8 ' 646 R 432 8 ' 774 

7,747,1^ 



9,930 



'-'"i 



6a.m. 7 8 9 10 11 12 1p.m. 2 3 4 5 6 7 



7,490 



4,794 



L_„ 



9 10 11 12 



2. How many hours do homes listen per day? 



SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen, April 1951-March 1952 



3.65 

'; '■ ■ ■■■ — ' — ' 









I r «•!•«««• total hours radio is used per home per day in all I . S. radio homes 

Includes radio-TV and radio-only homes, April 1951 through March 1952 

3.66 
3.56 
< 3.31 
3.17 



2.95 



3.02 






2.71 



2.68 



3.54 



: ■ ■ • ■ ; .vv--.v-.--J 



3.40 



3.41 



1 .1 



APRIL MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC. JAN. FEB. MARCH 

1951 1952 



104 



SPONSOR 




r/Aff 



Mm 







-jim § 

5:00 to 8:30 AM 



DAILY 



WH 





Memphis, Tenn. 



WEED & CO. Representativej 



14 JULY 1952 



105 




In the Chicago Market*. . . 




IS THE BIGGEST MEDIUM... 

■* ^mW mm mm HI WOmmM - WmmW Mi ^BrW ^mWm mmmm ^m* m* Wm m mm WmMmt Wmmm WW ^fmW IB T W m» w* mt 



TOTAL 
HOMES 




RADIO 
HOMES 



CHICAGO 
DAILY 

NEWSPAPER 
HOMES 



CHICAGO 

TELEVISION 

HOMES 




m 






/H s\{ /% 



<Y 



A 



/ 






TTfT TFTT J\V 





□ x ^WmmmWmm^ 'Wm 
O I 



Audience data from Pulse of Chicago, March-April 1952 

Homes estimate from Sales Management. May 1952 

Radio homes estimate from Sales Management, May 1952 

and 8MB 1949 % radio ownership 

Newspaper estimate bases' on latest Chicago newspaper 

data available 

Television estimate from Teiepulse, May 1952 

ft! counties in Illinois, Indiana, fowa, Michigan and 
Wisconsin (WBBM 50-100% day and night BMB area, 1949) 





urn ^ 




1,029,010 



Eath figure— 500,000 homes) 



2,969,000 



2,908,600 



1,879,871 



In Chicago . . , your best buy 




STATION B 

share 

of audience 



STATION C 

share 

of audience 



STATION D 

share 

of audience 



WBBM 



HAS THE BIGGEST AUDIENCE! 



^/ifii A Ht ^ 






/' | / V 



-D 



■^ -Z- 



/•/ 



• < 



^•z- 




•i 




• • §»■ t 




. K* ^-z* ^ 

^ \^ V> v > 




27.7 



i£.7 



U4 



10.0 



(Each figure— 2.5% Share of Audience) 




Chicago's Show manship Station 
50,000 watts -Represented by CBS Radio Spot Sales 






Amount 

radio-TV 

homes 

contribute 



Amount 

radio-only 

homes 

contribute 



3. How does current listening compare with a year ago by hours of the day? 

SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen, 1951-52 

% of all homes using radio, showing portion radio-TV and radio-only homes eontrlbute 

27.0 



hom A e '! 24.0% 



25.5 



26.0 





21.6 


1 







"~ 


23.5 









21.6 





20.6 









20.8 



- ™— 





18.8 









22.2 









21.4 







MARCH 


1951 1952 


1951 1952 


1951 1952 


1951 1952 


1951 1952 


1951 1952 




10 A.M.-I2 NOON 


12 NOON-2 P.M. 


2-4 P.M. 


4-6 P.M. 


6-8 P.M. 


8-11 P.M. 




M.-F. 


M.-F. 


M.-F. 


M.-F. 


M.-F. 


ALL EVES. 



littoHtif of 1952 listening drop varies with time of day 



Homes using radio are down for the month of March 1952 compared 
with the same month in 1951 (figure on top of bars). But the amount 
of drop-off varies considerably with the time of day. The drop is 
2.4 percentage points for the 10 a.m. to 12 noon period but it 
mounts to 5.6 points in the evening hours of 8 to II p.m. Most stable 
period is between 2 and 6 p.m. when the drop is only one point be- 
tween 2 and 4 p.m. and two points between 4 and 6 p.m. Through 



the course of the day in both 1951 and 1952 the amount of listening 
contributed by radio-TV homes (white portion of bar) decreases 
steadily. Between 10 a.m. and 12 noon in 1952, radio-TV homes 
contributed about one-third to the all-homes-using-radios figure; the 
8-11 p.m. figure shrinks to under one-tenth contributed. In other 
words TV set owners listen more in the mornings. (It is this one fact 
which has created a buying rush on morning radio availabilities.) 



4. How does listening vary with the season (19484950 percent homes using radios)? 



% homes 
using radios 



Nighttime 6 p.m. -12 mid. 



Daytime 6 a.m. -6 pm. 




108 



JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUN.JUL. AUG. SEP. OCT. NOV. DEC. JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUN.JUL. AUG. SEP. OCT. NOV. DEC. J 
1948 1949 

SPONSOR 



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WHAM PERSONALITIES 

All with HIGH Pulse Ratings 

All at LOW COST Per 1000 Listeners 




Telle 
Test 




These WHAM personalities and par- 
ticipating programs have made envi- 
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of radio and personal friends who have confidence 
in the products they sell. They gain quick accept- 
ance for new products and keep up the sales volume 
of time-tested items. 

When spot advertisers compare the cost per thou- 
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understand why WHAM contract renewals are out- 
of-the-ordinary. 

RIGHT SPOTS TO TAP A BIG MARKET 

station — WHAM— that is lis- 
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in these 16 Counties 99.3% of 
the time (Pulse Report) — not 
to mention 7 additional BMB 
Counties not included in Pulse. 




WHAM's Radio Personalities 
constantly sell 350,100 radio 
families in the station's 16- 
County primary area in West- 
ern New York. When you are 
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MORT 
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Man 



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Cinderella 
Weekend 




ROSS 
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Farm News 
Country Fare 





Home- 
town 




GEORGE HAEFNER 




ANN and 
BOB KEEFE 




HI m Mi IB til ui UiuTii ; bbT 



The STROMBERG-CARLSON Station 
Rochester, N. Y. 

Basic NBC — 50,000 watts 
clear channel — 1180 kc 



GEORGE P. HOLLINGBERY COMPANY, National Representative 



3. How does listening compare with a year ago? continued from top pag e ios 



SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen, 1951-52 

% of homes it.viiio radio in all V. S. radio homes, in radio-only, and in radio-TV homes 



All 



Radic 

TV 
homes l 

homes 
using 

radios _® - 5 onl Y 
"1 homes 



Radio- 



24.0% ' 



24.0 



! 


i 
i 
i 


22~3 


21.6 


t 




17.8 



A.M.-I2 NOON 
M.-F. 



27.4 



25.5 


22.7 


26.6 


23.5 




r 




17.3 



NOON-2 
M.-F. 



P.M. 



March 1951 
March 1952 



34.5 



31.7 



24.9 



21.6 

i 




23.7 


20.6 




16.5 




13.7 





23.5 


20.8 




23.4 


18.8 




14.1 




11.5 



2-4 P.M. 
M.-F. 



Listening is tip itt rutlio-only homes thirina daytime 



26.0 




30.2 


22.2 




12.0 




9.4 



27.0 



21.4 



8.5 



4.8 



31.8 



4-6 P.M. 


6-8 P.M. 


8-11 P.M. 


M.-F. 


M.-F. 


ALL EVES 



Following the solid bar lines across the chart above shows you 
that listening is up from 10 a.m. through 4 p.m. in radio-only homes. 
But in radio-TV homes the reverse is true and listening declines are 
considerable. It is this sharp drop-off which accounts for the decline 
in the all-U.S.-homes-using-radios daytime figures. The increase in 
radio use in radio-only homes is not enough to counterbalance the 
radio-TV homes decline. Take the 10 a.m. through 12 noon period 



as an example. Here use of radios in radio-only homes went up 
from 22.3% in 1951 to 24.0% in 1952. Meanwhile, however, the 
use of radios in radio-TV homes declined from 28.2% in 1951 to 
17.8% in 1952. The result of combining these two figures, properly 
weighted for the number of homes they represent, is 21.6% of all 
U.S. radio homes using radio during the 10-to-noon period. Further 
study of the chart above will reveal some interesting variations. 



4. How does listening vary with the season (1950-1952)? c °«^»^h boiiom v a &* 108 



Nighttime 6 p.m. -12 mid. 



Daytime 6 a.m. -6 pm. 



% homes 
using radios 



*« 


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^ 


■». 


\ 


s 






^0* 


*#•< 


y 


.** 


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*mm> 


■ »« 


**- 












N 


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30 



20 



10 



FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUN.JUL AUG. SEP. OCT. NOV. DEC. JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUN. JUL. AUG. SEP. OCT. NOV. DEC. JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. 
I950 I95I I952 



110 



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EDWARD PETRY & CO. 
National Representatives 



.5 MV/M Primary Area WFAA-820 WFAA-570 

Square Miles 116,000 95,214 

Radio Homes 1,143,500 964,000 

Population 4,508,906 3,829,547 

Families 1,374,422 1,148,449 

Retail Sales $4,486,037,240 $3,817,735,610 

Effective Buying Income $5,401,326,660 $5,081,706,385 

Buying Income per Family $3,930 $4,425 

SOURCE SALES MANAGEMENT, MAY >0, 1952 



NBC-ABC-TQN Affi 

5 K W 

WFAA-820 

DAL 

Radio Service of The Dallas Morning News 





14 JULY 1952 



111 



5. How do ratings of radio program types vary with the season? 







ONCE-A-WEEK EVENING 25 MINUTES OR LONGER 
















{Rating 


is figure at left; at right is number of shows c 


/ the type.) 










Nielsen 
rating periods 


Situation 
Comedy 


Genera 
Dram; 


1 


Mystery 
Drama 


Concert 
Music 


Popular 
Music 


Variety 
Music 


1 


Variety 
Comedy 


Quiz 
Aud. 


& 
Par. 


1951 

1 JAN 


10.9 


16 


10.7 


8 


9.4 18 


6.2 


6 


6.8 


4 


10.6 


6 


11.8 


7 


9.7 


7 


2 


11.3 


16 


11.5 


8 


10.1 18 


7.2 


6 


7.9 


4 


9.7 


7 


11.5 


7 


10.5 


7 


1 Feb 


11.4 


16 


11.7 


8 


10.3 18 


6.7 


7 


7.0 


4 


10.2 


7 


11.5 


7 


10.0 


6 


2 


10.2 


17 


10.2 


8 


9.5 18 


6.0 


7 


6.1 


4 


9.3 


7 


11.1 


7 


8.7 


7 


1 MAR 


10.3 


16 


10.4 


8 


9.1 18 


6.5 


6 


7.1 


3 


9.5 


6 


10.9 


6 


8.9 


6 


2 


10.4 


14 


9.7 


9 


8.2 18 


6.3 


6 


8.3 


3 


8.8 


6 


10.2 


6 


7.9 


5 


1 APR 


9.8 


15 


9.2 


9 


8.5 19 


5.6 


7 


7.9 


3 


8.7 


6 


10.3 


6 


8.1 


5 


2 


8.9 


15 


9.0 


9 


8.1 19 


5.6 


7 


7.6 


3 


8.1 


6 


9.1 


6 


8.0 


5 


1 MAY 


8.0 


15 


7.8 


9 


7.1 20 


5.3 


8 


6.7 


3 


7.0 


6 


8.7 


6 


5.9 


4 


2 


6.8 


14 


7.5 


8 


6.3 19 


4.6 


6 


5.8 


3 


6.2 


6 


7.6 


5 


6.0 


6 


1 JUNE 


7.0 


13 


7.4 


6 


6.0 21 


4.4 


7 


5.3 


4 


6.0 


6 


8.2 


5 


6.3 


4 


2 


5.4 


10 


6.6 


5 


5.2 21 


3.2 


8 


4.7 


6 


4.8 


6 


4.4 


4 


6.0 


3 


1 JULY 


5.4 


5 


5.2 


6 


4.9 14 


4.5 


5 


4.7 


6 


4.4 


5 


3.8 


2 


4.7 


1 


2 


4.5 


1 


5.6 


5 


4.7 15 


4.3 


4 


4.7 


5 


4.4 


5 


3.0 


2 


4.8 


1 


1 AUG 


5.4 


1 


5.3 


4 


5.1 14 


3.6 


6 


4.1 


4 


4.9 


5 


3.8 


2 


no sr 


lows 


2 


4.6 


1 


6.0 


5 


5.4 11 


4.5 


5 


4.1 


4 


5.1 


5 


4.3 


2 


no si 


lows 


1 SEP 


6.5 


4 


6.8 


7 


6.6 9 


4.0 


7 


5.2 


4 


5.7 


5 


5.8 


2 


7.0 


1 


2 


6.2 


3 


7.4 


8 


6.9 12 


4.8 


7 


6.2 


3 


6.7 


5 


6.2 


3 


6.9 


1 


1 OCT 


8.6 


10 


7.8 


10 


7.2 13 


7.1 


5 


6.5 


3 


7.8 


7 


8.7 


6 


8.6 


3 


2 


9.3 


10 


8.1 


10 


8.3 13 


6.0 


6 


7.8 


3 


8.1 


6 


8.2 


6 


10.6 


3 


1 NOV 


9.5 


11 


8.9 


10 


8.3 12 


6.0 


6 


7.4 


3 


8.7 


5 


9.0 


6 


11.2 


3 


2 


8.9 


11 


7.4 


10 


7.5 12 


6.3 


6 


6.8 


3 


7.6 


6 


8.1 


6 


10.5 


3 


1 DEC 


9.1 


10 


8.2 


10 


7.9 16 


6.2 


6 


7.1 


3 


8.3 


6 


7.9 


6 


8.7 


4 


2 


9.9 


10 


8.5 


10 


8.4 12 


6.5 


5 


7.1 


3 


8.3 


6 


8.7 


6 


11.5 


3 


1952 
































1 JAN 


9.8 


10 


9.4 


9 


8.8 13 


6.1 


6 


6.3 


2 


8.2 


4 


8.7 


6 


10.7 


3 


3 


9.6 


10 


8.8 


9 


8.5 13 


6.1 


7 


6.6 


2 


8.2 


4 


8.7 


6 


11.6 


3 


1 FEB 


8.8 


10 


8.5 


9 


8.0 13 


5.8 


6 


6.6 


2 


7.9 


4 


8.3 


6 


10.4 


3 


3 


8.8 


10 


8.4 


9 


7.4 13 


5.9 


6 


6.2 


2 


7.4 


4 


8.0 


7 


10.5 


3 


1 MAR 


9.4 


10 


8.8 


9 


7.9 14 


5.8 


6 


6.5 


2 


7.9 


4 


8.6 


7 


10.9 


3 


3 


8.5 


11 


8.1 


9 


7.5 14 


6.2 


5 


5.6 


2 


7.8 


4 


8.2 


7 


8.9 


3 


1 APR 


7.6 


10 


7.6 


9 


6.5 13 


6.3 


6 


6.6 


2 


7.1 


4 


7.6 


6 


9.4 


3 


SOURCE: A. C. Ni 


elsen AM 


ratings, 1951. Programs evaluated are network si 


lows only. 














112 




























SPONSOR 



t'hart < -oiiiiuin-s on paye III 




WHAT DO YOU SELL? 

Feeds . . . Seeds . . . Farm Equipment . . . Gasoline 
. . . Oil . . . Tires . . . Automotive Equipment . . . 
Foods . . . Drugs . . . Cosmetics . . . Household Ap- 
pliances . . . Soft Drinks . . . Beer . . . Cigarettes . . . 
Confectionery . . . Soap . . . Clothing . . . 

WHATEVER YOU SELL... 

Use WNAX to Do the Job in BIG AGGIE LAND 



Big Aggie Land, 267 BMB counties in Minnesota, the Dakotas, Nebraska, and Iowa, is served 
only by WNAX. In this world's richest agricultural area, 405,210 families listen to WNAX 
. . . 80% of them three to seven times every week. 

Last year retail sales in Big Aggie Land totaled #3,462,941,000 — greater than Los Angeles, 
Detroit or St. Louis.* 

*Compiled from 1952 Sales Management 
Survey of Buying Power 

Yes, the 405,210 families who listen to WNAX are on 
an all-year buying spree. WNAX, and WNAX alone, 
delivers this free-spending Major Market in one big, low- 
cost package. 

On the basis of a one-time Class A chainbreak, 5 cents buys 
1,000 families. #1.00 gets you 20,000 radio homes. So, 
cut your sales cost— BOOST YOUR SALES PROFIT 
in Big Aggie Land with WNAX. Call your Katz man 
today. 

THE MIDWEST ADDRESS OF CBS 





YANKTON - SIOUX CITY 



AFFILIATED WITH THE 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 



14 JULY 1952 



113 



5. How do ratings of radio programs vary with the season? continued from pag e 112 



MULTI-WEEKLY DAYTIME 



iRuting is figure at left: at right is number of 
sluncs of the type.) 



Nielsen 
rating periods 


Adult 
Serials 


Child 
Programs 


Qui: 
Aud. 


: & 
Par. 


1951 

1 JAN 

2 


7.2 
6.9 


25 
25 


6.4 
6.2 


5 
5 


4.9 
5.4 


10 
10 


1 FEB 


7.1 


25 


6.6 


5 


5.0 


10 


2 


7.0 


25 


5.8 


5 


5.0 


10 


1 MAR 


7.4 


23 


5.8 


4 


4.6 


10 


2 


7.1 


24 


5.8 


4 


4.6 


10 


1 APR 


6.8 


11 


5.4 


4 


4.3 


10 


2 


6.4 


24 


4.7 


4 


4.1 


10 


1 MAY 


6.4 


22 


4.0 


4 


4.0 


10 


2 


6.0 


22 


3.9 


4 


3.4 


10 


1 JUNE 

2 


6.4 
5.7 


22 

21 


4.5 
2.8 


2 

1 


3.7 
3.5 


10 1 

8 


1 JULY 


5.0 


21 


no shows 


3.4 


8 


2 


5.3 


20 


no shows 


3.5 


9 


1 AUG 


5.4 


19 


no shows 


3.8 


7 


2 


5.6 


IS 


no shows 


3.7 


7 


1 SEP 


5.5 


21 


4.2 


1 


3.8 


7 


2 


5.8 


22 


4.3 


2 


3.7 


7 


1 OCT 


5.2 


25 


4.5 


3 


3.3 


9 


2 


5.9 


24 


4.9 


3 


3.8 


10 


1 NOV 


6.4 


24 


6.1 


3 


4.2 




2 


5.5 


25 


5.5 


3 


3.8 




1 DEC 


6.0 


25 


6.0 


3 


4.1 




2 


5.9 


26 


6.6 


3 


4.7 




1952 














1 JAN 


6.1 


27 


6.0 


3 


4.3 




3 


6.0 


27 


6.6 


3 


4.5 




1 FEB 


5.9 


27 


5.9 


3 


4.7 




3 


6.1 


27 


6.1 


3 


4.6 




1 MAR 


6.2 


27 


5.6 


3 


4.8 


10 


3 


6.2 


27 


5.7 


3 


4.3 


10 


1 APR 


5.6 


28 


4.6 


2 


4.2 


10 



Hon- to use this chart 

The chart, starting with evening programs on page 112 and 
continuing at left, has many important uses for sponsors. Based on 
national Nielsen ratings for radio, it shows primarily the relative rat- 
ing behavior of any major radio show type, in comparison with other 
program types and with itself, over a period of more than a year. 

Reading the chart downward under any given show type, such as 
"Situation Comedy," will show the prospective buyer or current spon- 
sor how the average rating of all such shows on the air vary with the 
season during any Nielsen rating period. For example, daytime soap 
operas hold about 70% of their audience in the summertime; night- 
time variety-comedy shows take a summertime beating, and hold 
only 25% of their audiences. (This is indicative as well of the qual- 
ity of the reduced number of summertime comedy shows, as well as 
tastes and listening loyalties.) 

With this chart, sponsors can weigh the ratings for their own 
shows against rating averages for similar shows, and can judge 
roughly the year-'round audience potential of several basic types of 
network (and local, too) programs. Also, they can judge which 
categories are represented most strongly on a year-'round basis by 
the sheer weight of numbers, and can make month-by-month com- 
parisons of averages and numbers. 

Other trends are evident, such as the fact that mystery shows and 
daytime serials hold their audiences fairly well during the summer, 
while other types slack off. Also, the trends in the types of shows 
that take off for the summer months can be charted. (Example: 
situation comedies dropped from a winter peak of 16 to one show 
during last summer, but mysteries only lost about half of their ranks.) 



114 



SPONSOR 




COVERAGE 

5000 wafts (full time) 
on 630 kc, blanketing 
NEW ENGLAND'S SEC- 
OND LARGEST MARKET, 
and also covering the 
rich Fall River-New 
Bedford, Mass-, mar- 
keting area with a sig- 
nal greater than 2 mv. 



AUDIENCE 

An active audience, 
loyal to a BALANCED* 
schedule of TOP-RATED 
CBS and local programs 
—programs designed 
for PRIMARY listening 
attention. Important 
because— listeners who 
really LISTEN, are buy- 
ers who really BUY! 




more 



New Englanders 
listen to WPRO 
than any other 



Rhode Island 



station. 



to reach the 
most buyers, 



BUYBASIC..| CBS | 



WPRO 



PROVIDENCE - 630 KC • 5000 W 



AM 
& FM 



REPRESENTED BY RAYMER 



6. How do program types compare in number of homes reached? 



SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen, 3-9 February 1952 



Average number of homes reaehetl by program types, 3-9 February li)52 

Once-a-week evening (25 minutes or more duration) 



SITUATION 
COMEDY 

GENERAL 
DRAMA 

MYSTERY 
DRAMA 

CONCERT 
MUSIC 

POPULAR 
MUSIC 

VARIETY 
MUSIC 

VARIETY 
COMEDY 

QUIZ & AUD. 
PARTIC. 



3,766,000 homes 
(8.8 rating) 

3,638,000 homes 
(8.5 rating) 




4,451,000 homes 
(10.4 rating) 



Multi-weekly daytime 



ADULT 
SERIALS 

CHILD 
PROGRAMS 

QUIZ & AUD. 
PARTIC. 




2,525,000 homes 
(5.9 rating) 

2,525,000 homes 
(5.9 rating) 



2,012,000 homes 
(4.7 rating) 



7. How many homes were reached by the top 10 radio shows last season? 



SOURCE: A. C. Nielsan report for two weeks ending 9 February 1952 



1. 

2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 
9. 
10. 



116 



Show No. of homes 

Lux Radio Theatre 6,720,000 

Jack Benny 6,420,000 

Amos V Andy 6,120,000 

Bergen McCarthy 5,906,000 

You Bet Your Life 5,307,000 

Talent Scouts 4,922,000 

Suspense 4,922,000 

People Are Funny 4,665,000 

Our Miss Brooks 4,580,000 

The Big Story 4,451,000 



§ii| 



SI: 
I: 



Lux leads, but gap is narrow 

In this peak-of-season Nielsen report, "Lux Radio 
Theatre" continued in its usual top spot as radio's 
highest-rated show nationally. Although its lead was 
not large (300,000 homes) over the number 2 show, 
"Lux" did considerably better than the average for its 
show type. Note too that there is a tie for the number 
6 spot, indicative of how close the gap has become 
between the first and tenth shows in radio. What still 
counts is not mere supremacy, but cost-per- 1 ,000 and 
ability of the program to sell to its audience. 



SPONSOR 






Ml* 



. . oh* *« B *°"? 




port 



•» -JgfiS» ' 



>N* 



HERE'S WHERE THEY'RE BITING! 

We won't drown you in figures. We'll just 
point out that for the calendar year 1951, 
naval installations alone in the Hampton 
Roads area paid 42,000 employees #155,- 
000,000. That's a lot of buying power — and 
it's still growing. But it's only a small frac- 
tion of the tremendous total in defense rich, 
14 JULY 1952 



shipping-and-industry-rich Hampton Roads. 
Norfolk's WCAV, most powerful indepen- 
dent station in Tidewater, baits your hook 
with programs and personalities that land this 
big market smack in your lap. 

VwC/VV 850 0N THE DIAL 

NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 

117 



How does network radio compare with oilier media in people per dollar? 



SOURCE: CBS film "More Than Meets the Eye.'' For explanation of how figures are deriv-ed, see below 

MEDIA PEOPLE PER DOLLAR 



Radio 934 

Television .___ 365 

Magazines 334 

Newspapers 240 



..::y: : :vX : : : ::::::::xXv: : :: : : : x::S::: : : : : : : : : : : : S:vx:¥: : : : : : : : . 



: : : : : : : : :¥^^::•^:^^X:::.:•^::;::■::X:::X : :': : :■:■:.:■:. : :::;^ : ^: : : : :.:-:■::;:;^:v 



Siow i'igurex were derived 

Network radio's cost is based on Nielsen Radio Index data on all 
sponsored programs for which information is available, for the period 
October 1951 to January 1952 (1st report). Number of listeners 
per set is from nation-wide American Research Bureau study, Feb- 
ruary 1951. 

Magazine cost is for the average full-page black-and-white ad in 
eight leading publications (Life, Look, Collier's, Saturday Evening 
Post, Ladies' Home Journal, Woman's Home Companion, McCall's, 
Good Housekeeping). Circulation from ABC as of June 30, 1951. 
Readers per copy from Magazine Audience Group Study, 1949. 
Percent of ad noters from Starch data, July 1950-June 1951. Page 
costs are figured on the one-time rate in effect in January 1952. 



Network television's cost is based on approximately two-thirds of 
all sponsored television programs (all available) for the month of 
February 1952. Number of viewers from the American Research 
Bureau. Cost of time: PIB gross time cost as of January 1952, net 
time cost estimated at 75 f r of gross. Cost of programs: Variety. 

Newspaper cost is based on an average 500-line ad in the largest 
morning and evening newspapers in 50 largest U. S. cities. Circula- 
tion, ABC as of September 30. 1951. Readers per copy estimated 
at 2.5 Percent of ad noters, from Continuing Study of Newspaper 
Reading, Nos. 1-125. Space costs are based on the flat line, one- 
time rate in effect March 1952. 



nmtmmm 



2. What's the cost-per-1,000 homes of network programs by types? 



SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen, 3-9 February 1952 



Once-a-week evening (25 minutes or more duration) 



SITUATION 
COMEDY 

GENERAL 
DRAMA 

MYSTERY 
DRAMA 

CONCERT 
MUSIC 

POPULAR 
MUSIC 

VARIETY 
MUSIC 

VARIETY 
COMEDY 

QUIZ & AUD. 
PARTIC. 




$8.85 



$8.95 



Multi-weekly daytime 



ADULT 
SERIAL 

CHILD 

PROGRAMS 

QUIZ & AUD. 
PARTIC. 




$2.88 



Note: In contrast to chart one above, (based on "people") chart 
two is based on "houses" — and there are more than three people 
per home. Further, two of the lowest cost nighttime categories 
(news and sports) are not shown in this Nielsen breakdown. 



118 



SPONSOR 



THE PROGRAM 
THAT . . . . 



Starring 



Tyrone 

W AMERICA'S FA 




AVORITE SON!! 



gUttfe*" ■-■ 



>v#> 



His faith in America gave 
America faith in hir 






■^ TK2' 









• TYRONE POWER *EDWIN C. HILL 

As Senator Dean Edwards Adding Authenticity 

He put Old Glory above He humanizes the Why and 

his personal glory! How of government! 



W MUSI 




/OR loCAL 
SP °^SORs I 




Wf Wjf-fti jr K 





OF THE U. S. SENATE 
AT WORK! 



$%> 



SUCH A DRIVING, PULSING, 
FEVER-PITCH OF EXCITEMENT ABOUT 

'What goes on in Washington?" 



.^K, 



%u'^T 



rr 



<g* 



m 



3. What are some typical talent-production costs for radio shows? 

SOURCE: SPONSOR June 1952 estimates 






SITUATION COMEDY 

Amos V Andy $15,000 
Our Miss Brooks 7,500 
Life with Luigi 6,000 

My Friend Irma 6,000 

M YSTERY- CRIME DRAMA 

Suspense $ 7,000 

Big Town 4,500 

Martin Kane 4,500 

Mystery Theatre 4,000 
FBI in War, Peace 3,975 



Dragnet $3,500 

Barry Craig 2,750 

GENERAL DRA MA 

Philip Morris 

Playhouse $10,000 

Dr. Christian 7,000 

Big Story 6,500 

Armstrong Theatre 4,000 

AUDIEN CE PARTICIPATION 

You Bet Your Life $16,500 
(For both radio and TV) 



Cive and Take 



QUIZ PANEL 



52,250 



VARIETY COMEDY 



What's My Line $6,000 



CONCERT MUSIC 

Voice of Firestone $18,000 
(For both radio and TV) 

Telephone Hour 12,500 

Railroad Hour 11,000 

Band of America 7,000 



4. What 7 s the average cost of spot radio 

SOURCE: NARTSR study of 93 radio stations, 1951 

AVERAGE COST OF TIME (CROSS) 

Class A, one hour $163.63 

Class A, half hour 97.14 

Class A, quarter hour 63.02 

11 
Class A, one minute 22.14 



Jack Benny 


$18,000 


Fibber McCee & 
Molly 


12,500 


VARIETY MUSIC 




Bing Crosby 


$20,000 


POPULAR MUSIC 




Hit Parade 


$9,000 


Mario Lanza 


8,000 


Guy Lombardo 


5,500 


Sammy Kaye Sere 
nade 


4,500 


time period? 





For "tablecloth" estimates only 

The figures at left are useful for quick estimates only. 
They could be used to give a tentative, tablecloth an- 
swer to a question like this: "How much would a cam- 
paign of 1,000 60-second announcements cost?" An- 
swer: $22,140, a useful but merely tentative figure. 



5. How do spot radio costs compare now with 1941? 

SOURCE: NARTSR study of 93 radio stations, 1941 vs. 1951 



NARTSR 10-year cost comparison 

Average cost basis, derived from rates jor 
Class A hour, hall-hour, 15-minutes, {-min- 
ute l 93 stations 1 


7947 

100 


7957 

120 


Cost-per-1,000 basis, calculated from na- 
tional sets-in-use figures 


100 


74 


Cost-per-1,000 basis, calculated from num- 
ber of U. S. radio families 

(Base: 1941 = 700; 


100 


88 



Cost-por- 1,000 down 

While the rates charged for spot time by 
radio stations have gone up 20 r r in the 
decade between 1941 and 1951, cost-per- 
1,000 has declined. The cost-per-1,000 de- 
cline is 26% whn it is calculated on the 
basis of national sets-in-use. It is 22% 
when costs are measured against radio fam- 
ilies. Reason for the decline is the increase 
in sets-in-use and radio families since 1941 
which more than offsets the 20% average 
rate increase by U. S. stations since 1941. 



122 



SPONSOR 



millions listen 



{'.-:■■■/ * 




/'••*•■ 




• • 



-•jf^/ millions buy! 



?/ 



WJR MARKET DATA 

(primary coverage area) 

Per cent 

of Total 

U. S. Market 

Population .: 12,601,300 8.3% 

Radio Homes 3,785,540 8.6% 

Passenger Car Registrations.. 4,116,934 10.2% 

F/7//ng Sfafton Sales $739,614,000 10.1% 



This summer 4,500,000 vacationists will visit 
Michigan . . . most of them by automobile. Com- 
hine this with over 4 million passenger car 
registrations already within the range of W J K"s 
signal, and you're looking at the greatest 
filling station sales potential in the Midwest! 
Sell these millions of customers, with the only 
single medium that reaches them all. That's 
WJR, the Great Voice of the Great Lakes! 




illl 

i 4 





the GREAT VOICE 

of the 

GREAT LAKES 




V> JK Delro.l 

The Goodwill Sli 



CBS Radio 
Network 



Radio — America's Greatest Advertising Medium 



<*§ 



Represented Nationally by the Henry I. Chr'ntal Co. 
V/JR— Fisher Bldg., Detroit 2, Mich. 
Mil* WJR Foifern Office. 665 Fifth Avenue. New Vor* 17, N. Y. 
MIKE 




14 JULY 1952 



123 



1. How much money gross, has been spent to buy network time 48—52? 



:OURCE: Publisher's Information Bureau 







1952 

FIRST 5 

MONTHS 

t 

$25,036,805 


+ OR - 
FROM 1951 

- 24.0% 


I95I 
TOTAL 

$68,784,773 


1950 

$70,744,669 


1949 

$63,403,583 


1948 

$62,265,105 


20,475,920 -18.9 


54,324,017 


61,397,650 


64,013,296 


69,697,590 


16,402,402 


+ 11.8 


33,708,846 


35,124,624 


42,342,854 


44,304,245 


8,628,653 


+ 12.5 


17,900,958 


16,091,977 


18,040,596 


22,728,802 



YEARLY TOTALS 



[193QJ $27,694,090 l^JZ] $115,404,803 IJ949J $187,800,329 

J2935J $49,293,901 (JHT] $190,930,336 [1950] $ 183 ' 358 ' 92 

IWH)] $96,455,603 (JHB\ $198,995,742 [±95l] $174,718,594 



2. How much money was spent to buy spot radio time? 



SOURCE: SPONSOR estimates 



120 



90 



60 



30 




1947 1948 

$90 million $100 million 



1949 
$108 million 



1950 
$120 million 



1951 
$132 million 



1952 
$139 million 

(estimated) 



120 
90 
60 
30 



124 



SPONSOR 



NEW YORK 



BOSTON 



CHICAGO 



wQed & company 







— "*^BI Bflf | 1 - * 



RADIO STATIO 



EPRESENTATI VES 



DETROIT 



SAN FRANCISCO 



ATLANTA 



HOLLYWOOD 




1. How do radio only and radio TV homes compare in the 63 TV market? 

SOURCE: NBC Radio Research Department, I May 1952 
TOP 2 TV MARKETS NEXT 5 TV MARKETS NEXT 14 TV MARKETS NEXT 43 TV MARKETS RADIO-ONLY AREA 



4,155,000 

RADIO-TV HOMES 

(24% OF TV HOMES 

IN THE U.S.) 

1.673.000 

RADIO-ONLY HOMES 


4,373,000 

TV HOMES 

(25% OF TV HOMES 

IN THE U.S.) 

1,692.000 

RADIO-ONLY HOMES 


4.321.000 

TV HOMES 

(25% OF TV HOMES 

IN THE U.S.) 

2.541.000 

RADIO-ONLY HOMES 


4,442.000 

TV HOMES 

(26% OF TV HOMES 

IW THE U.S.) 

4,789.000 

RADIO-ONLY HOMES 


14,814,000 

RADIO-ONLY 

HOMES, NON-TV 

AREAS 

35% 
OF ALL U.S. HOMES 



Radio-only homes in TV areas, 1 May, 1952 



TV MARKET 



Top 2 



NEW YORK 
LOS ANGELES 



RANK 



CHICAGO 


.". 


PHILADELPHIA 


i 


NPXl R BOSTON 
I1CAI J DETROIT 


5 

n 


CLEVELAND 


7 


PITTSBURGH 


8 


ST. LOUIS 


9 


BALTIMORE 


1(> 


SAN FRANCISCO 


1 I 


WASHINGTON 


12 


MILWAUKEE 


13 


MOYt 1A CINCINNATI 
UGAI It MINN. -ST. PAUL 


14 

l.i 


NEW HAVEN 


Id 


BUFFALO 


17 


INDIANAPOLIS 


18 


PROVIDENCE 


19 


COLUMBUS 


20 


SCHENECTADY 


21 


KANSAS CITY 


22 


DAYTON 


23 


TOLEDO 


24 


ATLANTA 


25 


DALLAS-FT WORTH 


26 


SYRACUSE 


27 


JOHNSTOWN 


28 


LANCASTER 


29 


ROCHESTER 


30 


SEATTLE 


31 


CHARLOTTE 


32 


HOUSTON 


33 


LOUISVILLE 


34 


MEMPHIS 


35 


OMAHA 


36 


RICHMOND 


37 


SAN DIEGO 


38 


NORFOLK 


39 


DAVENPORT 


40 


BIRMINGHAM 


41 


Next 43 n™ 1 ™™ 


42 

43 


NEW ORLEANS 


44 


OKLAHOMA CITY 


45 


GRAND RAPIDS 


46 


MIAMI 


47 


AMES 


48 


GREENSBORO 


49 


ERIE 


50 


HUNTINGTON 


51 


KALAMAZOO 


52 


TULSA 


53 


SAN ANTONIO 


54 


SALT LAKE CITY 


55 


UTICA 


56 


BINGHAMTON 


57 


NASHVILLE 


58 


JACKSONVILLE 


59 


PHOENIX 


60 


BLOOM INGTON 


61 


ALBUQUERQUE 


62 


BROWNSVILLE 


63 


TOTALS 





5/1/52 
TV HOMES 



2,970,000 
1.185,000 



1,155.000 

1,042,000 

895,000 

667,000 

614,000 



428.000 
398,000 
386,000 
377,000 
364,000 
332,000 
323,000 
316,000 
274,000 
268,000 
220,750 
214,000 
210,000 
210,000 



207,000 

188.00O 

180,000 

169,000 

164,000 

164,000 

152,000 

147,000 

147,000 

144,000 

143,000 

141,000 

138,000 

130,000 

127,000 

124,000 

117,000 

1 1 4.0OO 

110,000 

103,000 

102,000 

93,000 

93,000 

92,300 

88,680 

86.000 

83,000 

83,000 

79,700 

79,100 

78,320 

77,500 

76,400 

73,000 

69,500 

66,000 

63,00O 

56,000 

39,400 

29,250 

14,200 

10,700 



17,296.800 



1/1/52 


RADIO-ONLY 


RADIO HOMES 


HOMES 


4,192.530 


1.222,530 


1,635,730 


450,730 


1,728,130 


573,130 


1.373.990 


331,990 


1,134,620 


239,620 


958.570 


291,570 


869,810 


255,810 


737,350 


309,350 


566,250 


168,250 


472,740 


86,740 


989,010 


612,010 


466.210 


102,210 


415,130 


83.130 


419,590 


96,590 


463,610 


147,610 


518,220 


244,220 


353,740 


85,740 


378.270 


157,520 


406.190 


192,190 


342,390 


132,390 


333,320 


123,320 


467,050 


260,050 


277,620 


89,620 


316,590 


136,590 


371,300 


202,300 


377,610 


213,610 


226,870 


62,870 


314,550 


162,550 


211,240 


64,240 


211.480 


64,480 


444,470 


300,470 


331,610 


188,610 


308,990 


167,990 


242,790 


104,790 


251,670 


121,670 


218,810 


91,810 


143,560 


19,560 


183,810 


66,810 


190,110 


76,110 


204,600 


94,600 


235,980 


132,980 


142,820 


40,820 


224,330 


131,330 


254,520 


161,520 


230,020 


137,720 


189,288 


100,600 


179,880 


93,880 


201,040 


118,040 


262,050 


179,050 


154,190 


74,490 


187,410 


108,310 


203,330 


125,010 


169,690 


92,190 


160,620 


84,220 


89,940 


16,940 


120,200 


50,700 


214,430 


14B.430 


225,520 


162,520 


107,620 


51,620 


117,110 


77,710 


150,810 


121,560 


51,340 


37,140 


64,170 


53,470 


27.986.430 


10,695,630 



•Homes figure is based on number of sets in market ; is not eorrcetcd for multiple set TV homes. 



126 



SPONSOR 




There's mor^ihan one reason wKy national advertisers consistently 
renew their Keystone time. They kno>/of Keystone's more than 

affiliates dotting the nation ana that all or only the number they 
need may be purchased in a package'- — with one time saving order. 

However, they ajsefrealize that the prosperous people living in Keystone's 
rich Hometown and Rural America are beyond effective television and they 

listen more often and longer to their local level KBS radio station than 
they do to the distant metropolitan stations.* Investigate the 
sales potential of Keystone's Market — and the ability of Keystone to produce it! 



•RMB REPORT 




NEW YORK: 580 FIFTH AVENUE 



CHICAGO: 111 W. WASHINGTON 



14 JULY 1952 



127 




1. In what rooms do they listen in radio- only and radio-TV homes? 

SOURCE: Joint CBS Radio Network-NBC Radio Network Survey by ARB, 1951 



Radio-only homes 

MORNING, 6 A.M.-12 NOON 



36.4% IP 



Radio-TV homes 






40.9' 



12.7% 



4.9% I 
1.2% 
3.9% 



LIVING ROOM lllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 20.1% 

K ITC H EN lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 

BEDROOM IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIll; 8.3% 

DINING ROOM llllllllllllllli: 6.3% 

AUTO HIM 4.2% 

OTHER llllllll 1.9% 



59.2% 



52.8' 



AFTERNOON, 12 NOON-6 P.M. 



24.4' 



11.4', 




LIVING ROOM 

KITCHEN 

BEDROOM 

DINING ROOM 

AUTO 

OTHER 



llllllllllllll 

mi 9.1% 

6.5% 
8.8% 
7.9% 



23.8% 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini 



43.9' 



59.4% 




EVENING, 6 P.M.-12 MIDNIGHT 

LIVING ROOM 

KITCHEN 

BEDROOM 

DINING ROOM 

AUTO 

OTHER 



5.1% 
6.5% 
7.8% 



miiiiimiimiiiimiii 29.0% 
iiimiiimiiimiiimiiimiimiiiiimiimiiii 37.4% 

14.2% 



49.5% i 



27.2% 



13.2' 



TOTAL DAY, 6 A.M. TO MIDNIGHT 

LIVING ROOM llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 

KITCHEN llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 

BEDROOM lllllllllllllllllllllill 9.6% 

3.6% ^n DINING ROOM llllllllllllllllllll 6.2% 

1.5% «■ AUTO IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIll 6.3% 

5.0%. 1^ OTHER llllllllllllllli 5.0% 



22.9% 



50.0% 



TV families listen most In hntehen 

There are significant differences in the rooms where listening 
takes place between radio-only and radio-TV families. The 
families with TV sets do more listening outside the living room 
than the radio-only families. Apparently, the presence of the 
TV set in the living room has cut down on the amount of 
listening that takes place there, and has made the so-called 
"secondary" sets in these radio-TV homes actually the "pri- 
mary" ones. As was indicated on the first page of this 
year's edition cf Radio Basics (bottom chart), radio-TV 
homes have more radios than radio-only homes. This helps to 



explain why the "dispersal effect" is greater in these homes. 
The room where half of the listening is done by radio-TV 
families is the kitchen (see chart immediately above this 
paragraph). Note that while radio-TV families spend 50.0% 
of their listening day in the kitchen, radio-only families spend 
almost the same proportion of their listening day (49.5%) 
in the living room. Bedroom listening increases in importance 
as the hour grows later, reaching its high point between 6 
p.m. and midnight when 14.2% of listening in radio-TV 
homes takes place in bedrooms and 15.2% of radio-only. 



128 



SPONSOR 




1 



s most far 



l^o w ATTS 




"Ed. Note: "We dont know what caused the Inc. but as 
Pal says the control room of WPAL did hum up recently. 
But, 30 minutes Inter PAL was back on the air from its 
transmitter, and is now back in the most modern studios in 
the city of Charleston." 



John E. Pearson Co. 
FOREIGN BARKERS: s E> . Dora . C |oyton Agency 



OF CHARLESTON 
SOUTH CAROLINA 



You would be amazed..* 




how far your budget can go in television 



Most stores weigh steak before trimming. 
A few trmi first — then weigh. The steak's 
the same. But the value's not. If you're 
paying for the trimmings in television, 
you, too, will find that Dollars Do More 
on Du Mont. 



DUMONT 



TELEVISION NETWORK 

515 Madison Avenue, New York 22, N. Y., MU 8-2600 
A Division of The Allen B. Du Mont Laboratories, Inc. 



BO 



SPONSOR 




Cost rise slows down 

If it weren't for the fact that network TV is on the verge of a 
mighty leap forward, when new stations come on the air, it 
could be said that there is an air of stability clothing the 
medium this fall. As it is, no sooner will the national adver- 
tiser settle down into TV with a sigh of familiarity than he 
will be dumped right out of his chair. 

As far as short-range plans go, however, the advertiser will 
find in this section much helpful information. Will there be 
an appreciable number of new TV stations on the air before 
Christmas? How many? 

Will there be a bigger market potential this fall for exist- 
ing stations? How many viewers will an advertiser be able to 
figure on by the end of the year? 

How about program and time costs? Going up at the same 
rate? Leveling off? (The answer, in brief, is that net TV's 
cost rise is slowing down.) 

A thorough coverage of time availabilities is also provided 
in this section plus listings of shows with participating spon- 
sorships which have openings for advertisers. The pros and 
cons of participations are discussed. 

Merchandising plans are touched on, too. And for those 
advertisers interested in the technical progress of TV, some 
of the more important developments are described. 

At the right is an index listing the topics covered. 



Cost (rends 132 

Nighttime availabilities 133 

Television map 137 

Program trends I 12 

Daytime TV I 13 

Participations 145 

Top TV sponsors 1 IB 

Merchandising I Hi 

Technical progress in tele- 
casting I Hi 

Dimensions 1 18 

Post-freeze TV 1 13 

Available net worth pack- 

ages, list I 19 

1 lira-high frequency (Mil ) 152 



14 JULY 1952 



131 



Cost trends 



Q. Will time costs continue to 
increase? 

A. Yes. but they will tend to level off 
somewhat this year, primarily because 
the increase in TV set sales has been 
leveling off. What the cost picture will 
be once the new TV stations come on 
the air in droves is another matter. 
While no exact answer can be given 
at this time, it is safe to say that the 
rate increase will be substantial enough 
to create a trend toward sharing of 
commercial time on a single program 
by several sponsors. 



Q. What network increases may 
a national advertiser figure on this 

year? 

A. Because of the great number of 
powerful, independent TV stations, the 
initiative in time cost changes does not 
come from the networks. The one-sta- 
tion market outlets, from which most 
of the increases will probably come, 



will raise their rates when they feel 
their increase in viewership warrants 
it. One network source estimated that 
the total network time cost increases 
between this past January and January 
1953, will average about 10%. The 
1 July station increases ranged between 
V, and 25% for the most part, but 
all stations did not raise rates at that 
time. WTTV in Bloomington, Ind., 
raised its basic rate lone-hour, one 
time) 150% but the new rate is still 
well below the average. The rate in- 
crease is actually a case of a small sta- 
tion earning a rate increase ($300) on 
the basis of a big relative jump in 
viewers in its market. Reasons for 
raising rates vary with the station. 



Q. To what extent are rate in- 
creases based on the increasing 
number of sets in the station's 
area? 

A. The number of sets is the basic 
factor in all rate increases. Small in- 
creases may be expected among some 
stations which increased their telecast- 



ing umbrella by increases in power 
and antenna height, but this is the op- 
posite side of the same coin. Recently, 
30 stations in 25 markets went ahead 
with such changes on the basis of pre- 
vious FCC decisions. The effect of 
these changes is to increase viewer 
potential in fringe areas. 

Increases in rates are also affected 
to a slight degree by general cost pres- 
sures, such as expenses. 

Of course, as any TV network sales- 
man will hasten to tell you. the impor- 
tant thing is not absolute time cost but 
cost-per- 1,000 sets. For example, while 
CBS time costs have increased about 
eight and one-half times since 1949, 
the web's circulation has been upped 
18 times. Other networks tell much 
the same story. According to Fred 
Thrower. CBS-TV sales head, there 
has been a "continued sharp drop in 
CBS-TV gross circulation cost-per-1,- 
000 homes from $3.45 in January, 
1949, to $1.74 currently (June)." 

Q. Are daytime TV costs much 
cheaper than nighttime? 




Talt'tit costs t'ontinue up but production economies are in the offing 



TV nets continue talent raids with consequent cost increases. Jackie 
Gleason (above) switch trom DuMont to CBS is case in point as is 
W. Minor (shown at left center picture) move from CBS to NBC. 
Low-cost show like DTN "Rocky King" (above, right) are few. 




Production economies are being achieved with new TV centers like 
CBS' new New York studios, to be located in former Sheffield plant. 
New show trends for fall include NBC plans for Ralph Edwards show 
(center) and CBS' bringing over "Guiding Light" to TV (star at right) 



™ 




A. Time costs during the day are 
roughly half of those at night and pro- 
gram costs tend to be much less. Cost- 
per-l,00Q is about the same day and 
night. 



Q. What will program costs be 
in general this fall? 

A. Like time costs, program costs in 
general are leveling off. In individual 
cases, competitive bidding for top- 
drawer talent may push up prices be- 
yond the norm. For instance, in recent 
network raids NBC took Worthington 
Minor from CBS and CBS, in turn, 
lured Jackie Gleason from DuMont. 
The announced program costs are, re- 
spectively, $35,00 and $65,000 per 
hour per week. 

Film is considered a way out of the 
high-cost problem. But while the ad- 
ditional cost of filming a program 
may be recouped later, the fact re- 
mains that a sponsor can figure on lay- 
ing out at least an additional $5,000 a 
week for putting his show on film. 
Another cost factor enters when a 
show has been running for a long time: 



top talent and production people ex- 
pect (and get I escalated raises in their 
contracts. 



Q. Is there any effort being made 
to reduce program costs? 

A. Y es s in the sense that any pro- 
ducer will try to avoid unnecessary ex- 
penses. Such things as rear-screen pro- 
jection and special effects have been 
helpful in the past and studio people, 
as well as outsiders, are always look- 
ing for new gimmicks to cut costs. 
Film producers for TV are especially 
cost-conscious, being aware that creat- 
ing a movie for the TV market of 109 
stations is far different from making 
a movie for thousands of exhibitors, 
'i et, there is also the awareness that 
a national advertiser will expect a 
handsome smoothly - produced show- 
case for his product when he decides 
to turn lo film programing. 

Production costs will be pared in 
the future as a by-product of new 
studio facilities and the knowledge 
gained by experience in producing TV 
allows. CBS' Television Citv in Holh- 



wood has mechanized a good deal of 
the backstage scene-shift inn techniques 
and the net's purchase ol tin- Sheffield 
Farms Co. building in New York Cit) 
will also lead to studio economies. 

DuMont, unable to match the high 
priced shows of its competitors, seeks 
customers by specializing in low-cost 
m\ stery programs. 



Nighttime availabilities 

Q. Has the fever to get into night- 
time TV abated? 

A. The fever is still there but it is 
offset a little this year by second looks 
at cost vs. the bankroll. Even with a 
top-rated star like Milton Berle, for ex- 
ample, the Texaco people found their 
Star Theater a heavy, financial burden 
(it weighs about $6 million a year). 
Starting this fall, Buick will shoulder 
one-fourth of the cost (for oncc-ever\- 
four-weeks sponsorship). 

On the whole, TV sales are running 
ahead of last year, and there is ever) 
evidence that advertisers will continue 




#/o.v.vc*©i*#* o#* itvltriprk sp&nsorsh ip 



Number of sponsorec 
by 


net TV shows 
product groups 


Number of sponsored 
by show types 


net 


TV shows 






n 


No 


on 


TV 


Type of program 




No 


on 


TV 


Sponsor classificatio 


1951 = 
(I Jan. 
thru 15 

tin.) 


1952 
(April) 




1951 

(Oct. 


> 


1952 
< Ipril 


Automobiles & Accessories 




16 




13 
9 
6 


Children's Variety 




8 




7 


3everaqes 




14 




Comedy-Variety 




JL°_ 




11 


Clothing 




15 


Comedy -Situation 




10 


! 


9 


Commentary, Interviews 




7 


6 






9 




7 


Confections 


Drama: Straight Drama 




18 




17 


Cosmetics, Toilet Requisites 


17 




11 


Juvenile & Western 




10 




8 


Druqs & Drug Products 




13 




14 


Mystery & Detection 




22 


26 


Foods & Food Products 




41 




33 

4 


Farm Programs 








Film News 












6 




Gasoline & Lubricants 


Forums 




3 


4 


Home Furnishings 


26 




23 

7 


Health Talks 










Institutional 




8 


Home Economics 




5 




2 


Insurance 




1 




1 


Musical & Musical Variety 


13 




11 


News 




3 


5 






7 




6 


Jewelry & Accessories 


Panel Quiz 




8 




8 


Miscellaneous 




4 




6 


Quiz & Participation 




13 


12 


Publications 


2 




3 


Religious 




4 


3 


Religious Groups 




6 




3 


Serials 




5 




7 


Sports 




8 


7 






10 




9 




Soap & Soap Products 


Variety — Straight 




19 




n 


Tobacco 




11 




11 


Variety — Talent 




4 


4 



14 JULY 1952 



133 



You get RESULTS beyond the expected 






FOR LOCAL 
AND REGIONAL 
SPONSORSHIP 
ON FILM... 








the greatest name} 
television programi^ 




OTHER GREAT ZIV SHOWS 



BOSTON BLACKIE • YOUR TV THEATRE 
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• WESTERNS • CARTOONS 



then you telecast . 



in 



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sfto <*<5^r e 



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—■—Sri- *c:^r; 

A "° «W «o»„ """«' »«.» 







--rfS*^' 






/"\N Saturday night, February 16, 1952, 
^"^ WSM-TV staged a 7'/ 2 hour Telethon 
to raise money for the Middle Tennessee 
Heart Association Fund. What happened 
contains food for thought for every adver- 
tiser interested in selling the heart of the 
Central South. 




• Over 200 artists (all WSM, and WSM- 
TV staffers), folk and popular, appeared be- 
fore the WSM-TV cameras. 

• After 2,100 plus calls, phone facilities 
were so hopelessly jammed that people 
drove as far as 70 miles to make contribu- 
tions in person. 

y&& 2,161 individual pledges were recorded 
before the Telethon went off the air. 

public 



rvice 



• Pledges came in from a six state area, 

rfrom points as far north as Evansville, 

Indiana, and as far west as Jonesboro, 
Arkansas. 



Note well three things . . . public service beyond 
the call of duty . . . talent better than 200 strong 
. . . coverage far greater than normal. All these 
add up to an extraordinarily effective sales medium 
for your product. Irving Waugh or any Petry Man 
can fill in the details. 



Channel 4 Nashville 



WSM-TV 




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ts in Canad 
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rs in Mexica- 

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irch 









Los. Angeles 



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14 JULY 1952 



KTLA Studios • 5451 Marathon St., Los Angeles 38 • Hollywood 9-6363 
Eastern Offices • 1501 Broadway, New York 36 • BRyant 9-8700 

PAUL H. RAYMER COMPANY • NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



ALWAYS IN FRONT BY AN 



■yj ± .y^ 1 1 j 1 1 j | 3 fcf IJJ -CT^ 



141 



PINPOINT 

YOUR 
PERSISTENT 

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SELLING PROSPEROUS 

SOUTHERN NEW ENGLAND 

with 

UNDUPLICATED COVERAGE 

in 220,000 HOMES! 

WJAR-TV 

Providence 

Represented Nationally by 

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In New England — Bertha Bannan 



to pour money into TV. Last year 
more than $480 million was spent for 
all TV advertising, 7%% of all major 
media advertising dollars, and some 
quarters expect this year's TV total to 
run between $600 and $700 million. 
Last years network TV time sales total 
was $128 million. 



Q. Are there any nighttime avail- 
abilities? 

A. For the advertiser seeking broad 
network coverage, there is very little 
top-rated time that he can step into 
at night with a new program. There 
are more than 40 markets where only 
one program can be telecast during 
any one time segment. Clearing time 
across-the-board is a stupendous task 
and if a spot operation is tabooed for 
some reason, the advertiser will have 
to settle for much less than national 
coverage. 

Still open is the CBS slot opposite 
NBC's Milton Berle on Tuesdays be- 
tween 8:00 and 9:00 p.m. NBC has 
open at 8:00 to 9:00 p.m. on Wednes- 
day, is planning to throw Worthington 
Minor, of CBS' Studio One fame, 
against Arthur Godfrey and his 
Friends. (Although not officially an- 
nounced, the Kate Smith Evening Hour 
is not expected to return in the fall. 
The show failed to hold its own against 
Godfrey.) 

CBS has plenty of Saturday night 
time available and will use Jackie 
Gleason for an hour, aiming its com- 
petitive fire at either the NBC All Star 
Revue between 8:00 and 9:00 p.m. 
or Your Show of Shows, 9:00 to 10:30 
p.m. (decision on exactly where to slot 
Gleason was not yet made at press 
time). Both networks say they are 
looking for single sponsors for Minor 
and Gleason. They will, of course, sell 
the shows on a co-sponsored or part h i- 
pating basis, if they have to. 

Some of the fractional network sus- 
tainers which DuMont is offering in- 
clude Twenty Questions, Friday, 8:30 
to 9:00 p.m.. on seven stations (DTN's 
cost-per-1,000 figure on the show is 
$6.38) ; This is Music, Thursday, 
10:00 to 10:30 p.m.. also on seven 
slations: What's the Story?, Thursday, 
9:30 to 10:00 p.m. on six stations, and 
Down )<>u Co, Friday, 8:00 to 8:30 
p.m., <>n eight stations. 

At ABC, new program plans are 
ideas rather than realities. There is an 
unsettled air at the nci because of the 
prolonged FCC hearings on its pro- 



posed merger with United Paramount 
Theaters. If an advertiser wants to 
bring in a new program, that's agree- 
able to ABC, but the network is not 
anxious to build new shows. As for 
time availabilities, here are some of 
the choicest: 8:00 to 8:30 p.m., Mon- 
day through Friday; 9:30 to 10:00 
p.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays, and 
9:00 to 9:30 p.m, Thursdays. 



Q. What about buying into exist- 
ing nighttime shows? 

A. For some advertisers the best an- 
swer may be: If you can't beat 'em, 
join 'em. Participating sponsorship of 
an existing and widely telecast, well- 
rated show 7 may be an ideal solution 
if the advertiser can reach the audi- 
ence he wants. As of this writing, here 
are some of the unsold show portions: 

On NBC, the 10:00 to 10:30 p.m. 
portion of Your Shoiv of Shows on 
alternate Saturdays; also one minute 
of commercial time on the same pro- 
gram weekly; the possibility of co- 
sponsoring the Worthington Minor 
show has been mentioned: also alter- 
nate weeks on One Man's Family, 7:30 
to 8:00 p.m.. Saturday: alternate 
weeks on Kukla, Fran and Ollie, 6:00 
to 6:30 p.m., Sunday (replacing Roy 
Rogers, who will be moved forward a 
half hour) . 

Aside from the Jackie Gleason show, 
which CBS would like to sell in one 
piece, there are two new fall programs 
which have alternate weeks open. They 
are It's News to Me, starting 3 Octo- 
ber, 10:30 to 11:00 p.m. Fridays, and 
Balance Your Budget, starting 14 Octo- 
ber, same time. Tuesdays. 

At ABC. among those plans in the 
definite stage is the transfer of Ozzie 
and Harriet to TV. The intention is to 
put it on film hut no time has been set. 
The network reports that General Elec- 
tric has bought alternate weeks and 
that half the show is still open. Pro- 
gram costs will be $30,000 for a half- 
hour, it is believed. 



Program trends 



Q. What's the big program trend 
on network TV? 

A. The phenomenal audience figures 
for / Love Lucy have set off a trend 
toward situation comedy programs 



142 



SPONSOR 



which will probably continue until 
telecasting is surfeited with them. Al- 
though NBC expects its TV evening 
schedule to be packed pretty tight by 
fall, it has packaged some new shows 
of the situation comedy type. At this 
time, most of them are on a stand-by 
basis ready to be thrown into what- 
ever time slots become available. 

Among them are Life of Riley, 
Duffy's Tavern, and Ethel and Albert, 
the latter salvaged from the now-de- 
funct Kate Smith Evening Hour. One 
of the new packages, Mr. Peepers, 
starring Wally Cox, is a Ford summer 
offering. NBC hopes it will pan out 
well enough to warrant Ford's con- 
tinuing it in the fall. CBS recently 
sold Our Miss Brooks to General 
Foods for the Friday 9:30 to 10:00 
p.m. spot, and has Life with Luigi in 
process of conversion to TV. 



Q. Will the trend to putting live 
network shows on film continue in 
the fall? 

A. The consensus of opinion is that 
the trend will continue. The prejudice 
against film which existed a couple of 
years ago has been pretty well elimi- 
nated due to the successful conversion 
of many popular programs. 

Some network executives look with 
no little alarm at the progressively 
strong swing to film. As one of them 
put it: "There's still something to be 
said for spontaneity." 

Many advertisers and agencies like 
film because fluffs and weak moments 
can be shot over again. They are also 
keeping in mind the huge potential 
market in areas that don't have TV 
now and the savings involved in re- 
running the films when new TV sta- 
tions go on the air. However, there is 
a common feeling that filming costs 
should be brought down somehow. 



Daytime TV 



Q. Is daytime viewing increasing? 

A. Yes. A recent Nielsen report says 
that average U.S. TV viewing has 
doubled during morning hours. Spe- 
cifically, the survey dicovered that be- 
tween 7:00 a.m. and noon on week- 
days, listening increased from 13 min- 
utes per TV home per day during De- 
cember, 1951, to 27 minutes in March 
1952. Between noon and 6:00 p.m., 




FREE & PETERS NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 

•Sales Management, Jan. 1952. 



14 JULY 1952 



143 



the coresponding increase was from 
()(> minutes to 84 minutes. 



Q. What new program plans are 
shaping up for daytime TV? 

A. The biggest news is NBC's talk 
about making a spirited bid for view- 
ers during the 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. 
segment on weekdays. Up to now, 
CBS has had pretty much its own way 
during that time. The NBC plans have 
not jelled but Balph Edwards is being 
readied for an audience participation 
show. There are also rumors about 
NBC's introducing soap operas which 
involve a "new technique."' but the net- 
work won't be pinned down on this 
point. NBC is also extending its late 
afternoon coverage by bringing Wel- 
come Travelers over from radio and in- 
serting it in the 3:30 to 4:00 p.m. slot. 
Procter and Gamble will sponsor the 
program but has not decided whether 
to run it three, four, or five days. 

Among the other networks, ABC is 
considering grooming its Breakfast 
Club for simulcast in the fall, but plans 
depend on the approval of the shows 
■current sponsors. 

CBS has already dipped into radio 
for new daytime fare. Starting 30 
June, it substituted a popular radio 
soap opera, Guiding Light, for The 
First Hundred Years, which had been 
on weekdays for Procter and Gamble. 
This marked the first entry of a radio 
soap opera into TV programing. P & 
G retains sponsorship. 

Other changes in the CBS daytime 
fall schedule include the extension of 
the Godfrey morning show to one hour 
and slicing of the after-noon Garry 
Moore show to a half an hour. Start- 
ing 6 October. Campbell Soup will 
sponsor Double or Nothing on Mon- 
days. Wednesdays, and Fridays at 
2:00 to 2:30 p.m. in place of half the 
Moore show. CBS will also add Art 
Linkletter's Houseparty from 3:00 to 
3:30 p.m. 



Q. What are the daytime partici- 
pation availabilities? 

A. Aside from the projected plans for 
the late morning. NBC offers the Gar- 
roway show, Today, which is telecasl 
to the eastern half of the I'.S. from 
7:00 to 0:01) a.m. 'Today has a compli- 
cated sponsorship pattern because of 
its huge time bulk, but an advertiser 
-'•(•king to reach carls morning view- 




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144 



SPONSOR 



ers can be fairly certain that time will 
be available to suit his purpose. Spon- 
sors have used Today for short-term 
saturation purposes as well as for long- 
range sales campaigns. 

NBC also has two quarter-hoHrs of 
Gabby Hayes (5:15 to 5:30 p.m.) and 
the possibility exists that there may be 
openings in the Kate Smith and Howdy 
Doody late afternoon shows. 

At CBS, the sustaining soaper The 
Egg and I is open for single quarter- 
hour buys across the board on week- 
days, and there are also openings in 
the Garry Moore Show. The Godfrey 
Time show in the morning may have 
two quarter hours left by the time you 
read this and, if Lever Bros, doesn't 
pick up its option on Art Linkletters' 
Houseparty, there will be two quarter 
hours available there, too. CBS' Quiz 
Kids, Sunday between 4:00 and 4:30 
p.m., has alternate weeks for sale. 



Participations 



Q. Is participating sponsorship 
popular among big advertisers? 
A. Yes. Edward I). Madden, NBC 
vice president, disclosed in a recent 
speech that I 1 ) 48 of the 50 "leading ' 
advertisers are using TV and (2) 36 
of the 48 on TV are using some form 
of participating sponsorship. He also 
said that 35 of the second 50 are on 
TV, and 19 of these also use some 
form of participating sponsorship. 



Q. Are there advantages to adver- 
tisers in participating sponsorship? 

A. The NBC-Hofstra studies hinted 
at certain conclusions about participa- 
tions that fit in very nicely with the 
trend toward such advertising. It was 
indicated that while viewer recall ia- 
creased as the advertising increased 
( in terms of length of time ) , the per- 
centage of increase lessened after a 
while. To put it in simple terms, if the 
advertiser doubled his program length, 
viewer recall would increase but not 
in the same proportion. The increase, 
for example, might be only 50% in- 
stead of 100%, although there is an 
additional factor here involving an in- 
crease in penetration. 

The conclusion to be drawn from 
this is that an advertiser might do bet- 
ter to sponsor two half-hour programs 
than one full hour program. Dr. 



Thomas Coffin, supervisor of program 
research at NBC. points out that par- 
ticipations produce more sales effec- 
tiveness per dollar spent, according to 
figures in NBC's TV/Today study. 



Q. Are there any disadvantages 
to participating sponsorship? 

A. Other things being equal, there is 
unquestionably a loss of impact if. for 
example, an advertiser switches Irom 
sponsoring a full half hour to sharing 
the time land not buying any other 
TV time) or sponsoring the same pro- 
gram on alternate weeks. Sponsor 
identification is lost also. In the case 
of two different shows alternating dur- 
ing the same time slot with two differ- 
ent advertisers there is the further 
danger that viewers will forget which 
program is on during a particular 
week. This was pointed out in an Ad- 
vertest Research study last year. The 
study, however, concluded that, de- 
spite this disadvantage an alternate 
week TV show can be "a strong audi- 
ence builder and an effective adver- 
tising vehicle." 



Q. Is participating sponsorship 
here to stay? 

A. The pressure behind the growth 
of participating sponsorship — the high 
cost of TV — will continue and partici- 
pating sponsorship will grow with it. 
Additional TV markets are bound to 
mean additional (josts — there's no get- 
ting away from that. 

The final effect of all this will un- 
doubtedly be to push TV toward the 
"magazine concept" of advertising. 
This means that TV program content 
will be completely created and con- 
trolled by the network. Advertisers 
will buy "pages" or segments of time 
where they feel they can get the best 
audience for their product. 

During the day, for example, a net- 
work may set up "departments" or 
block programing with one block 
aimed at the children's market, one at 
the women's market, etc. And adver- 
tisers will buy into one or more of 
these departments, depending on the 
audience he wants to reach and how 
much he can afford. 



Q. Are there other ways to use 
TV beside alternate-week pro- 
graming and participations that 



14 JULY 1952 



WAVE-TV 

in KENTUCKY! 
in AUDIENCE! 



Every day of the 
week, 10.9% more 
homes tune to 

WAVE -TV 

than to Louisville's 
second station! 



( According to scientific 
survey made by Dr. Ray- 
mond A. Kemper, Head of 
the Psychological Services 
Center, University of 
Louisville, in WAVE-TV 
area, March, 1952) 

WAVE-TV 

CHANNEL 5 
NBC • ABC • DUM0NT 

LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY 

4» Cr3=»FREE & PETERS, Inc. 
Exclusive National Representatives 

145 



networks offer to a moderate-bud- 
get sponsor? 

A. There are no really cheap formu- 
lae available for advertisers who find 
network TV beyond their budget. 
Some efforts have been made to bring 
down program costs. DuMont offers 
low-cost mystery shows. ABC is toy- 
ing with the idea of breaking up some 
valuable nighttime slots into 15-minute 
programs. The latter move is con- 
sidered on the theory that everybody 
would like it: The sponsor would get 
a complete program for himself at a 
price he can presumably afford and 
would hit his customers with commer- 
cials every week. The stations would 
make more money since two quarter- 
hour programs bring in more cash 
than one half-hour program. 

This approach would not solve time 
clearance problems, however, and 
would even aggravate them if, for ex- 
ample, the network could sell the first 
quarter-hour, but not the second. It 
would also bring to the fore some new 
programing problems, since a quarter- 
hour limits the kind of show that can 
be telecast. The program would, in 
addition, have to be competitive in 
appeal with the bigger, more handsome 
offerings on at the same time. 



Top TV sponsors 



KrMB 



Channel -8 



SAN DIEGO'S 

lSI <cuwL otdcf 
TV STATION 

4t<ut6et4, CALIF'S. 
THIRD MARKET 



San Diego's 

Electric Power 

Sales in 1951 

were 21% 

higher than 1950 



Wise Buyers Buy 
KFMB-TV, AM 



TV - CHANNEL 



AM . 550 K. C. 



KFMB - 5th and Ash, San Diego I, Calif. 

John A. Kennedy, Board Chairman 
Howard L. Chernoff, Gen. Mgr. 



146 



Q. Who are the top 10 advertisers 
on network TV? 

A. In order, they are Procter & Gam- 
ble, General Foods, R. J. Reynolds To- 
bacco, Colgate-Palmolive- Peet, Liggett 
& Myers, P. Lorillard, Ford Motor, 
American Tobacco, Lever Bros., Kel- 
"',--■ 



Merchandis ing 

Q. What do networks offer the 
advertiser in merchandising aid? 

A. The opinion of non-network peo- 
ple is that not much in the way of mer- 
chandising aid has been offered TV 
clients so far. The reason cited is sim- 
ply that networks felt they didn't have 
to offer such help since what the spon- 
sor really wanted was network time. 
There have been occasional instances 
of tailored merchandising support but 
nothing in the way of over-all network 
aggressiveness. 

NBC is now laying plans for a TV 
merchandising operation. It will be 
joined to the present radio merchan- 
dising setup in the fall and will be 
under the over-all supervision of Fred 
Dodge. The 12 radio field representa- 
tives now under Dodge will take over 
TV as well once the TV merchandising 
operation gets under way. 

In radio the field representatives 
work directly with stations but also 
cover major retailers, such as the food 
and drug chains. Part of their job is 
to help stations help themselves — in 
the setting up of station merchandising 
departments and in advising stations 
on non-network merchandising prob- 
lems. 



Technical progress in 
telecasting 

Q. What are the new develop- 
ments in kinescoping? 

A. There haven't been any important 
technical developments but networks 
are learning to refine the making of 
good kinescope prints or TVRs (tele- 
vision recordings), as they are often 
called. 

Improvements are being made all 
the way down the line to sharpen the 



print. Greater attention is being paid 
to lighting and in training studio tech- 
nicians in proper lighting requirements 
for TVRs. As one network executive 
put it: "There's no sense in making a 
kine of a mystery drama where a guy 
lights a match in a dark room, ft just 
won't come over." Camera techniques 
have been improved also, and in pro- 
cessing and recording, electronic and 
chart controls have been developed. 



Q. What is a "hot kine"? 

A. This is a new development which 
saw the light of day this past spring. 
For example: the Dinah Shore pro- 
gram is telecast from Hollywood at 
4:30 p.m. in order to reach the huge 
Eastern market at 7:30 p.m. At the 
same time a TVR is made on 35 mm 
film in Hollywood. It is processed at 
high speed and the program is reshown 
for West Coast listeners three hours 
later. In contrast to the usual situa- 
tion, the TVR doesn't leave the studio. 
The print is made on 35 mm film 
rather than 16 mm because engineers 
feel that a better picture can be tele- 
cast with 35 mm. Not all stations have 
35 mm equipment, however. 



Q. Is there any new telecasting 
equipment being developed? 

A. A compact camera - transmitter, 
known as the "walkie-lookie," which is, 
in effect, a portable TV station, was 
scheduled to make its debut at the Re- 
publican convention in Chicago. It 
has no connecting cable to limit its 
meandering among the hubbub on the 
convention floor. 

A new mobile unit now being built 
will have complete TV facilities plus 
motion picture equipment, including 
an instantaneous film developer. The 
unit will also carry TV film projection 
equipment so that film sequences 
which might be out of range of the 
TV camera can be integrated with the 
live presentation. 



Q. What about technical devel- 
opments in the future? 

A. Some of the Buck Rogerish plans 
include: 

1. A robot camera, electrically con- 
trolled by the cameraman in the studio 
just as robot planes are now controlled. 

2. An air-borne TV camera, which 
could cover sporting events, such as 
golf matches, from a helicopter. 

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RADIO: WKZO, Kalamazoo, and WJEF, Grand 
Rapids, a CBS comhination, deliver about 57% 
more city listeners than the next-best two-station 
choice in these cities. The 1949 BMB Report 
shows tremendous rural circulation, too — a 46.7% 
increase over 1946 in unduplicated daytime audi- 
ence ... a 52.9% increase at night! In the Grand 
Rapids area alone, this amounts to an undupli- 
cated coverage of 60,000 homes, day and night. 
Best of all, WKZO-W JEF cost 20% less than the 
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It is in the practical development stage 
now. 

3. Trans-oceanic broadcasts which 
are being studied with the idea of us- 
ing regular commercial planes for air- 
borne relays without any significant 
change in airline scheduling. It has 
been conservatively estimated that Eu- 
rope is about 11 "hops" away — each 
hop being from one plane to another. 

4. A mobile unit capable of being 
carried in a flying boxcar. It is a pos- 
sibility because of the work being done 



today in smaller cameras and relay 
transmitters. 

Dimensions 

Q. What are the present dimen- 
sions of network TV? 

A. As of today, there are 108 U.S. T\ 
stations on the air. They are distrib- 
uted among 63 markets, two-thirds of 
them having only one station. This 
one-station market factor colors almost 
every aspect of telecasting and has been 
a prime causal force in many of TV's 



how important is 
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WSAZ-TV 



HUNTINGTON, W. VIRGINIA 
represented by the KATZ AGENCY 



h a n n 



148 



important trends. (An additional TV 
station in Mexico covers part of Texas 
so that there are actually 109 U.S. 
stations. ) 

Q How many listeners can a na- 
tional advertiser figure on during 
the remainder of the year? 

A. The figure for 1 October, based 
on past deliveries of TV sets by manu- 
facturers, will be about 57 million lis- 
teners. By the end of the year, it will 
be about 60 million. This is derived 
by the rule-of-thumb estimate that each 
set has an average of three viewers. 
These are projected figures that carry- 
forward a known sales trend and so 
cannot take into account such intangi- 
bles as the effect of the political cam- 
paign on TV set sales. 

New TV set brands and some ex- 
tremely heavy ad budgets by present 
set manufacturers will also affect the 
fall sales picture. And finally, there 
is the matter of viewing by those who 
don't own sets but who will be planted 
in their neighbors' living rooms during 
the Presidential campaign. 

Post-freeze TV 

Q. What is the long-range pic- 
ture in network TV? 

A. For those who like to polish a 
crystal ball, there is the prediction by 
Edward D. Madden, vice president in 
charge of TV sales and operations at 
NBC (details in Television Basics sec- 
tion ) . Madden expects 80 new TV 
markets to be opened next year and a 
total of 315 markets three years from 
now. By the fall of 1955, he said, 
there will be around 600 TV stations 
and about 95 million viewers. 

The national advertiser can well im- 
agine that once this year is gone the 
crescendo of change will be deafening. 
He will have to be fast on his feet and 
well-equipped with the latest research 
data, for day-by-day decisions will be 
the rule for a long time. 

In a recent speech to the Life In- 
surance Association of America, David 
Sarnoff, RCA chairman, carried the 
prediction of TV sets on the air some 
two years further into the future. By 
mid-1957, he stated, there will be 1,500 
stations and 50.000.000 TV sets in use 
in the country. These figures were 
topped by C. E.'s Dr. W. R. G. Baker 
who forecast an "eventual" 2.000 sta- 
tions and 53.000.000 TV sets in use in 
the United States. 

SPONSOR 



Q. What new TV markets are 
likely to be opened up first? 

A. According to Charles E. Midgely, 
Jr., manager of broadcast media at the 
Ted Bates agency the following mar- 
kets will probably be first: Denver, 
Portland, Ore.; the Tampa-St. Peters- 
burg, Springfield-Holyoke, Massachu- 
setts areas; Youngstown, Wichita. 
Flint, Spokane, the Beaumont-Port Ar- 
thur area, and Duluth. 



Q. What will be the procedure 
and scheduling of FCC's applica- 
tion hearings? 

A. FCC has set up a "priority list" 
for the hearings, which began 1 July. 
It does not govern the actual order in 
which applicants will be finally li- 
censed. This list is just a tentative 
schedule for the hearings — the order 
in which applications will be processed 



by FCC — without any commitment as 
to length of hearing or outcome. 



Q. How will time costs be af- 
fected by new TV stations and 
added TV markets? 

A. A Class A half-hour show (NBC- 
TV network I today costs a sponsor 
$25,842.60, and reaches just under 
40'; of United States homes in the 63 
existing TV markets. If times charges 
rise in proportion to the number of 
homes reached, then a comparative 
half-hour will cost $34,922.50 to reach 
50% of United States homes; $69,845 
to reach all the homes in the United 
States — a theoretical 100' , . 

In old TV markets, new stations will 
fix their rates in proportion to the 
number of sets in the area, whereas 
new TV markets will set an arbitrary 
minimum figure. 



\\ hile rates w ill go up as new mar- 
kets are added to tin- nation's I \ 
skein, the rise in costs will be partialis 
offset eventual!) by the fact thai mam 
one-station markets will become three- 
and four-station markets. This means 
that viewing will be split up among 
networks with none of the three and 
four stations having as many list 
at any one time as the single station 
had in the halcyon days. 

The station that formerly had the 
market to itself will certainl) not be 
able to raise rates as it did in the past 
and. indeed, the possibility exists that, 
if competition is keen, it may have to 
lower them. And the new stations 
< nming into an erstwhile one-station 
market may never be able to get their 
rates up to the level that once existed 
when one station monopolized the 
best shows and the audience. 



Available network package programs (TV) 

11111111,1111111111,1111111111111 Illllllllllllllil Illllli m"«m n» mini iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii mum mini mum mum uiiiiiuiiiiuiiiiiniiiiiiiiiii mm iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiuiiii 



ABC TV package availabilities 



TITLE 


TYPE 


APPEAL 


Tl 


ME 


PRICE 


TESTED 


EXPLANATION 


AMERICA SPEAKS 


Poll 


Adult 


IS min. 


l/wk 


$2,900-3.200 


no 


Dr Gallup brines nationally famous Gallup Poll to TV 


AMERICAS TOWN MEETING 


Forum 


Adult 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$5,200-5.600 


yes 


The "Dean" of open forums 


MR. ARSENIC 


Documentary 


Adult 


30 min. 


1 wk 


$2,200-2.500 


yes 


Burton Turkus — inside stories of the crime world 


THE BIG HERO 


Comedy- Mystery 


Adult 


30 min. 


1 wk 


$10,500-11.500 


yes 


Ernest Truex in a comedy-mystery series 


BY-LINE 


Drama Adult 


30 min. 


1 wk 


$10,200-11.000 


yes 


Melodrama — with a newspaper background — Betty Furness 
stars 


CROSSFIRE 


Dlscussion 


Adult 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$4,500-5.000 


yes 


Washington commentators panel — Elmer Davis— Bert An- 
drews 


COUNTRY LAWYER 


Comedy- Drama 


Family 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$16-18.000 


yes 


Comedy-drama with Thomas Mitchell as star 


FOUR SQUARE COURT 


Discussion 


Adult 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$3-4.000 


yes 


Ex-convicts, criminologists, parolees panel with a name 
moderator 


GAME OF THE WEEK 


Sports 


Family 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$10,000 


yes 


Highlights of best college football games each Sat. on film 


THE HOME SHOW 


Homemaker 


Family 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$3,400-4.000 


yes 


Homecrafting show featuring Norman Brokenshlre 


HORIZONS 


Forum 


Adult 


30 min. 


I'wk 


$2-3.000 


yes 


Columbia University forum with top faculty brains and 
students In open discussion 


THE HOT SEAT 


Discussion 


Adult 


30 min. 


I wk 


$2,200-2.600 


yes 


Stuart Scheftel and name interrogators probe controversial 
figures 


HOW DID THEY GET THAT WAY? 


Discussion 


Adult 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$3,700-4.000 


yes 


Psychiatrists on modern day problems 


THE JIMMY FIDDLER SHOW 


Interview 


Adult 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$3,500-4.500 


no 


Top Hollywood stars and prevues of outstanding unreleased 
movies 


JUNIOR CIRCUS 


Children 


Children 


30 min. 


1 wk 


$6,400-7.000 


yes 


Real circus acts with trimmings — from Chicago 


MICHAEL SHAYNE 


Mystery 


Adult 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$9,600-10.600 


yes 


Private eye series with movle-pocketbook series 


NEWSSTAND THEATRE 


Orama 


Family 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$10,500-11.500 


yes 


Runs the gamut of all types of drama, best magazine storid 


ON TRIAL 


Discussion 


Adult 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$1,500-2.000 


yes 


Jurists probe current news events — national Issues "on trial ' 


ONE FALSE STEP 


Drama 


Adult 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$10-11.000 


yes 


Exciting case histories — Hollywood origination 


PAPA WAS A PREACHER 


Comedy 


Family 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$13,500-15.500 


yes 


Period situation comedy of a minister and his family in 
1900's 


PAUL DIXON 


Musical 


Family 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$1,500-2.000 


yes 


Music and comedy with pantomime — musical personalities 


PAUL WHITEMAN REVUE 


Musical 


Family 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$27,500-28.500 


yes 


Musical extravaganza with name stars and full orchestra 


THE PEOPLE'S CHOICE 


Musical 


Family 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$10,800-11.500 


yes 


Congressmen sponsor outstanding talent frosi their home 
states — Jack Barry co-ordinates 


THE PROFESSOR 


Drama 


Adult 


30 min. 


1 wk 


$10-11.000 


yes 


Suspense drama with Jos. Schlldkraut — from Hollywood 


RENDEZVOUS 


Drama 


Adult 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$11.-13.000 


yes 


Foreign Intrigue adventure with Nona Massey as star 


SAY IT WITH ACTING 


Participation 


Family 


30 min. 


1 wk 


$5.300-$5.800 


yes 


Charades — Clayton Collier keeps score on teams from Broad- 
way shows 



14 JULY 1952 



149 



STARS AND STARTERS 


Musical 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$10,500-11.000 


yes 


Name stars sponsor up-and-comers; Jack Barry as m.c. 


THE STORY TELLER 


Readings 


Family 


IS 


min. 


l/wk 


$2,700-3,000 


yes 


Raymond Edward Johnson narrates most famous short stories 


SUPER CIRCUS 


Juvenile 


Children 


30 


min. 


1 wk 


$4,000-4,500 


yes 


The original TV circus from Chicago 


TALKING IT OVER WITH TILLIE 


Juvenile 


Children 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$3,700-4,000 


yes 


■Alice in Wonderland" type of fantasy — Mary Ann O'Neill 


TAM OSHANTER 


Sports 


Mile 


60 


min. 


(O.T.O.)$4-5,000 


no 


Greatest golf tournaments of the year 


UNITED OR NOT 


Discussion 


Adult 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$1,500-2.500 


yes 


Correspondents query U. N. leaders 



CBS TV package availabilities 



TITLE 


TYPE 


APPEAL 




TIME 


PRICE 




EXPLANATION 


ADVENTURES OF CASS DALEY 


Musical Comedy 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$28,500 




Unsophisticated country girl whose father has struck oil, 
attempts to crash N. Y. 


EDDIE BRACKEN STORY 


Situation 
Comedy 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$29,500 




Eddie Bracken and his fruitless pursuit of Connie Monahan 
(film) 


CRIME PHOTOGRAPHER 


Drama 


Family 


30 


min. 


1, wk 


$12,500 




Ccsey. ace photographer, solves crimes 


THE EGG AND 1 


Daytime Drama 


Family 


15 


min. 


5/wk 


$14,500 
$2,900 for 


<U hr. 


Story of a city couple who move to the country to raise 
chickens 


JACKIE GLEASON 


Variety 


Family 


1 


hr. 


l/wk 


$66,175 




Lavish variety show with great comic 


IN THE PARK 


Puppet (live) 


Children 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$3,250 




Bill Sears meets Calvin the Crow. Sir Geoffrey the Giraffe. 
Albert the Chipmunk. Magnolia the Ostrich in the park 


SAM LEVENSON 


Variety 


Family 


in 


min. 


1 wk 


$18,850 




Bright, fresh comic approach 


LIFE WITH LUIGI 


Situation 
Comedy 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$25,000 




Famous story of impact of America on Italian immigrant 


MAN OF THE WEEK 


Interview 


Family 


30 


nun 


l/wk 


$4,100 




A note-worthy nanc in the news is interviewed by a panel 
of news experts 


MR. 1. MAGINATION 


Drama 


Children 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$6,000 




A literary classic as seen through the eyes of a child 


GARRY MOORE 


Variety 


Family 


30 


min. 


, wk 


$27,500 
$2,750 for 


<A hr. 


Garry Moore with Durward Kirby. Denise Lor, Ken Car- 
son, and Howard Smith and his orchestra 


MORNING NEWS 


News 


Family 


15 


min. 


5/wk 


$6,500 
$1,450 for 


'/4 hr. 


Charles Collingwood and Dorothy Doan present the news 


QUIZ KIDS 


Quiz 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$5,900 




Brilliant youngsters answer almost any question tossed at 
them by Joe Kelly 


SONGS FOR SALE 


Variety 


Family 


1 


hr. 1 


/wk 


$24,500 




Amateur song-writers with Steve Allen presiding 


WHAT IN THE WORLD 


Panel Qui; 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$2,850 




Anthropologists identify objects from all parts of ttie 

Will III 


WHISTLING WIZARD 


Puppet 


Family 


30 


min, 


l/wk 


$5,600 




Bill and Cora Baird puppets in a fantasy 



Du Mont TV package availabilities 



TITLE 


TYPE 


APPEAL 




Tl 


ME 


PRICE 


TESTED 


EXPLANATION 


BATTLE OF THE AGES 


Variety 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 




yes 


Talent contest: show business vets vs. newcomers 


DOWN YOU GO 


Quiz 


Family 


ill 


min. 


l/wk 


$4,000 


yes 


Parlor game with prizes 


JOHNS HOPKINS SCIENCE REVIEW 


Discussion 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$2,500 


yes 


Scientific demonstrations 


LIFE BEGINS AT EIGHTY 


Forum 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$2,405 


yes 


Jokes, jests of another era recalled by octognarlans 


PET SHOP 


Animal 


Family 


ill 


min. 


l/wk 


$1,842 


yes 


Gail Compton and daughter present trained pets 


QUICK ON THE DRAW 


Quiz 


Family 


;u 


min. 


l/wk 


$2,300 


yes 


Cartoon, charades 


TAKE THE BREAK 


Disk jockey 


Family 


;u 


nun 


5/wk 


$1,616 


yes 


Don Russell and guests 


THE CINEMA THEATRE 


Drama 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$2,000 


yes 


TV films with feature Hollywood players 


THE AUTHOR MEETS THE 


CHITICS 


Forum 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$2,326 


yes 


Pro and con panel book review 


THEY STAND ACCUSED 


Drama 


Family 


1 


hr. 


l/wk 


$3,000 


yes 


Realistic courtroom drama 


THIS IS MUSIC 


Musical 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$4,895 


yes 


Musical presentation from swing to classical 


WHAT'S THE STORY 


Quiz 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$2,068 


yes 


Fast-moving newspaper game 


WOMEN'S CLUB 




Discussion 


Women 


15 


min. 


; wk 


Mi, a 


yes 


Interviews and discussions of interest to women 



NBC TV package availabilities 



TITLE 


TYPE 


APPEAL 


Tl 


ME 


PRICE 


TESTED 


EXPLANATION 


ALL S7AH P.EVUE 


Comedy 


Family 


60 min. every 
3rd week 




yes 


Comody shows rotating great comedy stars 


FRED ALLEN SHOW 


Comedy Quiz 


Family 


30 min. 


l/wk 




no 


Audience quiz with adlib comedy by Allen 


BOB AND RAY 


Comedy 


Family 


30 min. 


l/wk 




yes 


Comedy satire 


CAMEO THEATRE 


Drama 


Family 


30 min. 


l/wk 


$7,500 


yes 


Dramas produced-directed by Albert McCleery 


JUDY CANOVA 


Comedy 


Family 


30 m'n. 


l/wk 




no 


Situation comody (film) 


HOAGY CARMICHAEL 


Musical 


Family 








no 


Musical 


CHAMBER MUSIC SOCIETY 
OF LOWER BASIN STREET 


Musical 


Family 


30 min. 


1 wk 




no 


Dixieland music with high-brow narration 


THE CLOCK 


Drama 


Adult 


30 m'n. 


l/wk 


$9,500 


yes 


Mystery dramas built around element of time 



150 



SPONSOR 



\ 



Match 
thi 



is 



/\ 



market 

for 

Scratch! 










Here's a clear-cut case for: 

THE RICH DAYTON MARKET and WHIO's TV & AM COVERAGE 



Dayton Industry's average weekly 
pay check — $83.67. Highest in Ohio 
and one of the highest in the country. 

Payrolls in Dayton for the year 1951 
— $630,951,822. 

Retail sales for Dayton and Mont- 
gomery County — $475,000,000. For 
the past 18 months Dayton has been 
named as a "Preferred City."* 



c 



* SALES MANAGEMENT 
** HOOPER for April, 1952 
*** PULSE for May, 1952 



Number of families in WHIO's big 
TV and AM coverage area — 366,457. 

WHIO's share** of the total radio 
audience — 41.8%. This against Station 
A— 13.7%; Station B — 20.0%; Station 
C— 16.5% 

WHIO-TV's share*** of the top 15 
weekly television shows aired in this 
area — 11 of the top 15. The top multi- 
weekly show in this area is a WHIO- 
TV locally produced news program, 
showing a strong production staff. 



Pick yourself a market with 1,293,595 
prosperous prospects — and the one 
station that gives you top coverage 
of that market with both TV and AM. 
WHIO in Dayton is represented na- 
tionally by George P. Hollingbery. 

( 



■ 



OHIO 




WALLY COX SHOW 


Comedy 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$12,500 


no 


Situation comedy 


BARRIE CRAIG. INVESTIGATOR 


Drama 


Family 


30 


mln. 


l/wk 




no 


Private detective series with Bill Gargan 


JOAN DAVIS 


Comedy 


Family 


ill 


min. 


l/wk 




no 


Situation comedy (film) 


DUFFY'S TAVERN 


Comedy 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 




no 


Situation comedy (film) 


RALPH EDWARDS 


Variety 


Family 


ill 


min. 


l/wk 




yes 


Variety, quiz musical 


ETHEL AND ALBERT 


Comedy 


Family 


30 
15 


min. 
mln. 


l/wk 
or 
2/wk 


$10,500 
$9,000 


no 


Family life comedy (film) 


EUROPEAN VARIETIES 


Variety 


Family 


15 


min. 


5/wk 




no 


Series featuring European variety acts (film) 


FOREIGN LEGION 


Adventure 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 




no 


Adventures of foreign legion (film) 


GABBY HAYES 


Juvenile 


Family 


15 


mln. 


l/wk 




yes 


Children's show with cowboy films 


GARROWAY AT LARGE 


Variety 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$20,000 


yes 


Slick production variety show 


THE GOLDBERGS 


Comedy 
Drama 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$15,000 




Family situation comedy 


HOWDY DOODY 


Variety 


Juvenile 


several 
15 m 


n. segs. 




yes 


Children's variety show with comedy Alms 


INTERNATIONAL THEATRE 


Drama 


Adult 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$20,500 


no 


Doug Fa'rbanks. Jr. produces, hosts, occasionally stars in 
film drama 


IT'S A PROBLEM 


Panel 


Adult 


30 


min. 


l/wk 




no 


Discussion of vital family problems 


JUVENILE JURY 


Panel 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$6,500 


yes 


Children's panel quiz 


LIFE OF RILEY 


Comedy 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$22 IMili 


no 


Situation comedy (film) 


RUTH LYONS SHOW 


Variety 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 


$900 for '/ 4 hr 


yes 


Entertainment, audience participation and interviews 


MIDWESTERN HAYRIDE 


Variety 


Family 


30 
60 


min. 
min. 


l/wk 
l/wk 




no 


Folk music and acts 


MICKEY ROONEY 


Comedy 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 




no 


Situation comedy (film) 


TONY MINER PLAYHOUSE 


Drama 


Family 


60 


min. 


l/wk 


$35,500 


no 


Full-hour quality plays 


NATURE OF THINGS 


Science 


Family 


15 


min. 


l/wk 




yes 


Dr. Roy K. Marshall In simple science lectures 


ONE MAN'S FAMILY 


Drama 


Family 


30 min. 

alternate wks 




yes 


Family situation drama 


SILENT MEN 


Drama 


A, lull 


30 


min. 


1 wk 


$17,500 


no 


Stories of international intrigue (film) 


THOSE ENDEARING 
YOUNG CHARMS 


Drama 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 




yes 


Family situation series 


THREE 


Drama 


Adull 


30 


min. 


l/wk 




no 


Dramas involving three psrsons 


VICTORY AT SEA 


Documentary 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 




no 


Scries of naval warefare (film) 


WALTER O'KEEFE 


Quiz 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 




no 


Audience quiz 


WELCOME TRAVELERS 


Audience Parti( 


.Family 


30 


min. 


5/wk 




no 


Audience participation variety 


YOUTH WANTS TO KNOW 


Forum 


Family 


30 


min. 


l/wk 




yes 


Important persons Interviewed by the youth 



Ultra-high frequency 



Q. What role will UHF play in 
the post-freeze era? 

A. UHF is just like the present VHF 
television — only it's higher in frequen- 
cy. Engineers report UHF behaves in 
just about the same manner as VHF 
with negligible differences in the dis- 
tance signals travel and in signal- 
strength characteristics. Set manufac- 
turers, too, say they will have no difli- 
culty in making converter units for 
adding UHF reception to present VHF 
sets; or, in producing sets with the 
UHF built in. (Converters will cost 
$25 and up, it's said.) Accordingly, 
the distinction between UHF and VHF 
television will eventually cease to exist. 
You won't stop to think when you buy 
a station "this one is UHF, the other 
VHF." You won't, that is, except in 
present multi-station markets where 



there is now a well developed VHF 
audience. In such markets, the UHF 
stations will have a tough time gaining 
a foothold, perhaps struggling along 
a6 the TV equivalent of FM. These 
stations will have to put something 
special on the air to cause viewers who 
can already receive three to four or 
more stations to buy converters for 
their sets. 

Eventually, however, as today's sets 
are replaced by new ones with built- 
in UHF, the distinctions even in these 
present multi-station markets will van- 
ish. Ten or more years from now, 
you'll probably be tagged an oldtimer 
in the business if you're still talking 
about TV stations in terms of whether 
they are UHF or VHF. 



Q. Is the public being prepared 
for UHF? 

A. Publicity as well as advertising 



are laying the groundwork for sale of 
UHF stations. RCA, for example, 
which will eventually have additional 
UHF convertors in present VHF areas 
highlighted UHF in a recent consumer 
magazine ad which told how it had 
spent $3,000,000 to study UHF alone. 
The ad explained that RCA has been 
operating an experimental UHF sta- 
tion near Bridgeport, Conn. It called 
UHF the "key to nationwide TV cov- 
erage." explaining that it "Provides 70 
new channels for about 1,500 new sta- 
tions." 

Zenith has long been telling the pub- 
lic that its sets are easily converted for 
I II F with the mere addition of a new 
tuner strip. The firm even has card- 
board models of its tuner placed in 
the new tuning strip can be added. 
Other manufacturers as well stress 
easy conversion in their consumer ad- 
vertising of television sets. 



152 



SPONSOR 



NBC's MEN IN THE NEWS: Kaltenborn 




rhoto>,-raph by RAI.rn STKINKR 



"The situation is tragic— but not serious." 



H. V. Kaltenborn has been estimat- 
ing serious situations since the 
Spanish-American War, in which he 
was a soldier-correspondent. 
Since then he has spent twenty 
years in the newspaper business 
and thirty years as a radio 
commentator. 

In a career which could fill several 
books (and has), Mr. Kaltenborn 
has broadcast interviews with 
Hitler, Mussolini, Ghandi, and 



Chiang Kai-Shek, has been captured 
by Chinese bandits and in his 
coverage of the Spanish Civil War 
was the first to broadcast from the 
scene of battle. 

Every Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 
H. V. Kaltenborn's clipped speech 
and famed pronunciation of "Russia" 
are heard on Pure Oil News Time, 
sponsored by the Pure Oil Company. 
And along with the rest of NBC's 
distinguished company of newsmen, 



Mr. Kaltenborn is currently reporting 
on both radio and television the 
biggest political news since 1932. 

Kaltenborn, the dean of radio news 
commentators, is another reason why 
most people hear the news first and 
hear more of it from NBC. 



JNr>U tail in and television, 

a service of Radio Corporation of America 



14 JULY 1952 



153 



"SUCCESS STORY" 

19th ANNUAL PERFORMANCE 

starring 

ORIGINAL CAST 

* H. V. Holmes, president of S. C. 
Holmes & Sons, clothiers, Tulsa, Okla- 
homa. 

* R. P. (Bud) Akin, senior account execu- 
tive, the KTUL Sales Staff. 




This oft-repeated scene has become a tradition 
between Clothier H. V. Holmes and KTUL Ac- 
count Executive R. P. (Bud) Akin. For the 19th 
consecutive year, these two men have swapped 
signatures on KTUL advertising contracts. The 
satisfaction is obviously mutual. 



• KTUL has MORE LOCAL PROGRAM SPONSORS than ALL OTHER TULSA 
network radio stations COMBINED. 

• LOCAL ACCEPTANCE is the "CRASS ROOTS" TEST of a Radio Stations 
SELLING POWER! 

• Get the KTUL story from your nearest AVERY-KNODEL, Inc., office. 




RADIO 

CBS Radio Network 



JOHN ESAU — Vice President — General Manager 



AFFILIATED with KFPW, FORT SMITH, Ark., and KOMA, OKLAHOMA CITY 




Easier to get into now 

Spot television, having taken off like a hopped-up rocket from 
a standing start just four short years ago, is beginning to slow 
up now, and the main advertising patterns are beginning to 
emerge. But, advertisers considering spot TV, whether veter- 
ans or newcomers, have many questions unanswered for 
fall, 1952. 

"What's going to happen to spot TV rates?" "What avail- 
abilities are being offered?" "Should I use a network pro- 
gram or a spot TV film campaign?" These are just a few 
of the posers asked by clients and ad agencies today, and 
which are answered here in sponsor's Fall Facts section on 
spot video. 

Much progress has been made in the past year in arriving 
at more "standardized" methods of procedure in spot TV, 
involving everything from commercial station identifications 
to the ordering of television film programs and commercials. 
These, too, are covered in this section, as witness the index 
at right. 

The trends in local-level TV programing, the develop- 
ment of participation programs, late-night film shows, the 
situation concerning TV station merchandising, and the gen- 
eral business outlook for fall — these are all to be found in 
this section. 

With national TV network prices forcing many TV adver- 
tisers to shift dollars to TV spot campaigns, with TV station 
availabilities still tight, and with new trends forming in TV 
rates, advertisers need these dollars-and-cents facts. 

14 JULY 1952 



Spot TV availabilities 156 

Spot TV rates 156 

Business outlook 157 

Spot TV results 160 

Spot TV fundamentals 162 

Programing' 162 

Film programing' 164 

Standardisation 164 

Merchandising' 166 

lop agencies and clients 1 66 

155 




Meetings between agencies and reps are smoothing out some of spot TV S problems like 

Susan Mumford (white hat), Anne Wright, "Red" Neubert, Bill Schneider Dc 
McClure, Irwin Segelstein, Jack Brooke, Herb Leder, Russ Raycroft Dave Gud. 



NARTSR clinic above, in which reps and agencies discussed topics such as the 
lack of standardization of commercial station "I.D." requirements, have pro- 
duced new rules, easing of TV problems. Seen above clockwise starting with 



, irwin Je gelstein, Jack BrooKe, ner D Leaer, ixu« .vaV 
brod, John Freese, Lloyd Griffin, James Neal, Fred Raphael, Ted Grunewal 



Availabilities 



Q. How tight will good spot TV 
availabilities be this fall? 

A. For the first year in several sea- 
sons of booming spot TV sales, good 
spot availabilities are showing up. The 
head of one agency's TV timebuying 
functions told sponsor: "The whole 
situation is beginning to loosen. Sta- 
tion reps who had nothing to offer us 
last vear are beginning to make real 
sales pitches. Many TV stations have 
opened up marginal hours and day- 
time TV faster than advertisers were 
buying, making more time available. 
Other stations report that several TV 
spot advertisers are beginning to hold 
back in TV spending, either to cover 
other media increases or to go back 
to spot radio." 

Generally speaking, the choicest time 
slots and participations, and the best- 
rated local shows in spot TV are still 

156 



hard to buy. especially in the major 
TV markets. However, there's a grow- 
ing number of availabilities that are 
not as well-rated, but aren't as expen- 
sive. The advertiser who intends to 
buy a large spot TV campaign this 
fall will find that there are more selec- 
tions than there were last year. 

The differential between what a sta- 
tion makes from a network program 
and to what it gets from a spot pro- 
gram — from 25c to 45c more on the 
dollar via spot — goes a long way to- 
ward making stations more prone to 
clear good time for spot TV adver- 
tisers. This differential also helps if 
a sponsor is seeking the added values 
of publicity, promotional pushes, and 
point-of-sale merchandising. 

More of a programing trend, but 
worth mentioning here, is the fact that 
TV stations will be offering more syn- 
dicated film shows and feature film 
packages than ever before. Industry 
estimates are for a whopping $20,000.- 



000 to be spent to produce video films 
this season, with a large percentage of 
these films winding up as part of local- 
level packages. Also, stations plan to 
offer more network TV co-op shows 
through their reps for national spot 
sponsorship. 



Rate outlook 



Q. Will spot TV rates continue 
upward this fall? 

A. Just as spot TV's total billings 
have jumped from practically nothing 
to the $65,000,000 brackets in the 
past four years, spot TV rates have also 
climbed as more TV sets have entered 
TV markets. 

However, the trend is now towards a 
slow-down in rate increases, according 
to a survey of TV station reps by spon- 
sor. Set sales in all markets are con- 
tinuing, but when viewed by individ- 

SPONSOR 



nnouncing 

for the 
first time: 



of video and audio 
requirements for 

10-SECOND 

SHARED IDENTIFICATIONS 

on all 8 Television Stations 
represented by 



NBC 

SPOT 

SALES 



S i!C 






WNBT 

WNBQ 

KNBH 

WPTZ 

WBZ-TV 

WNBK 

WNBW 

WRGB 



New York 
Chicago 
Los Angeles 
Philadelphia 

Boston 

Cleveland 

Washington 

Schenectady- 

Albany-Troy 



standardization of f.D.'s 

firm to fall 



i;irst station rep firm to fall in line with recommendations of groups, such 
which included rep firms ranging from NBC Spot Sales to Free & Peters 
hompson to William Esty) was NBC Spot Sales wh'ch has adopted uniform "I.D.' commercia 



one shown 
agencies from J. 



at left 
Walter 
standards 



ual markets or on the national scale, 
the sales graphs are beginning to level 
off into plateaus in which gaps are 
being filled. And, a large percentage of 
the business is replacements or secon- 
dary TV sets. 

The effect of this on rates — which 
have been held to a reasonable balance 
between TV homes and TV station 
rates, as witness the Katz Agency chart 
on page 180 — has been to stabilize 
them, after a series of dizzy upward 
spirals. Before last fall, stations and 
reps usually told sponsors they could 
expect rate increases anywhere from 
10% to 25% in most markets, with a 
six-month rate protection at best. 

This fall, the outlook is for 52-week 
rate guarantees in most cases, with 
only a few here-and-there spot TV rate 
increases anticipated, few of them in 
the larger video markets. 

Rate changes, when they do occur, 
are expected to run in reverse to spot 
radio changes; daytime rates will be 

14 JULY 1952 



constant, with more selling of big-dis- 
count packages of slots. Nighttime 
rates, particularly in interconnected 
cities in the East and Midwest, may go 
up in a few cases, where they involve 
adjacencies in prime evening hours 
next to high-rated network shows. 



Few I \ stations an expected t<> \>< 
so hard-pul Foi business that they have 
to make under-the-counter deals, as is 
taking place lure and there in • 
radio. However, there have been in- 
stances oi T\ stations making 
on the harder-to-sell late-evening peri- 
ods or in the over-five station markets. 

■Business outlook 



Q. How does spot TV business 
shape up for fall? 

A. In the opinion of most station reps 
and agen< ies contacted b\ SPONSOR, 
spot TV business this fall will be good 
— but not much better than last fall. 
After zooming from a total of some 
76 national-regional TV spot advertis- 
ers back in June 1948 to a total of 
around 1,300 today (according to 
N. C. Rorabaugh), the zoom is level- 
ing off into a gentle climb. 

"We're beginning to see the end of 
TV's boom growth, as regards the 
number of spot advertisers," a station 
rep firm which represents over half a 
dozen TV outlets told sponsor. "Our 
salesmen have to be on their toes, and 
our stations have to offer everything 
from sound point-of-sale merchandis- 
ing to 52-week rate guarantees to gel 
new spot TV business." 

This, however, was the over-all con- 
census: Almost all of last fall's leading 
TV spot advertisers will be using the 
medium this fall, particularly those 
who hold valuable time franchises. A 
few new faces will be around, primar- 
ily those advertisers who are launch- 
ing new products or intensifving their 
sales drives, such as the king-sized 
Chesterfield and the chlorophyll drug 
and cosmetic products. 

{Please In in In page l()2l 



Local live shows score high ral 


ings 


Program 


Station 


Day A Time Rating Shar* 


SIDEWALK INTERVIEWS 


WNMC-TV 
1 Station 


! 

Mon.t4Sp.rn. 28. 93.3 1 


THE STORM 


WKRC-TV 

3 Stations 


! 

To... 10:30 p. m. 15.8 31.9 3 


NEWS REPORTER 


WXtl 
3 Stations 


Mon.-M. 11 p.m. 14.4 40.0 2 


SOONER SHINDIG 


WKT-TV 
1 Station 


.ho,... p.m. 62.0 100.03 


LOU'S LAIR 


KMTV 
2 Station. 


Mon.-Frl. 5 p.m. 7.2 40. 0< 


WRESTLING 


KPIX 
3 Station. 


Tiin.9p.ni. 19.4 37.3 ! 



157 



Our Mr. S 
has just been 
where you're 
going 




You can make an expedition out of finding the 
right TV spots. But the easiesl wa\ —and the best- 
is to talk with our Mr. S. 

For he travels farther than anyone to keep up 
with seven of your top markets. And does it more 
frequently, too. 

/// the last six months, for instance, every one 
of our account men has made at least one complete 
tour of all seven markets. 

Our Mr. S. has brought back the most first-hand 
facts on these markets you'll find in captivity. 
He has an on-the-spot perspective which no one else 
can give you. 

And when he recommends a TV spot, you can he 
sure that your product will be in the right place at 
the right time. 

You'll climb the highest sales curve with Mr. S. 
as your guide. When you plan your next campaign, 
he'd be pleased to help you. 

CBS TELEVISION SPOT SALES 

Representing WCBS-TV, New York ; WCAU-TV, Philadelphia : 
WTOP-TV, Washington; WBTV, Charlotte; WAFM-TV, Birmingham 

KSL-TV, Salt Lake City; and KNXT, I.os Angeles 




REDUCING MACHINES 


CORSAGES 


SPONSOR: Modern House AGENCY: Richard Meltzer 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Modern House spent $400 
while participating in Les Malloy's Preview Party. The 
shou failures a full-length feature movie shown in a 
"home-projector" settling by Les and his wife. In one 
month of promoting Relaxacizor. a figure control ma- 
chine. Modern Home sold 70 units. This represents, at 
better than $150 a unit, over $11,850 in sales against the 
$400 TV cost. 

KGO-TV, San Francisco PROGRAM: Les Malloy's 

Preview Party 


SPONSOR: Lubin & Smalley AGENCY: Rothman & Gibbons 
CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Lubin & Smalley are one 
of the largest florists in Pittsburgh. In advance of Moth- 
er s Day they ran two live announcements to promote the 
sending of corsages. After the two announcements, they 
report the phone rang continuously and business was up 
200% over the best of previous years. Lubin & Smalley 
realized returns of many hundreds of dollars on an ex- 
penditure of about $200. 

WDTV, Pittsburgh PROGRAM: Announcements 




CANDY SAMPLES 






TV 

results 




SPONSOR: Hupper's Candy Store AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: H upper wanted to interest 
new customers in their candies. To do so, they bought 
a weekly participation in Teleshopper, a window shop- 
ping, chatty type of show on 1 :45 p.m. Wednesdays. After 
three weeks Hupper offered a sample box of candy. With- 
in two days 200 cards came in. Participation: $15 a week. 

WGAL-TV. Lancaster PROGRAM: Teleshopper 

4 




BREAD 


FROST ELIMINATOR 


SPONSOR: Yost Baking Co. AGENCY: Direct 

1 \PSULE CASE HISTORY: This Johnstown firm ran a 
series of one-minute announcements at 6:59 p.m. To test 
TV effectiveness fully, all other media were dropped. The 
campaign was designed to specifically promote Holly- 
wood bread, a reducing aid distributed by the company. 
After 10 weeks at $225. bread sales were up 48% or an 
increase in gross returns of several thousand dollars. 

WJAC-TV, Johnstown PROGRAM: Announcements 


SPONSOR: Formular X-l \GKNCY: Anastasion 
CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The product is a fog and 
frost-eliminating compound for windshields. To remind 
viewers of its values, Formular X-l chose an appropriate 
time for its demonstration — directly preceding a weather 
forecast show, Something's In The Wind. At a cost of 
$82.50. one 6:55 p.m. announcement rang up 353 cash 
orders for one or more packages at $1 per package. 

KSL-TV, Salt Lake City PROGRAM: Announcement 


HAIR CURLERS 


DINNERWARE 

■ 


SPONSOR: Carlton Curlers AGENCY: Umland & Co. 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Carlton demonstrated and 
displayed his $1 curlers on three Sunday Del Courtney 
participations. After the first $100 commercial this was 
the reaction: the following Monday 260 letters and or- 
ders came in; Tuesday, 80 more; Wednesday, 140 more. 
Besides, Carlton realized $90 worth of hair dressing busi- 
ness. Total gross: $570 from the first participation with 
the succeeding two equally successful. 

KPIX, San Francisco PROGRAM: Del Courtney Show 


i 

SPONSOR: Thrift House AGENCY: Product Services 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY : This past May Thrift House 
spent $11,900 for participations in the Eleventh Hour 
Theatre and various other WNBT daytime shows. The 
products advertised were a gold and silver dinnenvare 
ensemble, and Thrift House waterless cookware for 
$49.90. Resulting sales for the month totaled approxi- 
mately $140,000 and client has signed a 52-week contract 
for 1952-53 for a minimum $150,000 expenditure. 

WNBT, New York PROGRAM: Eleventh Hour Theatre 



ears 




of G 



rowing 



r 



Z^J Z±J 



AM • FM 



TV 




WILMINGTON, DELAWARE 

19?2 marks for WDEL, three decades of broadcast opcra= 
tion — thirty years o\ growing with the many vigorous,, 
expanding communities in its listening and viewing area. 



Established in 1922, WDEL was Delaware's first station. 
In 1947, it broadened its services to bring frequency modu- 
lation to its listeners. And three years ago, in 1949, it 
pioneered the State's first television station. Today, WDEL 
is Delaware's only three-way broadcast operation. 

On the occasion of its thirtieth birthday, WDEL restates its 
past and future plans and philosophy of operation. These 
are to improve constantly its programming and tech- 
nical facilities and to serve always the best interests 
of the people in its area — listeners, viewers and 
advertisers. 

Represented by 

ROBERT MEEKER ASSOCIATES 

NEW YORK CHICAGO LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO 



14 JULY 1952 



161 



Thus, the leading categories of spot 
TV advertisers — foods, beer and wine, 
tobacco products, drugs and toiletries, 
household appliances, jewelry, and pe- 
troleum products — will be using the 
medium this fall, in virtually the same 
volume as a year ago. In a few cases — 
such as the slowly-increasing TV cam- 
paigns of Bulova Watch Company, the 
volume may be higher. 



Spot fundamentals 

Q. What precisely is spot tele- 
vision? 

A. Since 65% of the country's TV 
markets are still one-station markets, 
there's less of a clear-cut distinction be- 
tween network TV and spot TV than 
there is between the radio counter- 
parts. When network time is exceed- 
ingly hard to clear in TV, and a station 
list for an advertiser may be 75% 
"kine" markets, about the only conti- 
nuity that's left is in the program. 
Hours and time slots can vary as wide- 
ly in network TV as they do in the 
general province of spot broadcasting. 

However, this definition given last 
year by sponsor still fills the bill: 

"Spot TV can be considered as mar- 
ket-by-market buying of TV time or 
programs, announcements, participa- 
tions and station breaks that do not 
involve network facilities or go through 
network sales channels, and which op- 
erate at the local market level." 

As yet, TV has not grown to the 
point where distinct regional TV webs 
are developing. This may come some- 
time in the future, when all of the pos- 
sible TV markets are being covered by 
video outlets, and "total U.S." costs are 
prohibitive. Today it's either a na- 
tional network campaign or a spot TV 
campaign that's being aired, with no 
great range of activity in between. 

Q. What special attractions does 
spot TV have to advertisers? 

A. Spot TV is the most flexible form 
of national TV advertising. Advertis- 
ers can move into spot TV with small, 
medium, or large budgets, and still be 
able to have worthwhile campaigns. 
Newcomers to TV advertising find it 
particularly useful as an "experimen- 
tal" medium, to try out commercial 
techniques and to determine if the 
sight-and-sound values of TV are worth 



the difference in advertising impact and 
price over spot radio or a particular 
product. 

As one agency man put it to spon- 
sor: "In our TV recommendations to 
clients, this flexibility of spot TV is 
often brought out. This is a very im- 
portant point, since 41 of the nation's 
TV markets are still one-station mar- 
kets, and network TV time is still 
tough to clear. This flexibility is even 
more important a factor in choosing 
TV spot than in selecting radio spot, 
since radio networks today will do 
handsprings to make themselves flexible 
and to fit into all kinds of campaigns." 

In addition, spot has certain other 
advantages which look attractive to 
main purchasers. Sponsors who have 
bought film packages, or who have put 
their shows on film with an eye to us- 
ing the films eventually in new TV 
areas as they open, find spot TV a 
method of amortizing film costs over a 
long period of time. Also, by produc- 
ing I or supervising ) programs on film, 
agencies and advertisers can retain 
greater control of the content. 

From the viewpoint of TV stations, 
many of whom (like Pittsburgh's 
WDTV. for instance) are in the driv- 
er's seat because they are the one TV 
station in a large city, spot TV is 
looked upon more lovingly than net- 
work TV. Stations realize, of course, 
that network TV's stars and shows are 
what builds viewing and boosts the 
value of adjacencies. But. their "take 
on a spot deal may be 550 to 700 out 
of the advertising dollar; in network 
TV the same deal might bring them 
only 300. Therefore, stations promote, 
merchandise, and cooperate with spot 
advertisers to an extent not always 
seen in their handling of network ac- 
counts. 

Q. Who can be reached by adver- 
tisers using spot TV? 

A. Spot video's potential "circula- 
tion" is the same as that of all televi- 
sion, and the figures on TV areas, set 
counts and viewing shown in sponsor's 
TV Basics section apply. 

Apart from the use of a standardized 
program approach, such as spot TV 
films, the buying of spot TV calls for 
judicious timebuying at the agency lev- 
el. Good spots are still hard to come 
by, and it takes skill to work oul a 
'.•(kmI schedule thai will reach the great- 
est amount of TV viewers in which the 
advertiser is interested. 



Broadly speaking, the advertiser's 
target in spot TV is the four out of 10 
U. S. homes that are TV-equipped. 



Programing 

Q. Are there any new trends or 
unusual advertising buys in spot 
TV programing? 

A. Here are two of the major trends 
in local-level TV spot programing,, as 
reported to SPONSOR by station reps 
and local program officials: 

1. Daytime participation shows — 
Network facilities in TV di'dn't grow 
as fast as they did in radio and many 
TV stations found they had to impro- 
vise locally when TV was just starting. 
Today, many of those off-the-cuff shows 
have grown into well-rated local par- 
ticipation shows, with loyal daytime 
followkigs and a long list of participat- 
ing national advertisers. 

Such shows as Tommy Reynolds 
Show on KEYL-TV, San Antonio; 
Pony Express, WFIL-TV, Philadel- 
phia: Smokey Rogers General Store, 
KFMB-TV, San Diego: Jeans Kitchen 
Fair, WBNS-TV, Columbus. Ohio; 
Chef Cardini Show, on KGO-TV, San 
Francisco; Al Jarvis on KECA-TV, 
Los Angeles; the wake-up telecasts of 
Warren Michael Kelly in the early 
mornings on WX\Z-TV. Detroit; 
Clyde McLean s Weather Man on 
WBTV. Charlotte; the morning pot- 
pourri of gags, Brent Gunts Show, on 
WBAL-TV, Baltimore; Stop! Look V 
Cook! on WNBF-TV. Binghampton, 
N. Y.; Money Talks, on WMBR-TV, 
Jacksonville. Fla.; and the Nancy 
Craig Show on WJZ-TV are typical of 
the local daytime and afternoon par- 
ticipation shows which have already 
brought good results at low costs to 
spot buyers. 

Timebuyers point out that the sta- 
tions which produce these participa- 
tion shows net more money from them, 
generally, than they do from network 
shows. Hence they are more likely to 
cooperate with participating advertis- 
ers with merchandising tie-ins and pro- 
motional backing. 

2. Late-night film shows — As spon- 
sor reported in its 21 April 1952 issue 
("Does late-night TV pay off?"), some 
85' , of U.S. television stations now 
have programs "up to midnight and 
beyond." Even thing from frozen 



162 



SPONSOR 



MUSIC and SPORTS 



TEAM UP 
in the NEW 



Scufet Setce<i. , . 




. . . thrilling eye-witness accounts of dramatic action us the) 
happened on (In* baseball diamond — in the prize ring — on tin* 
gridiron — and elsewhere — to tin* great, the near-great, and the 
unknow n> who played the game and played to win — often when 
there was more at stake than just the game itself. 

A complete script package featuring your 
own talent with records . . . available three 
times weekly as a 15-minute presentation. 

YOU'RE SAFE IN USING BMI CONTINUITY 



TEEN AGE BOOK PARADE 

Sparkling and appealing 15-minute scripts 
available on a three times weekly schedule 
. . . Brings to your audience a series of dis- 
tinguished reviews by America's outstanding 
book critics. Slanted to the teen-ager but 
captures the adult as well. 

ACCORDING TO THE RECORD 

Timely facts about the unusual, with musical 
cues that fit neatly into a dynamic 5-minute 
show. Available seven times per week for 
52 weeks. Now in its 8th successful year. 



YOUR CONCERT HALL 

The finest in concert music presented as a 
series of full-hour programs, three times 
weekly. Authoritative scripts which make 
concert music popular music. Supplemented 
by "TODAY IN MUSIC"- dates and facts 
about the important music events of the 
month. 

SPECIAL EVENT SCRIPTS 

Complete half-hour programs based on 
periodic national events . . . timely and ef- 
fective supplements to the "According to the 
Record" series. 



BMI CONTINUITIES are a regular service to BMI- 
licensees at no cost. They are designed as practical 
programs and may be used as commercial or sustain- 
ing features. 

TO INSURE your receiving "STORIES FROM THE 
SPORTS RECORD" and other BMI scripts regularly, 
simply send your request to BMI's Continuity Department. 



Broadcast Music, Inc. 

580 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 36, N. Y. 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD • TORONTO • MONTREAL 



14 JULY 1952 



163 



orange juke to folding beds has been 
sold successfully, usually through lo- 
cal feature-film packages. Only the 
kids are missing from audiences. 

Here are just a few of the late-night 
film shows open to advertisers on a 
participating basis: 

The Late Show and Late Late Show 
of WCBS-TV, New York; Nite Owl 
Theatre, on VAX EL. Cleveland; Sound 
Stage Four on WTCN-TV, Minneap- 
olis; Movie> ill Midnight on WTMJ- 
TV, Milwaukee I a station which also 
telecasts late-night kinescopes of net- 
work shows to reach defense workers) ; 
Late Evening Movies on WDSU-TV, 
New Orleans; Jackson s Theatre on 
KTTV, Los Angeles ; Clover Club Date 
(in conjunction with a local night club, 
a la Barry Gray) on WTVJ, Miami; 
and Movies 'Til Midnight, on Balti- 
more's WAAM. 

Sponsors who think that, outside of 
New York, the country retires around 
10 o'clock are in for a great surprise. 
Nielsen TV sets-in-use figures for Jan- 
uary 1952 in the U. S. showed an aver- 
age of 14.3 for the period of 11 to 
midnight, compared with 10.5 for the 
same month in 1951. Expectations for 
fall are even better, since most stations 
in one-station and two-station markets 
have been scheduling programs I in- 
cluding network kinescopes) later and 
later at night. Costs are low, and 
costs-per- 1,000 homes reached are com- 
parable to those of the best daytime TV 
shows. 



Film programing 



Q. What's the trend for fall in 
spot film programing? 

A. Multi-market spot TV campaigns, 
using film programs, are on the in- 
crease. In fact, this is as significant a 
TV trend, in the eyes of both adver- 
tisers and agencies, as merchandising 
is in spot radio. 

By industry estimates, at least two 
or three years will pass before there 
are enough TV stations to (a) give 
networks full-time affiliates in all of the 
key video markels, and (b) until the 
problems of clearing live TV network 
time begins to ease, and the number 
of kine stations in station lists begins 
lo drop. 

Meanwhile, reps and stations are 
promoting the values of spot TV film 



programing to national advertisers as 
spot has never been promoted before. 
So successful has this campaign been 
that agencies handling network shows 
have often had to put emissaries on the 
road to help cement their relationships 
with TV stations who view network 
shows as "30-cents-on-the-dollar deals." 
(That is. the station's share of the rate 
paid to the network by the advertiser 
comes to 30%.) 

Needless to say, the sales target for 
the reps and stations promoting this 
method of TV advertising is not simply 
a list of current network clients. Many 
clients sponsor package shows (ex- 
amples : CBS TV's Suspense, NBC TV's 
Kate Smith, DuMont's Captain Video) 
which are firmly tied to the network 
by virtue of being a "house package" 
or through iron-clad contracts with 
producers. These programs, which con- 
stitute over 40% of TV's major vehi- 
cles, are never likely to "go spot." 

But. among the clients who sponsor 
and the agencies who handle the re- 
maining shows, sponsor learned that 
there is growing activity and interest 
in the idea of filming these programs, 
then placing them on a spot basis. 

Q. What are some of the leading 
reasons why sponsors are using 
multi-market film program cam- 
paigns in spot TV? 

A. There are several good arguments 
for the use of film programing, placed 
on a market-by-market basis, as op- 
posed to a straight network program 
deal. The Katz Agency, Inc. (station 
reps) lists a few of the more important 
ones as being: 

1. Ratings: "Based on Pulse aver- 
ages (for N. Y. and L. A., before the 
cable went through I the kine rating is 
just a little more than a third of the 
live rating. An audience loss of two- 
thirds is the price the network adver- 
tiser pays when, to get any decent kind 
of coverage, he has to resort to de- 
layed kinescope recordings." 

2. Market choice: States Katz Agen- 
cy: "On spot TV you select as many or 
as few markets as your budget or sales 
strategy dictates." This is usually a 
matter of small concern to the adver- 
tiser with a huge budget who wants the 
utmost in a station list. But, for the 
medium-budget or small-budget adver- 
tiser who's faced with bin inii minimum 
networks that can \ar\ from about 20 
stations to about 40 outlets, spot's 
flexibililx looks inrreasin<d\ attractive. 



Adds Katz: "If you are on the net- 
work, and the network's affiliate in a 
multiple-station market can't deliver 
satisfactory time, then you're out of the 
market — no matter how important it 
is to you. As a spot program adver- 
tiser you can, in these markets, cross 
network lines for the stations which 
offer the best buy." 

3. General costs: Putting a show on 
film, which gives the advertiser better 
quality, fewer fluffs and greater scope, 
is not inexpensive. Costs run all over 
the lot, with producers hesitating to 
give off-the-cuff differentials, sponsor 
estimates that to do the "average" live 
TV show on film and then distribute it 
will cost anywhere from 15% to 40% 
more, depending on show type. How- 
ever, a good bit of this is balanced out 
by the fact that buying the same sta- 
tion time, through spot channels rather 
than network sales offices, can cost less. 
Katz has figured out that an evening 
half-hour on 39 NBC TV affiliates and 
stations will cost some 19% less when 
bought on a spot basis than when it's 
bought through NBC TV, for instance. 

4. Amortizing: There's a healthv 
outlook for advertisers in rerunning 
their film programs in new TV mar- 
kets, or in reselling them for "second 
runs" in markets already used. This, 
however, is not a gravy train; there 
are many problems to be solved, many 
deals to be made, and a lot of paper- 
work involved before a sponsor's film 
show begins to pay dividends. 



Standardization 

Q. What's being done to "stan- 
dardize" and simplify the prob- 
lems of spot TV? 

A. In the early days of spot TV, 
building schedules and planning cam- 
paigns was often as difficult as ship- 
ping a freight car from one end of the 
country to the other in the days before 
track widths were standardized. Today, 
although many problems of "stand- 
ardization" of TV coverage figures, 
equipment, techniques. s< ript foi mats 
remain to be solved, there is progress. 

Here are just a few of the more im- 
portant industry developments which 
have eased headaches of buyers and 
sellers in spot television : 

1. Film problems — With the advent 
of TV, many agencies found that they 
were suddenlv in the film business, not 



164 



SPONSOR 



WHEN YOU ADVERTISE 

on KDYL and KDYL-TV! 




HERE'S WHAT ONE 
ADVERTISER DID, USING 
KDYL EXCLUSIVELY ... A 
300% INCREASE IN VOLUME 




THIS YEAR OVER 
LAST! 




~ iy m* 



And this is only one of a host of 
satisfied sponsors who have found 
that it pays to include KDYL and 
KDYL-TV in their advertising plans. 

The reason KDYL and KDYL-TV pay 
off in results? 



KDYL and KDYL-TV Salt Lake City are leaders 
in the heart of a BILLION DOLLAR MARKET! 



Income payments to Utah individuals in 1951 
totaled over $1 billion— the greatest year in Utah's 
historyl 

Production of IRON and STEEL was greater in 1951 
than in any previous year. 

EMPLOYMENT was at an all-time high. 



• Utah's PETROLEUM REFINING industry experienced 
its greatest year in 1951. 

• More ELECTRIC POWER was utilized in Utah in 
1951 than in any prior year. 

• CASH FARM INCOME was greater than in any 
previous year. 



KDYL and KDYL-TV can help you "cash in" on this tremendous Utah 
prosperity. These radio and television pioneers— both NBC affiliates- 
offer you what it takes in programming, audience, merchandising and 
showmanship to get your share in this booming, growing market. 



KDYL 



5,000 WATTS 

first In 

Showmanship 

National Representative: 

John Blair A Co. 



NBC for UTAH 



KDYL-TV 



CHANNEL 4 

first In the 

/Mountain Wmst 

National Representative: 

Blair-TV, Inc. 



14 JULY 1952 



165 



as interested spectators but with the 
heavy responsibility of executive pro- 
ducers. They just didn't speak the 
language of the film business; film pro- 
ducers, too. weren't used to the terms 
and problems of advertising agencies. 

Much pioneer work has been done 
bv the American Television Society in 
smoothing out the rough spots in gen- 
eral relationships between ad agencies 
and film producers. (See "Blueprint 
for agency-film maker teamwork. 
sponsor. 5 May 1952, page 36.) Now. 
even agencies with limited experience 
in film work can submit to a producer 
all the information he'll need as the 
basis of an accurate bid or cost esti- 
mate, meanwhile having a clear-cut 
idea of where responsibilities start and 
stop. 

It's been said of the ATS work in 
this field that "a mutual understanding 
of their individual problems should 
lead to more efficient operation, low- 
ered costs, and a film commercial of 
superior effectiveness." 

2. Standardized TV "l.D.'s" — An- 
other problem in which the ATS has 
had a hand, along with NARTSR. has 
been the question of standardized 
audio and video requirements for com- 
mercial "station identification" an- 
nouncements. These eight-second and 
10-second announcements have proved 
to be valuable commercial vehicles, 
particularly as "'reminder" advertising, 
for products ranging from Parliament 
Cigarettes to Red Devil Paints. 

Until recently, however, the sponsor 
who wanted to make a single 16-mm 
film or slide series to be used in a wide- 
spread campaign of "I.D." announce- 
ments was out of luck. Some stations 
had their miniature identifications on 
the upper left-hand side of the screen : 
some had them on the right. Open- 
ings, closings, techniques, and type of 
equipment varied considerably, and 
meant extra artwork for agencies. 

Now, following the recommendations 
of ad agencies and NARTSR, NBC 
Spot Sales has set the pace in stand- 
ardizing "I.D." commercials on the 
eight TV stations it represents. Other 
reps, such as Katz. Blair-TV. and CBS 
Spot TV Sales have indicated to spon- 
sor that they will soon follow NBC's 
example in adopting uniform stand- 
ards. 

Most likely possibility for fall: Be- 
fore the end of 1952, most of the coun- 
try's TV stations will have standard- 
ized their commercial I.D. slides so 



that 75% of the screen is available for 
the commercial I trademark, slogan, 
picture I with the upper right-hand 
quarter left for the station's identifica- 
tion. A standard format for the audio, 
parallelling that of NBC Spot Sales, is 
also expected. 

3. Standardized coverage data — 
Few sponsors, in TV's short-pants days, 
questioned the engineers' definition of 
TV coverage, which was "line of sight. 
or about 50 miles." Timebuyers drew 
neat circles around TV towers, and 
said "That's it. boys." Due to various 
atmospheric conditions, geographical 
variations. and economic circum- 
stances. TV coverage has proved to be 
quite different from the simple 50-mile 
circles. Outlying towns have put up 
giant "community antennas," which 
have added hundreds of families to 
what was felt to be the limits of cover- 
age. Even isolated farmers have put 
up towers that look like aircraft bea- 
cons as far out as 100 miles from 
video stations. At the same time, there 
are sections of cities and nearby towns 
where video reception is physically im- 
possible, and these will have to be 
dropped from "coverage." 

Due to clarify the situation this fall 
will be the nationwide coverage and 
circulation reports from Standard 
Audience Measurement and Nielsen 
Coverage Service. They will furnish 
basic data to timebuyers on everything 
from TV station coverage and weekK 
audiences to information on multiple- 
set TV homes. 

4. Clinics, meetings. — Although the 
frontiers of TV knowledge are con- 
stantly being pushed ahead, both buy- 
ers and sellers of TV spot are aware 
that the more information is ex- 
changed, the better the medium will be. 

More "seminar"-type meetings this 
fall between specialized TV firms are 
expected, like the film seminars in 1951 
given by Transfilm. The American 
Television Society meetings, the NAR- 
TSR sessions between agencies and 
reps, and stepped-up NARTB sessions 
will help to spread TV knowledge 
throughout the industry, and will help 
to set more firm standards of practice 
and good taste. The American Associa- 
tion of Advertising Agencies, and its 
joint (with ANA) offshoot, the Adver- 
tising Research Foundation, is also ex- 
pected to play a large role in establish- 
ing good station-agency relationships, 
and in acting as a referee in handling 
problems dealing with TV research. 



Merchandising 



Q. Are TV stations beginning to 
develop merchandising campaigns? 

A. Merchandising in TV spot is far 
from being as widespread, well-devel- 
oped or aggressive as it is in spot 
radio. A few key stations in mature 
TV areas, such as NBC's and CBS' 
network TV flagships in New 7 York, as 
well as a handful of others like WLW- 
T and the Los Angeles TV outlets, are 
beginning to follow-through on TV 
campaigns at point of sale. 

You're more likely to find merchan- 
dising, at this stage of the relative de- 
velopment of TV and radio, being done 
at radio outlets, since this has proved 
a profitable business-getter in their 
running fight with TV. Most TV sta- 
tions manage to find business enough 
without having to add merchandising 
as an inducement. Also. TV stations 
do not have the kind of coverage areas 
that big radio stations have in which 
the added weight of merchandising 
can go a lot further in boosting total 
retail sales. 



Top agencies and clients 



Q. Who are the leading agencies 
placing TV spot business for fall? 

A. According to a cross-section of 
station reps, here are the agencies ex- 
pected to be most active in placing TV 
spot business. An alphabetical order, 
they are: 

N. W. Aver: D'Arcy: BBDO: Biow; 
Leo Burnett: Compton: Dancer-Fitz- 
gerald-Sample; Kenyon & Eckhardt; 
Maxon; McCann-Erickson: Potts. Cal- 
kins & Holden; R&R: Tatham-Laird; 
J. Walter Thompson: Weintraub; 
Young & Rubicam. 



Q. What clients are leaders in the 
use of TV spot? 

A. Several stations reps listed these 
clients, in alphabetical order, as being 
heavy in their present or anticipated 
use of spot TV: 

Ballantine, Blatz, Bulova, Buster 
Brown Shoes, Coca-Cola. Chrysler, 
Ford and Ford Dealers. General Foods, 
General Mills. Gruen Watches. Lever 
Bros.. Interstate Baking. Kellogg, 
Philip Morris. Procter & Gamble, 
Schaefer Beer, Sterling Drug. Virginia 
Dare. Ward Baking, and Wriglev. 



166 



SPONSOR 





HEW HORIZONS 

...IN TELEVISION! 

WXEL expands! 

• Four completely equipped modern studios 

• Theatre-Studio in the heart of downtown 
Cleveland 

• Three hundred seats — large screen projection 

• Award-Winning Mobile Unit and Remote Crew 

• Cleveland's largest television production plant 

• Fourteen television cameras 

• Sound movie cameras 

• Latest film equipment 

• Fully staffed publicity, promotion and 
merchandising departments 



Bringing Cleveland the finest in Local, National and World 
wide TV events: CLEVELAND INDIANS GAMES • CLEVE- 
LAND BROWNS GAMES • BOXING • NATIONAL TENNIS 

• SOHIO REPORTER • TOP STORY • PREMIERE THEATRE 

• SPORTS FINAL 



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1111 



CLEVELAND 



/ 



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ABC, DUMONT 



REPRESENTED BY THE KATZ AGENCY, INC. 
/// \ \ 



14 JULY 1952 



167 



memo from 




.. u II General Manager 
Ne «VorkW,N.V. 



^nlcofBLOOD, SEX 
Are you sic* ox 
and STEERS? rs 

+o stations, a " 
This is a ^sage to eievisi0 

and agencies *o are ^ ^ ^ audienoe . 

dia 
■ „ tfce famous Ency^ 
W e are now reieas.ng t ^ fUms for 
Bri tannioa series of 

teleViSl0n ' r les Eaohis 

• n +Yie series. 

. are 26 films in 
Th ere are ^^^ 

timed exactly to 

Bell Telephone 
-Mice Southwestern rre am 

Sponsors Xi» pole Real Ice Crea 

Kansas City)"-™* (Mil wauKee) . . -™ ird 
Pittsburgh)--^ 0l ^ d oth ers have 

Luonax Banx J^ exa^es - cXass 

returns :- «*•— appeax - . 

adV The cost is 

n . etpd below- Tne 

reasonable. 

that ways for «* elf 
< tlte library that -*"^^________-. 



Story of Christopher Columbus 

Robert Cavelier, Sieur de Las Salle 

Benjamin Franklin 

George Washington 

Thomas Jefferson 

Daniel Boone 

Lewis and Clark 

Alexander Hamilton 

John Marshall 



John Quincy Adams 

Eli Whitney 

Andrew Jackson 

Daniel Webster 

John C. Calhoun 

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 

Horace Mann 

John C. Fremont 

Abraham Lincoln 



Andrew Carnegie 
Booker T. Washington 
Susan B. Anthony 
Washington Irving 
James Fenimore Cooper 
John Greenleaf Whittier 
Oliver Wendell Holmes 
Louisa May Alcott 




Although TV this fall will still be confined to a freeze-era list 
of some 63 video markets, television is beginning a period 
of great and important growth. What the situation is today, 
and what it's likely to be in the near future, are presented 
in sponsor's TV Basics section — the first time such TV funda- 
mentals have been covered in a separate section. 

Television's current size and scope, the viewing habits of 
TV owners, how their time is divided among other media, 
the seasonal variations in viewing, the geographical distribu- 
tion ol TV, its socio-economic factors, the cost factors — all 
these affect fall TV plans of advertisers, and all these topics 
are detailed here in easy-to-follow charts and table-. 

As in sponsor's Radio Basics section, research contribu- 
tions were made by TV networks and stations, representa- 
tives, agencies, and independent research firm-. Careful 
editing and arrangement of these "basic" data present them, 
in logical order, to the reader. Reference to the index at 
right shows location. 

Agencies and advertisers who use this TV Basics section 
will find that its contents, despite the continuing growth of 
TV, are not likely to be out-dated overnight. Rather, it will 
be a handy reference for many months to come. 



I Dimensions of TV's 
audience 



II Television viewing 
habits 



Ell Cost of television 
advertising 



IV Television's billings 



no 



174 



MO 



IH2 




14 JULY 1952 



169 




1. What is the current size and scope of TV, market-by-market? 



SQURCE: NBC Television Research; Edward Petry Co. TV Research U. S. television data chart, 



1952. 



•Covered l>\ Los Angeles. "Estimate for Texas area. Estimated 2,500 additional sets in Mexican area. 

''Does not include estimated 52.000 sets in Canadian area reached by Buffalo station. 

"Does not include estimated 35,000 sets in Canadian area reached bv Detroit stations. 

•"Grand Rapids separately —134,000— Kalamazoo separately— 141,000 ""Indianapolis separately— 223.000— Bloomington separately — 157,000 

2. How many multiple-set TV homes are there? 





1 iMt 


NO. 


NO. 


NU. 


■ ■- 


AREA 


ZONE 


STATIONS 


FAMILIES 


SETS 


TRATION 


ALBUQUERQUE 


M 




53,700 


14,200 


26.4 


AMES 


C 




193,700 


83. OOO 


42.9 


ATLANTA 


E 




325.600 


169.000 


51.9 


BALTIMORE 


E 




177. 200 


386,000 


80.9 


BINGHAMTON 


E 




93,600 


66,000 


70.5 


BIRMINGHAM 


C 




261,400 


103,000 


40.0 


BLOOM INGTON 


t S«-«- !n«l 


■ iri ..]... 1 i ) 








BOSTON 


E 




l,101,3OO 


895.000 


81.3 


BROWNSVILLE iMATAMOROS. MEXICO) 








10,70O a 




3UFFALO 


E 




352, 10O 


268.00O 1 ' 


76.1 


CHARLOTTE 


E 




363,700 


143,000 


39.3 


CHICAGO 


C 




1,707,800 


1.155.000 


67.6 


CINCINNATI 


E 


3 


425,000 


323,000 


76.0 


CLEVELAND 


E 


3 


796,100 


614,000 


77.1 


COLUMBUS 


E 


3 


333,200 


210.000 


63.0 


DALLASFT. WORTH 


C 


3 


397.800 


164.000** 


41.2 


DAVENPORT. R.I. 


C 


2 


203.80O 


110.000 


54.0 


DAYTON 


E 


2 


278.50O 


188.000 


67.5 


DETROIT 


E 


3 


943.200 


667,000" 


70.7 


ERIE 


E 


1 


89.000 


79,700 


89.6 


GRAND RAPIDSl 
KALAMAZOO J 


E 


1 


364,000 


167,000 d 


45.9 


E 


1 








GREENSBORO 


E 


1 


183,300 


83,000 


45.3 


HOUSTON 


C 


1 


328.30O 


141.000 


43. 


HUNTINGTON 


E 


1 


193,200 


79,100 


40.9 


INDIANAPOLIS! 


C 


1 


433.600 


250,000' 


57.7 


BLOOMINGTONj 


C. 


1 








JACKSONVILLE 


E 


1 


120,100 


56,000 


46.6 


JOHNSTOWN 


E 


1 


300.500 


152,000 


50.6 


KALAMAZOO 


(See Gran 


d Rapids) 








KANSAS CITY 


C 


1 


473.600 


207.000 


43.7 


LANCASTER 


E 


1 


216. 10O 


147,000 


68.0 


LANSING 


E 


1 


222. OOO 


93,000 


41.9 


LOS ANGELES 


P 


7 


1.611.900 


1.185.000 


73.5 


LOUISVILLE 


C 


2 


258.000 


138. OOO 


53.5 


MEMPHIS 


C 


1 


294. 200 


130,000 


44.2 


MIAM 1 


E 


1 


189.700 


86,000 


45.3 


MILWAUKEE 


C 


1 


408,700 


332.000 


81.2 


MINN. -ST. PAUL 


C 


2 


458,400 


316.000 


68.9 


NASHVILLE 


C 


1 


218.20O 


63,000 


28.9 


NEW HAVEN 


E 


1 


404,400 


274.O0O 


67.8 


NEW ORLEANS 


C 


1 


2K4.300 


93,000 


32.7 


NEW YORK 


E 


7 


4,152,100 


2.970.00O 


71 5 


NORFOLK 


E 


1 


204. 60O 


114.000 


55.7 


OKLAHOMA CITY 


C 


1 


244.3O0 


92,300 


37.8 


OMAHA 


c 


2 


210.500 


127.000 


60.3 


PHILADELPHIA 


E 


3 


1.385.800 


1.042.00O 


75.2 


PHOENIX 


M 


1 


121. lOO 


39.400*** 


32.5 


PITTSBURGH 


E 


1 


747,800 


428.000 


57.2 


PROVIDENCE 


E 


1 


401. 200 


214,000 


53.3 


RICHMOND 


E 


1 


141,700 


124. OOO 


87.5 


ROCHESTER 


F. 


1 


209.700 


147.000 


70.1 


SALT LAKE CITY 


M 


2 


88. lOO 


73.0OO 


82 6 


SAN ANTONIO 


C 


2 


1 77.900 


76.400 


43 .0 


SAN DIEGO 


P 


1 


181.8O0 


11 7. OOO* 


64.4 


SAN FRANCISCO 


P 


3 


975. 80« 


377.0OO 


38.6 


SCHFNECTADY 


E 


1 


335.900 


21O.O0O 


62.5 


SEATTLE 


P 


1 


441 .200 


144.000 


32.6 


ST. LOUIS 


C 


1 


568. 900 


398. OOO 


70.0 


SYRACUSE 


E 


2 


226.500 


164.00O 


72.4 


TOLEDO 


E 


1 


314.300 


18O.00O 


57.3 


TULSA 


C 


1 


182.200 


77.500 


42.5 


UTICA 


F 


1 


122.600 


69.50O 


56.7 


WASHINGTON 


F 


t 


472.3P-0 


364. OOO 


77.1 


WILMINGTON 


E 


1 


1 13.900 


102.000 


70.9 


TOTAL (1 MAY J .952) 


I OS 


27.ai2.7nn 


I7.2»rt.«Of» 


B.I.I 



SOURCE: Advertest Research study conducted for SPONSOR, June 1932. 



» 



How maiit/ TV sets do i/ott 
flaw in your home mm-.' 



1 set 


93.8% 






2 sets ..... 


5.4 


3 sets 


.8 


Total 


100.0% 



<J 



Ho noil intend purehas- 
* iiifi an additional set for 
your home next near? 



Yes 


5.8% 


No . 


70.1 


Don't know 


24.1 


Total 


100.0% 



Advertest findings above show that multiple-set TV homes are emerging in New York 
metropolitan area, largest TV concentration in U. S., but not in any startling amount. 
N. Y. figure of 6.2% multiple TV is less elsewhere but shows multiple trend is starting. 



170 



SPONSOR 



3. How is TV distributed by geographical areas? 



SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen, 1952 



ALL RADIO 
HOMES (000) 
INCLUDING 
THOSE 
HAVING TV 



Northeast 

11,984 



% OF RADIO 
HOMES 
HAVING TV 
SETS 



East Central 

8,089 



West Central 

7,918 



South 

8,988 



Pacific 

5,821 



TV HOMES 
(000) 





7,351 



3,642 



2,524 



1,508 



1,914 



4. How soon will new TV stations come on the air? 



SOURCE: NBC TV estimates (by Edward D. Madden, v. p.) —June 1952. 

Total U. S. TV stations 
U. S. markets with TV 
Total TV homes (in millions) 



1952 
108 

63 

17.5 



1955 
600 
315 
32.0 



The outlook for post-freeze TV outlets 

In a recent speech to the American Marketing Association, NBC's 
v.p. in charge of TV operations and sales, Edward D. Madden, made 
the above predictions on the subject of new TV stations. As Madden 
views it, there'll be a gradual growth in U. S. television, not a boom. 
Expectations, now that the freeze is off and the FCC's "processing 
line" functions are rolling, are for no more than a dozen new stations 
during the rest of 1952, according to Madden. In 1953, some 80 new 
markets (mostly hitherto-non-TV areas) will be added slowly. The real 
rush will be in the next two years, Madden calculates, bringing the 
total up to 600 stations in 315 markets. This is likely to reach a total 
of 96,000,000 persons, or 60% of the nation's population. Beyond 
this point, the thinking goes off into the wild blue yonder, but RCA's 



chairman, Gen. David Sarnoff, predicts that by mid-1957 there will 
be 1,500 stations and 50,000,000 TV sets in homes and elsewhere. 
Figured at a conservative average of two-persons-per-set, that'll give 
you virtually all of the adult population of the U. S. What's the 
ultimate outlook? One prediction has come from General Electrics 
Dr. W. R. G. Baker (after whom GE's WRGB, Schenectady is named) 
who sees an eventual 2,000 stations and 53,000,000 TV sets after 1957. 
Of course, all of the above figures are guesstimates of the situation. 
Critical defense needs could throw the whole timetable out the win- 
dow. Lack of pressure from the military could speed it up. However, 
on 5 July, Martin Codel's authoritative "TV Digest" reported that 
the FCC "is in position to make some imporant grants right now.' 



14 JLM.Y 1952 



171 



5. How do TV and radio families compare on a socio-economic basis? 

SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen, 1952 



INCOME 
TV AM 



CITY 
SIZE 



UPPER 



MIDDLE 
CD 



LOWER 



1-2 



3 4 

CD 



43 



41 



lb 



33 



„ \ 



35 



3? 



METRO 



MEDIUM 
CD 

SM.WWRAL 













39 


65 






„__^ 


■ 


30 


. 




■ 








24 


31 


II 






^^ 



FAMILY 
SIZE 



5SAA0RE 



' : 




23 




1 


39 


46 






39 


H i 


\ 


29 


22 



MIGHEST 

EDUCATION 
GRADE T 



SCHOOL 
CD 



HIGH 
SCHOOL 



COLLEGE 



12 



60 



28 






23 



52 



TERRITORY 



A6E OF 
OLDEST CHILD 



NE 



EC 
CD 



WC 



SOUTH 

CD 

PACIFIC 




■ — - 



15 



II 



21 



NONE 

I. 1 



0-9 

CD 



14 



10-15 
CD 



■ 




32 


: 




49 


« 


: 








: 




■ 








I 






38 






2b 






■ 








30 




,"' 


25 




, 



OCCUPATION 

ifCAD Of MOUSE) 



AGE OF 
HOUSEWIFE 



WUITE 
COLLAR 

CD 



CRAFTSMEN 
FARMERS 



MANUAL 
CD 

** RETIRED 

gUNEMPLOyEP 



36 



30 



27 



Y 1 



28 



30 



25 



M0 

W0U5EWIFC 

CD 



lfo-34 



35-54 
CD 



'PHI 
17 



mm 



55 COVER 



16 


18 




' ■* 


31 


22 

: ■ 


;;<••'• ;. 


: 


\ 


i 


_' 






3 


39 










■ 


1 


: 


_— 


26 


14 


. 


: 




—J 


_- J 



85% of TV homes 
still upper-brachet 

Here, profiled from the U.S. — wide data of 
A. C. Nielsen, is how radio and TV audiences 
compare in socio-economic terms. The chart 
at left shows the differences in income levels, 
city sizes, family status and size, education 
etc. of the two basic broadcasting units — the 
TV-radio home and the radio-only home. 
Reference to the figures will show that nearly 
85% of the TV homes are from the upper 
and middle-income brackets, while radio — 
with its huge circulation — is almost evenly 
divided in thirds. 

The same applies to city sizes, with TV's 
heaviest concentration being in the metro- 
politan (500,000 and over) cities, while radio 
is again evenly distributed. 

Other comparative bar lines in the chart 
show that TV homes are more likely to have 
young children about, and be larger-family 
homes. Educational levels are about 10% 
higher in TV homes, and the head of the 
household is more likely to be a white collar 
worker or a skilled craftsman. 

Radio, incidentally, has a higher saturation 
among both the retired and the unemployed 
than does television in the U. S. 



172 



SPONSOR 



Mail from all Chicagoland... 




144 Illinois cities and towns 
in addition to Chicago 

34 Indiana cities and towns 

10 Michigan cities and towns 

8 Wisconsin cities and towns 

FORTY PER CENT of the mail was received from areas OUTSIDE Chicago 
— again proving that it's Station WNBQ which offers COMPLETE Chicago- 
land television coverage and a loyal and responsive audience which BUYS. 




TELEVISION IN CHICAGO 



Represented by NBC Spot Sales 




14 JULY 1952 



173 




n#*r 




1. How does TV viewing vary with the hour of the day? 



SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen, March 1952 



% TV Homes 

70 Total I . S. homes using TV by hours of day 



11,409 



10,996 



Homes reached (000) 



60 



50 



40 



30 



20 



8,416 



7,209 



6,168 



4,762 



3,158 



2,249 



1,257 

827 f^ 



10 33 347 

,, .. ,, . ...f j { t t { j , t..., i . x 



3 '"» 3 390 



3,753 



4,150 



;■■ ■ 



6,085 

'". l .w;i 















t I \ 1 J ~JL -iii 



9,897 






6A.M. 8 9 10 11 12 1P.M. 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 



2. How many hours do TV homes view daily? (compared to their radio listening) 

SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen, 1951-52 



Time TV homes spend teiffi TV and radio 



TV HOURS 

PER DAY. 

APR. 51 

TO MAR. '52 



RADIO 

HOURS PER 

DAY, APR 

'51 TO 

MAR. '52 





2 96 




4.97 


5.29 5 - 32 


5.76 


5.64 


5.61 




1.85 


1.77 


1.85 


5.12 




1.94 


1.97 


2.38 


4.30 


1.81 


1.80 




H.UO 






3.57 


1.80 


1.87 


3.52 


1.55 


1.60 


^88l: 




!■■«»■ ' ■ ■--■»- - 


........... 




-».^i- --.■■.--..» 








^%o^C ~X=^ 





APRIL MAY JUNE 

1951 



JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC. JAN. FEB. 



MAR. 
1952 



174 



SPONSOR 




WFAA-TV, Texas' top TV market 
including both metropolitan Dallas 
and Fort Worth, shows quite an array of 
appealing figures! Heading them 
up is a population of 1 ,270,700 with 
$1,988,192,000 buying income! 

look at these figures! 

NET EFFECTIVE BUYING INCOME 

WFAA-TV Market U. S. Difference 

PER CAPITA $1,573 $1,423 j 11% 

PER FAMILY 5,129 4,922 j- 4% 

RETAIL SALES PER FAMILY 

/ '/ J^^L RETAIL ST0RES 54,014 $3,377 f 19% 

yM / ^f >*1 AUTOMOTIVE 767 599 28% 

W V / S\^^ GENL. MDSE 818 402 | 103% 

DRUG 130 99 | 31% 

FURN., HHLD., RADIO 191 176 f 9% 

ISo/ei Management. Ma r 10, 195?) 

NOW 171,791 TV HOMES! 

(fe/ecoifing, June 16, 195?) 



<1 



* / CHANNEL f~± 

WrAA-TVjP 

NBC- ABC- DU MONT 



RALPH NIMMONS: STATION MANAGER 
EDWARD PETRY & CO.: REPRESENTATIVES 



14 JULY 1952 



175 



3. What's the national average in hours of viewing per home per day? 



SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen. April 1951-March 1952 

Average number of hours TV is usetl daily 
in all radio and rci«lio-TV homes 




APR. 51 MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC. JAN. FEB. MAR. 52 



4. How many homes are reached by the 'Top Ten 77 TV shows? 



SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen NTI, 26 April 1952 
Programs 



Homes Reached 



I Love Lucy 10,753,000 

Godfrey & Friends (Liggett & Myers) 7,605,000 

Texaco Star Theatre 7,559,000 

Red Skelton 7,421,000 

Your Show of Shows (Reynolds) 7,383,000 

You Bet Your Life 7,302,000 

Colgate Comedy Hour 7,175,000 

Your Show of Shows (part.) 6,791,000 

Robert Montgomery Presents (Johnson) 6,670,000 

Philco TV Playhouse 6,644,000 



"I. lieu" homes top 
radio's best 

Although TV has so far been confined 
to a limited area of 63 markets, the 
number of homes reached by the 
highest-rated shows is dramatic proof 
of the impact of the visual air me- 
dium. Philip Morris' "I Love Lucy," 
the number-one show during this in- 
season rating period, is estimated by 
Nielsen to have reached over 10,000,- 
000 TV homes — far more than are 
reached by the number-one radio 
show ("Lux Theatre") in the same 
period, even making allowances for 
multiple-set, outdoor listening. 



5. How does TV viewing in radio-TV homes vary with the season? 



SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen, 1951-52 
% homes using TV Daytime (9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 



Nighttime (6 p.m. to midnight) 




■ ^ 




JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUN. JUL. AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC. JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. 

1951 1952 



176 



SPONSOR 



6. How do TV owners divide their time among various advertising media? 



SOURCE: NBC TV Research Department (same source (or other two charts below), early 1951 

Minutes per person spent on eaeh tneilium 



MEDIA 



TV- 
OWNERS 



NON- 
OWNERS 



MAGAZINES 1Q.8 15.1 



TOTAL 
SAMPLE 



12.9 



% TOTAL 
SAMPLE 



5.7% 



NEWSPAPERS 


46.8 


50.4 


48.6 


21.6 


RADIO 


60.8 


119.4 


90.1 


40.3 



television 135.3 10.2 72.8 32.4 



TOTAL SPENT ON ALL MEDIA 253.7 195.1 224.4 100.0 



Most titnr spent with T\ 

According to this study, conducted by NBC 
TV early in 1951 in the New York area, TV 
owners spend more time with TV than with 
all major media put together. In fact, 
some 18.3% more. However, TV also adds 
to the time people are exposed to ad 
media. Reference to the chart will show that 
TV adds almost an hour to the total time 
people spend with advertising media in 
general. The average time spent with 
TV (all family heads, entire market) is 
about 73 minutes per day, which NBC TV 
feels is "probably an underestimate" for 
the population in the country as a whole. 



7. How does length of TV ownership affect time spent with other media? 

Minutes per person spent tlaily by length of TV ownership 



TIME OWNED 
TV SET 



TV 



RADIO 



NEWSPAPERS MAGAZINES 



1-5 MOS. 


133 


58 


47 


10 


6-H MOS. 


134 


62 


46 


9 


12-23 MOS. 


134 


61 


45 


11 


24-MOS. PLUS 


140 


62 


50 


13 




\o "novelty" eiieet 

The facts in this chart apparently explode 
a truism, that is, that TV owners tend to 
use their sets less as they own them longer, 
returning to normal use of other media. 
NBC TV points out, however, that the 
oldest set owners are usually in the upper- 
class income brackets, and tend to read 
more than do families in lower-income 
brackets who bought their TV sets more 
recently. The media use differences be- 
tween groups in "length of ownership" is 
mostly a matter of income level. 



8. How does income level, rather than TV ownership length, affect media? 



Ineome afieets media use 

Relationships between length of TV owner- 
ship and time spent on different media 
varies considerably as between low and 
high-income families. In low-income fami- 
lies, those who have owned their set longer 
spent equal or less time with other media 
than do new owners in that category. 
Among high-income families (over $4,000 
a year) the reverse tends to be true, with 
increases showing in all categories of media 
activity except radio, where there is a 
slight decrease. Says NBC: "Such differ- 
ences should probably be borne in mind in 
considering the 'long-term effects of TV 
ownership' on various media." 



M inutes per day spent h\ 


/ in route 


levels 




LOW-INCOME OWNERS 


TV 


RADIO 


NEWS 
PAPERS 


MAGA 
ZINES 


1. One-year owners 


137 


62 


47 


8 


2* Two-year owners 


142 


64 


43 


8 


3. Three-year owners 


159 


72 


45 


9 


HIGH-INCOME OWNERS 










1. One-year owners 


131 


57 


46 


11 


2» Two-year owners 


125 


58 


49 


14 


3* Three-year owners 


135 


56 


52 


15 



14 JULY 1952 



177 



9. What are the average month-by-month ratings by TV program types? 



SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen, 1951-52 



EVENING PROGRAMS-EXCLUDING CHILDREN'S 

Rating is figure ut left; at right is number of shows of the type.) 



Nielsen rating 
periods 



1951 1 JAN 

2 

1 FEB 

2 

1 MAR 

2 

1 APR 

2 

1 MAY 

2 

1 JUNE 

2 

1 JULY 

2 

1 AUG 

2 

1 SEP 

2 

1 OCT 

2 

1 NOV 

2 

1 DEC 

2 

)952 1 JAN 

2 

1 FEB 

2 

} MAR 

2 

1 APR 

2 

1 MAY 

2 



General 
Drama 



Mystery 
Drama 



Situation 
Comedy 



Variety 
Comedy 



Variety 
Music 



Quiz & 
Aud. Par. 



Sports 



26.6 

28.6 

28.7 

28.2 

27.2 

26.1 

26.6 

28.4 

24.8 

23.9 

24.0 

22.7 

21.6 

21.2 

20.9 

20.7 

21.9 

26.6 

25.1 

25.7 

25.6 

27.0 

26.1 

24.4 

26.5 

27.6 

27.1 

25.7 

26.1 

27.2 

27.3 

23.9 

24.8 

24.4 



20 

18 

18 

17 

18 

18 

19 

18 

16 

15 

16 

16 

17 

12 

13 

12 

1 5 J 

14 

17 

17 

17 

17 

18 

20 

16 

18 

18 

18 

18 

18 

21 

21 

20 

20 



28.7 

28.4 

26.6 

27.4 

27.1 

26.4 

26.6 

27.9 

25.2 

25.3 

25.5 

26.1 

23.3 

22.6 

21.1 

22.5 

22.2 

23.6 

22.1 

20.9 

21.4 

22.1 

21.5 

22.1 

24.3 

25.7 

24.5 

24.1 

24.8 

23.1 

23.4 

21.9 

21.7 

21.2 



12 27.6 

12 29.0 

12 29.4 

14 29.7 

13 28.3 

14 29.3 

15 27.4 

15 30.1 
14 24.4 
14 21.4 
14 22.7 

14 21.2 
17 21.3 

15 19.8 
15 19.4 

15 21.9 

16 24.4 
16 24.8 

20 29.9 

21 30.2 

22 32.8 
21 31.7 

21 32.7 

20 30.7 

22 32.6 

21 32.6 
21 31.3 
21 30.2 
21 30.7 
20 30.7 

19 33.2 

20 31.1 
20 27.4 
20 26.6 



8 27.6 

8 29.3 

8 29.8 

8 27.9 

8 27.6 

8 27.4 

8 27.5 

7 30.6 

7 25.1 

7 24.5 

7 22.8 

7 23.4 

7 20.3 

6 18.4 
4 16.0 
4 17.2 

7 20.4 

8 24.8 

9 27.0 
10 27.4 
10 29.2 
10 27.5 

10 27.3 
9 31.2 

1 1 32.6 

1 1 32.7 

12 32.9 
12 31.8 
12 31.0 
12 32.7 

10 31.1 
10 30.6 
10 28.1 
10 27.4 



19 20.0 

19 19.9 

18 20.1 

19 20.3 

19 20.0 

20 18.9 
19 18.5 

18 18.9 
17J 15.1 

19 14.2 

18 15.2 
15 14.6 
14 15.0 

8 16.2 

8 14.9 

8 15.9 

11 15.5 

13 16.4 

14 17.2 

15 15.8 

16 16.4 

15 17.7 

16 18.1 

19 18.6 

17 20.3 
16 21.0 



17 
16 



21.1 
19.4 

16 20.1 

17 20.4 
15 20.2 
15 18.4 
13 16.6 
13 16.9 



22 21.1 
24 21.9 

23 20.9 

24 21.7 

25 21.8 
24 19.7 
23 20.3 

22 20.7 

23 17.3 
23 16.5 

23 17.5 
21 17.5 
17 16.7 

13 15.5 
15 14.9 

15 16.0 
17 16.8 

24 J 18.3 
23 19.8 
22 1 19.8 
21 21.9 
20 22.1 
20 22.5 

16 22.3 
15 23.2 
14! 24.5 

14 24.2 

15 23.3 
14 23.8 
14 24.7 
14 26.7 

13 24.5 
14 ! 23.0 

14 23.3 



16 

16 

16 

16 

16 

17 

17 

17 

17 

16 

15 

15 

19 

18 

19 

19 

18 

18 

15 

15 

14 

14 

15 

14 

15 

14 

14 

14 

13 

13 

11 

11 

10 

10 



22.5 

23.1 

20.9 

23.6 

21.9 

19.7 

19.4 

21.7 

21.8 

21.0 

23.5 

16.0 

15.3 

13.3 

13.6 

15.1 

20.6 

22.6 

19.9 

21.9 

21.1 

22.1 

24.9 

25.4 

21.3 

21.0 

21.0 

22.2 

21.2 

20.3 

21.6 

20.6 

21.7 

23.4 



Music 



8 
7 
8 
8 
9 
9 
8 
7 
7 
7 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
5 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
7 
7 
9 
7 
8 
8 
8 
8 

8 i 
8 



21.9 
23.1 
21.9 
20.3 
19.0 
19.7 
17.5 
20.2 
15.8 
14.3 
14.1 
14.5 
13.6 

9.8 
11.1 

9.4 
14.1 
14.6 
13.6 
12.9 
13.3 
14.9 
15.4 
15.2 
16.1 
19.6 
19.0 
19.4 
18.6 
16.2 
18.2 
17.2 
15.8 
16.5 



All Eve. 
Programs 



24.0 
24.4 
24.1 
24.1 
23.4 
22.7 
22.6 
24.1 
5 20.2 
5 19.4 
5 19.7 
4| 18.8 
4 17.9 



16.9 
16.2 
17.0 
18.3 
20.1 
21.0 
20.6 
8 21.6 
6 22.0 
22.3 
23.0 
24.2 
24.8 
24.3 
23.4 



4 23.6 



23.6 
23.8 
22.4 
21.2 
21.2 



117 
118 
117 
120 
122 
124 
123 
118 
115 
116 
114 
HI 
115 
94 
95 
94 
108 
116 
121 
124 
126 
122 
123 
123 
121 
119 
122 
122 
122 
122 
118 
116 
114 
113 



178 



SPONSOR 



CHILDREN'S SHOWS 



Day 1 
(ex c 


'rogs. 
hild.) 


Western 


i 


Others 


Nielsen rating 
periods 


10.4 


13 


33.2 


4 


17.6 14 


1 JAN 


11.7 


17 


36.3 


4 


17.8 15 


2 


12.0 


18 


35.5 


4 


20.4 14 


1 FEB 


11.2 


19 


33.3 


4 


17.3 16 


2 


9.4 


20 


34.4 


4 


17.2 16 


1 MAR 


10.5 


20 


36.3 


4 


16.1 18 


2 


10.1 


21 


32.7 


4 


15.7 18 


1 APR 


9.6 


21 


30.8 


4 


15.5 18 


■p 


6.4 


24 


23.1 


4 


11.1 18 


1 MAY 


5.8 


24 


21.1 


4 


11.1 16 


2 


6.7 


25 


19.8 


4 


11.5 15 


1 JUNE 


6.8 


25 


19.6 


4 


10.6 15 


2 


5.6 


24 


17.9 


4 


10.2 14 


1 JULY 


5.6 


20 


19.9 


3 


9.6 12 


2 


5.9 


20 


19.3 


3 


9.9 13 


1 AUG 


6.0 


18 


19.8 


3 


9.6 14 




5.8 


24 


18.8 


4 


10.0 17 


1 SEP 


6.0 


28 


16.4 


5 


10.1 14 


2 


7.2 


35 


24.8 


5 


12.6 14 


1 OCT 


7.4 


35 


23.8 


5 


12.7 13 


9 


9.2 


34 


28.0 


5 


15.5 13 


1 NOV 


92 


35 


26.1 


5 


17.4 13 


~> 


8.3 


34 


26.5 


5 


16.4 13 


1 DEC 


9.7 


3? 


26.7 


5 


17.2 14 


p 


10.3 


33 


31.7 


4 


16.9 14 


1 JAN 


10.9 


31 


30.7 


4 


18.1 14 


2 


11.2 


30 


30.5 


4 


17.1 15 


1 FEB 


10.6 


30 


30.3 


4 


17.5 15 


j 


10.7 


30 


29.8 


4 


16.9 15 


1 MAR 


10.4 


31 


28.2 


4 


17.3 13 


2 


9.5 


27 


27.1 


4 


16.0 13 


1 APR 


7.7 


27 


22.6 


4 


12.5 13 


2 


7.9 


23 


21.0 


4 


10.7 13 


1 MAY 


8.3 


20 


18.7 


4 


11.2 13 


2 



If oir to use this chart 

The chart at left, despite its formidable array of rating 
figures, is a useful research tool in any TV sponsor's ref- 
erence collection. It gives advertisers a chance to study 
the trends in rating averages for particular show types 
over a period of more than a year. Month-by-month, it 
also gives him a chance to weigh rating averages against 
each other. When matched with average program time- 
and-talent costs, they give a sponsor an opportunity to 
weigh relative costs-per-1 ,000 homes. 

The simplest use for this chart is in following the rating 
trend for a basic TV program type, as measured by A. C. 
Nielsen. Reference to the figures at left will reveal that 
"general drama," as a TV category, is declining slightly 
in its rating average when compared on a year-long basis. 
Situation comedy shows, on the other hand, are rising, as 
witness the year-long NTI figures between January 1951 
and January 1952. 

Read across, the chart shows the relative positions of 
TV program rating averages for all of the Nielsen rating 
periods between January 1951 and the end of May 1952. 
Sponsors can judge, roughly, what types of programs hold 
their audiences best in a 52-week campaign that goes 
right through the summer months. The right-hand num- 
ber in the columns, the total number of shows of a type 
being televised during a given rating period, reveals where 
the greatest number of "summer casualties" occur. 

The most significant fact revealed by the table at left 
is probably the trend upward in all TV program ratings. 
For both evening and daytime, the all-program ratings for 
May 1952 were over the levels for May 1951. This means 
that most categories of TV programs (particularly situa- 
tion comedies) are generally attracting larger rating aver- 
ages and thus more people. 

Figures on number of shows in the chart show that 
mystery programs, whose rating average is beginning to 
sag a bit, are still the most durable of TV programs. 
There are relatively more TV mysteries on the air during 
the summer, as opposed to winter, than any other pro- 
gram type. Ratings, too, hold up, with the extreme sum- 
mertime low still being about 75°o of winter levels. 



14 JULY 1952 



179 



1. How does net TV compare in costs-per 1,000 people with other media? 



SOURCE: NBC TV. 1952 



$5.17 



$3.36 



E— -, 


E— , 


Dl ' 


Wl—r- 


n 



»I«mI»« comparative costs-per- 1,000 



$1, .57 




$3.83 































] 



NBC TV EVENING 
HALF-HOUR SHOW 
(AV. TIME b TAL.) 



NBC TV DAYTIME 
HALF-HOUR SHOW 
(AV. TIME & TAL.) 



LIFE MAGAZINE PACE 

BLACK & WHITE 

(INC ART, MECH.) 



500-LINE ADS 

64 LEADING 

NEWSPAPERS 

(INC. ART, MECH.) 



2. What is the relationship between spot TV costs and TV set circulation? 




I Sept. '49 I Dec. '49 I Mar. '50 t July '50 I Oct. '50 I Feb. '51 I May '51 I July '51 I Dec. '51 I Mar. '52 I June 52 



Costs-vs.'Sets are down 

In the last two or three seasons, with TV spot costs constantly jumping 
upward as TV stations raised their rates, sponsors have often felt 
that there was no sensible relationship between station costs and 
sets in TV markets. The chart above shows that this is not so. 



Based on the combined "open rate" for one-minute Class A film avail- 
abilities, using the highest-cost station in each market, the down-curv- 
ing line above shows how this rate-vs.-sets has declined from a level of 
950 in the fall of 1949 to present level of some 480-per- 1 ,000 TV sets. 
It is, however, a simple ratio of cost-to-circulation in 63 TV markets. 



180 



SPONSOR 



3. What's the cost-per-1,000 of network programs-by types? 



SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen, 9 February 1952 



Evening once-a-week ftalf-ftour show comparisons (two weeks ending .9 February 1952) 



QUIZ & 
AUD. PART. 

SITUATION 
COMEDY 



3 GENERAL 

< DRAMA 

at 

O 

O VARIETY 

£ COMEDY 



= MYSTERY 

g DRAMA 

H OTHER 

X MUSIC 



INTERVIEW 



VARIETY 
MUSIC 




$15.69 

(2 1.4 rating) 



1/4 -HOUR 
PROGRAMS 



3.35 
( 17.0 rating) 



1-HOUR 
PROGRAMS 



$13.82 

(34.7 rating) 



4. What are some typical talent-production costs for TV shows? 



SOURCE: SPONSOR June 1952 estimates 



SITUATION COMEDY 

Amos 'n' Andy $30,000 

I Love Lucy 27,500 

Our Miss Brooks 23,500 

My Friend Irma 22,000 

Aldrich Family 20,000 



MYSTERY DRAMA 

Crime Syndicated $14,000 

Treasury Men in 

Action 13,000 

Martin Kane 12,500 

Man Against Crime 12,000 

Suspense 12,000 



The Web 
Ellery Queen 
Charlie Wild 



GENERAL DRAMA 



$10,000 QUIZ PANEL 

10,000 Celebrity Time $11,500 

9,000 What's My Line 8,500 

Down You Co 4,000 



Schlitz Playhouse $28,000 
Hallmark Hall of 

Fame 11,000 

City Hospital 10,000 



AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION 

Beat the Clock $6,500 
Strike It Rich 6,000 



CONCERT MUSIC 



Voice of Firestone 


$18,000 


( For both radio an 


d TV) 


VARIETY COMEDY 


$35,000 


Jack Benny 


Red Skelton 


30,000 


Burns and Allen 


28,000 


Paul Winchell- 




Jerry Mahoney 


16,000 



VARIETY MUSIC 
Ezio Pinza Show $29,500 
Royal Showcase 25,000 

This Is Show Busi- 



ness 



17,500 



Arthur Murray 

Party 12,000 

Star of Family 14,000 



POP ULAR MUSIC 

Hit Parade $28,000 

Sammy Kaye Sere- 
nade 11,000 



14 JULY 1952 



181 



1. How much money, has been invested in network time in recent years? 



SOURCE: Publishers Information Bureau 



1952 

FIRST 5 

MONTHS 




$27,065,274 





35.162,947 



9,434.888 




3,740,274 



+ OR - 
FROM I95I 


+ 91.0 V 


+ 56.3 


+ 35.9 


+ 49.8 



YEARLY TOTALS 




I95I TOTAL 



$42,470,844 



59,171,452 



18,585,911 



7,761,506 



+ OR - 

FROM 1950 



226.4'. 



179.3 



4- 180.4 



(No report) 



1 950 



$13,011,831 



191$] $12,294,513 




19501 $40,826,185 




21,185.692 



6,628.662 



(No report) 



1 949 



195J1 $127,989,713 



$3,446,893 



6,500,104 



1,391,991 



955,525 



1 948 



No 

P.I.B. 
Report 



2. How much money is being spent to buy national spot TV time? 

SOURCE: SlPONSOR estimate 

n 




1949 
$8 million 



1950 
$25 million 



1951 
$60 million 



1952 
$72 million (estimate) 



182 



SPONSOR 



c£udll with a Reputation 




That's Mary Landis . . . chief cook etc., 

on the "In The Kitchen with Mary Landis" show. 

Reputations aren't built overnight, you know. 

It took three years of "doin" for Mary to 

produce what is now recognized to be Baltimore's 

outstanding cooking show on Television. 

And prominent local and national advertisers 

will gladly show sales success stories 

traceable directly to the Mary Landis show. 

Here's good. Good News 

Anita Conboy, our "Mary Landis" 

is soon to have a baby. She will continue to 

direct the show behind the scenes, and 

give personal guidance to her very capable 

assistant, Marsha Adams who will do the 

show 'til Mary returns ... in person. 



"In the Kitchen w 
now BIGGER and 

► A brand new, custom-built kitchen provides 
a new setting. 

► The exclusive home kitchen-tested seal 
stamped on every advertiser's product. 

► Mary Landis, two home economists, and a 
special announcer devote full time to this 
multiple feature program. 



MON. THRU FRI. — 1:00 TO 1:45P.M. 



NATIONALLY REPRESENTED BY 
EDWARD PETRY & CO. 



ith MARY LANDIS 1 ' 
B ETTE R than ever 

► A monthly recipe booklet available to viewers 
on request. 

► Extra aids to make this a complete TV adver- 
tising-merchandising package. 

► On-the-air and newspaper promotion give 
certainty to the reputation of this three-year 
success. 

Television Baltimore 

WBAL-TV 

N BC in Maryland 



14 JULY 1952 



183 



THE AWARD WINNING STATION 

WITH THE HIGH HOOPERS 
IN ONE OFTHE NATION'S RICH EST MARKETS! 




71 f -r "* 

Share of Audience 

M o r n i n g 60.2 

Afternoo n 65.3 

E v e n i n g 59.6 



TOP QUALITY 
MARKET OF 
PENNSYLVANIA 

Highest Per Capita Income 
Highest Quality of Market 
Among State's Major 
Markets 

Retail Sales 192% of aver- 
age of State 

Retail sales activity 92% 
above national average 

Income average $353 above 
U. S. per capita 

Your selling has an above 
average effect when you use 
WHP. And you get a bonus 
of Lancaster, York and 
Lebanon. 



CBS Radio Network 



>^ HARRISBURG,PA. 



KEY STATION OF 
THE KEYSTONE 
STATE 




5QOOW580KC 



REPRESENTED BY BOLLING 









Tl 




TV film trends, film listings, 
radio-TV research, sports . . . 



This section, containing a miscellany of air advertising topic-, 
opens with a discussion of films for TV. Main film trend 
spotted is the bullishness of agencymen about TV film. They 
see it as becoming the maor programing component of the 
medium within a short time. Included in sponsor's cover- 
age of television film are a variety of lists, ranging from a 
cross-section of film fare to the names of syndicators. 

Immediately after the pages devoted to film appears a 
series of charts from an up-to-date ANA study of TV cost-per- 
1,000. These just-released charts are printed here for their 
value in day-to-day use as buying tools. 

Other subects of industry-wide interest to be found in thi< 
section include an explanation of the differences between the 
various radio-TV research organizations, radio and TV sports 
sponsorship, and mail order air advertising. See index at 
right for page numbers of all topics. 

14 JULY 1952 



TV film trends 


186 


TV film pre»gr«ims. list 


189 


TV film producers, list 


192 


Film ciminu'rciiil producers. 




list 


194 


Film s.vndicators. list 


196 


Allied services, list 


1»7 


TV eost-per- 1,000 


202 


Research 


206 


Theatre and fee TV 


21 1 


Unions 


21 1 


C ontests and premiums 


2I!> 


Codes and censorship 


219 


TV and sports 


22 1 


Itadio and sports 


22 1 


Vlail order and 1*. 1. 


22:» 




185 



TV film trends 



Q. What is the outlook for TV 
film programing this year? 

A. In its TV Film Section I 10 March 
19521 sponsor stated that a poll taken 
among leading ad agencies showed that 
7(1' , of them were of the opinion that 
b) the time TV covered all markets 
TO', of the programing would be on 
film. Recent events not only lend con- 
siderable substance to this forecast but 
indicate that the 70' ' ', level will be 
reached long before the time estimated. 

Leading the parade toward film is 
the country's largest advertiser. Proc- 
ter & Gamble. It has just added a third 
show to its film line-up. The Doctor. 
This advertiser has a separate subsidi- 
ary. Procter & Gamble Productions. 
Inc.. which not only produces all P&G 
film programs but controls all the 
rights to these productions. The costs 
for the three P&G shows on film, as 
(|uoted by the company itself are: The 
Doctor ($17,000); Fireside Theatre 
(around $20,000 I ; and Beulah ($17,- 
000 l . The production tab for the three- 
some for the 1952-53 season will total 
around $2,250,000. 

Bill Craig, head of P&G's TV opera- 
tions, bears out sponsors estimate of 
TV film. Craig says: "In five years 1 
estimate 75', of TV's programing will 
be on film. I'm ver\ enthusiastic about 
the use of film for dramatic shows." 

Craig added that P&G's Welcome 
Travelers would be live because a pro- 
gram of that tvpe couldn't keep its 
spontaneit) with a film version. Day - 
time serials? Too expensive to film, 
according to Craig. Besides an adver- 
tiser wouldn't want to show two differ- 
ent episodes in the same town at the 
same time. 



ffl&w* 




TO INTRODUCE NEW CEREAL, KELLOGG BOUGHT TIME LOCALLY FOR "WILD BILL HICKOK" FIL 



Other P&G activities call for the 
first Red Skelton show to be on film 
this fall. It's strictly a one-time shot 
and will not be available for reuse I be- 
cause of Skelton's movie contract I . 

Fred Coe also presents some hard- 
hitting reasons why the major pro- 
grams of the very near future will be 
on film. Coe. director of Goodyear 
Television Playhouse, says "TV will 
price itself into film. A full-hour dra- 
matic show may cost the sponsor some 
$30,000 per week for the production. 



FILM PROGRAMS WIN HIGH RATINGS 



PROGRAM 



FOODINI 

SUNDAY 1:15 P.M. 



SMILIN ED 

SATURDAY 11:30 A.M. 



FILM THEATRE 

SUNDAY 2:OOP.M. 



GENE AUTRY 

SUNDAY 7.00 P.M. 



BOOTS & SADDLES 

FRIDAY 6:OOP.M. 



CISCO KID 

TUESDAY 7:00 P.M. 



RATINGS 



8.6 



14.7 



15.7 



28.3 



SNARE 



81.9 



75.9 



68.3 



20.6 



58.1 



68.9 



28.1 



PROGRAM 



KIT CARSON 

TUESDAY 6 OOP. M. 



LONE RANGER 

THURSDAY 7:30 P.M. 



FIRESIDE THEATRE 

TUESDAY 9:00 P.M. 



RACKET SQUAD 

THURSDAY 10:00 P.M. 



AMOS N' ANDY 

THURSDAY 8:30 P.M. 



RATINGS 



13.9 



28.8 



40.0 



SHARE 



47.0 



59.8 



63.2 



31.7 62.2 



38.0 58.5 



And when the show is over, what doe- 
he have for this money? . . . Nothing! 
"Script rights revert to the author, 
and union regulations prevent a re- 
showing of the kinescope — $30,000 
gone with the wind. Film on the other 
hand has that all-important rerun val- 
ue which is the quality I feel counts 
the most in television." 

Bearing out these comments are the 
top sponsors who are switching to film. 
Ford Motor is sponsoring a Hollywood- 
produced show (Screen Gems is pro- 
ducer I . In the fall, the Carnation Com- 
pany and the B. F. Goodrich Company 
will alternate weekly sponsorship of 
the Burns & Allen program on film. 
The program is currently on live in the 
East and by television recording in 
other sections of the countr\ . 

Singer Sewing Machine Compam is 
sponsoring Four Star Playhouse, a 
half-hour dramatic series to be filmed 
in Hollywood bv Official Films. The 
program will be seen on CBS-TV on 
an alternate week basis beginning 11 
September (Thurs. 8:30 to 9:00 p.m. I . 

Oilier advertisers, firm believers in 
film, include Schlitz, DuPont, Chrysler 
Corporation ( DeSoto-Plymouth deal- 

SPONSOR 



93.0 



I LOVE LUCY 

MONDAY 9:OOP.M. 



48.6 



74.1 




ARKETS WERE CHOSEN TO KEEP PACE WITH DISTRIBUTION AND PACKAGE ART TIED IN WITH PROGRAM FOR STRONG KID APPEAL 



ers I . Top-rated shows on film include 
My Friend Irma. Dragnet, Dangerous 
Assignment, Fireside Theatre, with 
Irma number one anion" all net shows. 

Q. What are some of film TV's 
problems? 

A. The problems of TV film syndica- 
tion — pricing and repeat runs — loom 
as the major difficulty. Fred J. Mahl- 
stedt, director of CBS Television Film 
Sales, says, "Experience gained in the 
next year should go a long way toward 
solving these problems. The coming 
year will shape up as the vear in which 
the TV film distribution and film pro- 
duction industries will approach rea- 
sonably stable operations. With more 
and more advertisers and stations turn- 
ing to films for TV programing it is 
pretty obvious that the future of the 
entire television industrv depends to a 
great extent on a solid foundation of 
reliable and solidly financed produc- 
tion and distribution outfits. 

"As in any new industry. TV film 
sy ndication needed a few shakedown 
years to separate the wheat from the 
chaff. By the end of the coming year 
I feel that this should be pretty well 
accomplished." 

14 IULY 1952 



Rather than seeing problems, most 
observers felt film's big future was the 
standout fact. 

William Chalmers, Grey Advertising 
vice president and radio-TV director, 
told sponsor: "Major programing is 
all going to be on film. The networks 
will be important for day-to-day live 
services I news and sports I . But when 
you get into film, stations aren't going 
to want to bother with the networks 
when they can get the full profits from 
local film programing. It will result in 



(|uite a different relationship between 
the networks and stations. The local 
stations will have to decide whether 
live net service is important enough to 
them."' 

So went the majority of the com- 
ments on film. The problems are rec- 
ognized but aren't deemed important 
enough to hold film back. From what 
looks like a major role in T\ pro- 
gram ins:. 

[Please turn to page 198) 



On following pages see lists covering 

• Available TV film fare »»«»«' '#•*> 

• TJ film producers /»«</«' 192 

• Commercial producers i»«fC 194 

• Film syndicators /'"?/'* I9U 

• Film allied services />»</*' 197 

For further discussion of film see Hob Foreman's column, i>a±' 24 



:*■!?" 



/f 



0^> 



rfj 



y 



y 



Miw 



ded 



The Billboard 

I!f£HL^M OUARTMLY „.„., „ 

JUNE H, 1952 



Place 



F\Ut 5tt«« 



• Unity Television Corp. 

^ >501 Broadway, New York 36 N V 

i * mwm * — i ii v ' ' 

2 ¥ 'f™ «««* fer Tfite^ 

W3 Haeison Ave„ fe» y effc N ' y 

•■'••..SWiRsTelBrfdoBCo 

- <! * W. 57th S.'.. New IteV i*.' r" Vi ' ' 

2-9 ft'. 4;rf SL Nsw yo* it V. 

6 Peerlen R{ m fo 

? Honcgrsw Pjd Hre , 

^ H^f ****** »o4Kn m .\nt 

ti: -'■ ^ Blvd., if ji Wcd 23, ftVf*"' 

9 k"? !«***** WetrWofl Sales 

4 " W 5fift Sf.. fe rwft f^'sj/y 

^^^^^S^^^J^JILif > « .^ ^c (Wlti rrj 



14 






thanks to 

every station in the nation 
for voting UNITY top honors 

~ ~ ~ and thanks to BILLBOARD for the many Kudos 
accorded to UNITY in the first National T-V Film Survey 



-V 



Write, wire or phone for 
UNITY'S new 40 page 
catalog of films to fit 
every time segment and 
type of programming. 



iigjjjj^ ^£$pgg» 



(meBOaaBBXaa 



1501 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 18. N. Y. • LOngacre 4-8234 

ARCHE MAYERS "BOB" WORMHOUDT "CONNIE" LAZAR LEN fIRESTONE $/0 WEINEK 

President Salei Manager Program Director Eastern Div. Mgr. TV Booker 




PROGRAMS: a cross-seetion of video films on the «,r now or available for sale 



Programs, by type 



Children's Shows 



Length 



No. of 

episodes 

in the can' 



Producer* 



Sales Agent* 



How available 



Cost Range* 



THE CHIMPS 



CYCLONE MALONE 



JUMP JUMP OF HOLIDAY HOUSE 



DICK TRACY 



CRUSADER RABBIT 



FUN WITH FELIX 



FUNNY BUNNIES 



BETSY AND THE MACIC KEY 



JUNIOR SCIENCE 



TIME FOR BEANY 



UNK AND ANDY 



STREAMLINED FAIRYTALES 



Commentary — General 



15 m. 



15 m. strip 



15 m. strip 



30 m. 



5 m. strip 



15 m. 



5 or 15 m. 



15 m. strip 



15 m. 



15 m. strip 



15 m. 



15 m. 



13 



65 



65 



39 



195 



13 



26 wks. 



13 wks. 



14 



Continuous 



26 



13 



Crosby Enterprises 



Consolidated TV Sales 



Consolidated TV Sales 



Snader Telcscription Sales 



jerry Fairbanks, Inc. 



UTP 



Fletcher Smith Studios iN.Y. ) 



Dynamic Films 



Motion Pictures for TV 



Dynamic Films 



CBS TV Film Sales 



Olio Video TV Prod. <N.Y.) 
Station KTLA 



lack Kenaston Prods. 



United Artists Television 



Harry S. Coodman Prods. DuMont Film Dept. 



Synd. 



Net or Synd. 



Net or Synd. 



Synd. 



Synd. 



Net or Synd. 



Net or Synd. 



Net or Synd. 



Net or Synd. 



Paramount TV Productions Synd. 



Synd. 



Synd. 



S20-400 



Net— S200 each 
Synd.— S75-1. 050 wk 



Net— SI. 800 each 



S48-290 



On request 



On request 
On request 
S25-400 
On request 



S120-500 weekly 



$45-200 



On request 



HOLLYWOOD REEL 



IOHN KIERAN'S KALEIDOSCOPE 



THIS IS THE STORY 



HY-LICHTS 



TELEVISION CLOSEUPS 



Drama — Adventure 



ARMCHAIR ADVENTURE 



BIC CAME HUNT 



CLYDE BEATTY SHOW 



STRANCE ADVENTURE 



CHOST TOWNS OF THE WEST 



Drama — Comedy 



I LOVE LUCY 



AMOS 'N' ANDY 



BURNS & ALLEN 



BEULAH 



THAT'S MY POP 



CLIFF NORTON 



Drama — General 



THE BEST THINCS IN LIFE 



HOLLYWOOD HALF HOUR 
STORY THEATRE 

U — 

THE UNEXPECTED 



(REBOUND 



15 m. 



15 m. 



15 m. 



15 m. 



5 m. 



30 m. 



30 m. 



30 m. 



15 or 30 m. 



15 m. 



30 m. 



30 m. 



30 m. 



30 m. 



30 m. 



5 m. 



15 or 30 m. 



30 m. 



30 m. 



30 m. 



30 m. 



15 m. 



52 



52 



12 



13 



26 



104 



26 



Erskine Johnon and 
Coy Watson 



Paramount TV Productions Synd. 



International Tele-film 



United Artists Television 



Synd. 



Morton TV Prod. 



Snader Telescriptions 



Synd. 



DuMont Film Dept. 



lerry Fairbanks, Inc. 



Synd. 



Synd. 



S. |. Turell 



Sterling TV Co. 



Synd. 



Jules B. Weill 



Film Vision Corp. (N.Y.) Synd. 



26 



Walter White, Jr. 



Commodore Prod. (Hywd) Synd. 



52 



Cordon Levoy 



CBS TV Film Sales 



Synd. 



Simmel-Meservey 



Synd. 



Continuous 



Desilu Productions 



Net 



Continuous 



Amos V Andy Prods. 
(CBS Package) 



Net 



Continuous 



Ralph Levy iCBS Package) 



Net 



26 



Roland Reed Prod, 
i made to order) 



Net 



In prod. 



Revue Productions 



MCA 



Net 



Continuous 



Benton & Bowles 
I made to order) 



S25-200 



S45-400 



S24-300 



On request 



On request 



S40-125 



S100-750 



On request 



S50-190 



S25-400 



Not on sale 



Not on sale 



Not on sale 



Not on sale 



On request 



Net or Synd. 



Not on sale 



6 (more in prod.) Emy Productions 



Consolidated TV Sales 



13 



Jerry Fairbanks, Inc. 



Net or Synd. 

Net or Synd. 



Net— S6.000 (15 m.) 
Synd.— $78-880 



On requet 



26 



Grant-Realm 



Ziv TV 



Synd. 



S80- 1,000 



52 



Ziv Television 



Synd. 



S165-3.000 



13 



Crosby Enterprises 



UTP 



26 



i lNVITATION PLAY HOUSE 

Then only one company is named, it is both producer and sales agent. 

14 JULY 1952 



Synd. 



S145-2.440 



Rene Williams 



Syndicated TV Productions Synd. 



S115-158 



! listed are only fur available markets. & „ lower or 

higher rate .of the »<.< 

189 



Programs, by type 


Length 


No. of 

episodes 

"in the can" 


Producer* 


Soles 


Agent* 


How oval 


able 


Cost Range* * 


LITTLE THEATRE 


15 m. 




26 




TeeVee Company 






Synd. 




$50-575 


ROYAL PLAYHOUSE 


30 m. 




52 




Crosby Enterprises 


UTP 




Synd. 




$75-1,500 


MAN IN THE IRON MASK 


30 m. 




26 




Revue Productions 


MCA 




Synd. 




On request 


KINGS CROSSROADS 


30 or 


60 m. 


104 




Sterling Television 






Synd. 




$100-750 


ADULT DRAMA SERIES 


15 or 


30 m. 


— 




William Morris Agency 






Synd. 




On request 



Drama — Mystery 



HOLLYWOOD OFFBEAT 



THE CASE OF EDDIE DRAKE 
THE FILES OF JEFFREY JONES 



SCOTLAND YARD 



FRONT PACE DETECTIVE 



PUBLIC PROSECUTOR 



CRAIC KENNEDY, CRIMINOLOGIST 



DANGEROUS ASSIGNMENT 



FOREIGN INTRIGUE 



MEET THE VICTIM 



BOSTON BLACKIE 



CAPSULE MYSTERIES 



DILEMMA 



JIM HARDY, ACE CRIME REPORTER 



30 m. 


26 


Parsonnet 


UTP 


Synd. 


$75-1,775 


30 m. 


13 


Imppro 


CBS TV Film Sales 


Synd. 


$100-1,250 


30 m. 


13 


Lindsley Parsons 


CBS TV Film Sales 


Synd. 


$125-1,500 


30 m. 


26 


DuMont Film Department 




Synd. 


On request 


30 m. 


39 


Jerry Fairbanks, Inc. 




Synd. 


On request 


15 m. 


26 


Jerry Fairbanks, Inc. 




Synd. 


On request 


30 m. 


13 


Adrian Weiss Prod. 


Louis Weiss & Co. 


Synd. 


$111.15-2,193.75 


30 m. 


39 


NBC Film Syndication Dept. 




Synd. 


$65-2,000 


30 m. 


39 


Sheldon Reynolds 


J. Walter Thompson 


Synd. 


$115.83-429 


15 m. 


13 


S. J. Turell 


Sterling TV Co. 


Synd. 


$60-200 


30 m. 


78 


Ziv Television 




Synd. 


$110-2,250 


5 m. 


13 


Charles Michelson, Inc. (N.Y.) 


Synd. 


$20-89.75 


15 m. 


13 


Harry S. Goodman Prod. (N.Y.) 


Synd. 


On request 


5 m. 


156 


Illustrate, Inc. 




Synd. 


On request 



Drama — Western 



CENE AUTRY 



RANGE RIDER 



KIT CARSON 



HOPALONC CASSIDY 



BUSTER CRABBE SHOW 



THE CISCO KID 



ROY ROGERS 



WILD BILL HICKOK 



LONE RANCER 



30 m 


52 


Flying A Prod. 


CBS TV Film Sales 


Net & 


Synd. 


$150-2,000 


30 m. 


52 


Flying A Prod. 


CBS TV Film Sales 


Synd. 




$125-1,500 


30 m. 


26 


Revue Prod. 


MCA 


Synd. 




On request 


60 m. 


49 




NBC Film Synd. 


Synd. 




$75-700 


30 m. 


26 


Jules B. Weill 


Film Vision Corp. (N.Y.) 


Synd. 




$100-750 


30 m. 


78 


Ziv Television 




Synd. 




$95-2,095 


30 m. 


26 


Roy Rogers Productions 




Net 




Not on sale 


30 m. 


52 


Wm. Broidy Prod. 




Synd. 




Not on sale 


30 m. 


78 


Apex Films 




Net 




Not on sale 



Music 



HOLIDAY IN PARIS 



PARADISE ISLAND 



CAFE CONTINENTAL 



VIENNA CHOIR BOYS & SALZBURG 
MARIONETTES 



VIENNA PHILHARMONIC 



WORLD'S IMMORTAL OPERAS 
MUSIC TO REMEMBER 



ENCHANTED MUSIC 



ALL NATIONS SYMPHONY 



OLD AMER. BARN DANCE 



Musical Shorts 



TELESCRIPTIONS 



TV DISK JOCKEY TOONS 



TELE-DISK JOCKEY 

MUSICAL MOMENTS 



30 


m 


13 


John Nasht 




CBS TV Film Sales 


Synd. 


$85-1,250 


15 


m 


26 


Jerry Fairbanks, 


nc. 




Synd. 


On request 


15 


m 


13 


Sterling TV Co. 






Synd. 


$45-150 


15 


m. 


13 


Eugen Sharin 




Sterling TV Co. 


Synd. 


On request 


15 


m 


13 


Eugen Sharin 




CBS TV Film Sales 


Synd. 


$30-250 


30 


m 


7 


Ceo. Richfield 




CBS TV Film Sales 


Synd. 


$70-600 


30 


m 


13 


Ceo. Richfield 




Screen Gems, Inc. 


Synd. 


$50-500 


30 


m 


13 


S | Turell 




Sterling TV Co 


Synd. 


On request 


15 


m. 


13 


All Nations Prod. 


Corp. 


INS-INP TV Dept. 


Synd. 


On request 


30 


m 


26 


Kling-United 




UTP 


Synd. 


$75-675 



3l/ 2 m. 


800 


Snader Telescriptions Sales 




Synd. 


On request 




3'/2 m. 


(00 


Screen Gems, Inc. 




Synd. 


$20-50 




3 m. 


170 


Seaboard Studios 


United Artists 


Synd. 


On request 





3 m. 



2-4 



Dynamic Films 



Mot. Pic. for TV 



Synd. 



On request 



190 



SPONSOR 



Programs, by type 



News 



Length 



No. of 

episodes 

in the can' 



Producer' 



Sales Agent* 



How available 



Cost Range' 



INS-TELENEWS DAILY 



INS-TELENEWS WEEKLY 



MARCH OF TIME through the Years 



NBC DAILY NEWS REPORT 



NBC NEWS REVIEW OF THE WEEK 



WASHINGTON CLOSE-UP 



WASHINGTON SPOTLICHT 



HEADLINES ON PARADE 



YESTERDAY'S NEWSREEL 



UP-MOVIETONE NEWSREELS 



8 m. 



18 m. 



30 m. 



8 m. 



15 m. 



15 m. 



15 m. 



15 m. 



15 m. 



15 m. 



Continuous 



Continuous 



26 



Continuous 



Continuous 



Wkly. 



Wkly. 



52 



156 



5 da. weekly 



INS-INP Telenews Prod., Inc. 



Synd. 



INS-INP Telenews Prod., Inc. 



Synd. 



The March of Time 



Synd. 



NBC News & Special 
Events Dept. 



NBC Film Synd. 



Synd. 



NBC News & Special 
Events Dept. 



NBC Film Synd. 



United Artists Television 



Snader Telescriptions Sales 



United World Films 



Ziv Television 



United Press-Movietone News 



Synd. 



Synd. 



Synd. 



Synd. 



Synd. 



Synd. 



On request 



On request 



On request 



$150-350 wkly 



$33-275 



$55-400 



$20-260 



On request 



$40-500 



On request 



Special Interest Films 



CRUSADE IN THE PACIFIC 



THIS LAND OF OURS 



THIS WORLD OF OURS 



YOU COULD BE WRONG 



HOLLYWOOD CLOSEUPS 



VACATION WITH THE STARS 



COINC PLACES with Uncle Ceorge 



HOLLYWOOD ON THE LINE 



STRANCER THAN FICTION 



MOVIE QUICK QUIZ 



MACCI McNELLIS— What's Playing 



HANDY ANDY 



30 m. 



10 m. 



15 m. 



15 m. 



15 m. 



10 m. 



30 m. 



15 m. 



15 m. 



15 m. 



15 m. 



26 



In prod. 



26 



13 



26 



13 



65 



March of Time 



Dudley Television Corp. 



Dudley Television Corp. 



Dudley Television Corp. 



Cene Lester Productions 



Cene Lester Productions 



|erry Fairbanks, Inc. 



CBS Television Film Sales 



United World Films 



Continuous 



52 



13 



Walter B. Schwimmer Prod. UTP 



Station Distributors 



Synd. 



Synd. 



Synd. 



Synd. 



Synd. 



Synd. 



Synd. 



Synd. 



Synd. 



Synd. 



Synd. 



Sterling Television Co., Inc. 



Synd. 



On request 



On request 



On request 



On request 



On request 



On request 



On request 



$44-440 (all film) 
$40-400 (script) 



$15-175 



$125-750 (wk) 



$55-390 



$40-125 



Sports 



SPORTSCHOLAR 



COIN' PLACES with Gadabout Caddis 



MADISON SQUARE GARDEN 



SPEED CLASSICS 



THE SPORTSMAN'S CLUB 



SPORTS REELS 



TELESPORTS DICEST 



WRESTLINC FROM HOLLYWOOD 



RINCSIDE WITH THE RASSLERS 



WRESTLING HICHLICHTS 



ROLLER DERBY 



SPORTS ON PARADE 



DOUBLE PLAY 



SPORTS ALBUM 



THIS WEEK IN SPORTS 



TELENEWS SPORTS EXTRA 



15 m. 


52 


United World Films 




Synd. 


$25-400 




15 m. 


26 


Beacon Television Features 




Synd. 


$65-510 




30 m. 


13 


Leslie Winik 


MCA 


Synd. 


$100-350 




30 m. 


13 


Dynamic Films, Inc. 




Synd. 


$125-900 





15 m. 



10 or 15 m. 



52 



26 



Woodruff Television Prod. 



Synd. 



RKO-Pathe 



Synd. 



$25-440 



On request 



30 m. 




Continuous 


United Artists 


Synd. 


$70-250 




60 or 


90 m. 


Continuous 


Paramount Television Prod. 


Synd. 


$100-400 




60 m. 




52 


Jerry Fairbanks, Inc. 


Synd. 


On request 




15 m. 




26 


Motion Pictures for TV 


Synd. 


On request 




30 m. 




52 


Station Distributors 


Synd. 


$50-400 




15 m. 




52 


Sterling Television Co., Inc. 


Synd. 


$40-125 




15 m. 




104 


Marted Prod. UTP 


Synd. 


On request 




5 or 15 m. 


26 


Ziv Television 


Synd. 


$37.50-500 




15 m. 




Continuous 


INS-INP TV Dept. 


Synd. 


On request 




15 m. 




Continuous 


INS-INP TV Dept. 


Synd. 


On request 





Women's Shows 



FASHION PREVIEWS 



THE FEMININE ANCLE 



DR. FIXUM HOUSEHOLD HOSPITAL 



FILE FACTS 



YOUR BEAUTY CLINIC 



jTHE FEMININE TOUCH 



15 m. 



15 m. 



15 m. 



5 m. 



15 m. 



15 m. 



Continuous 



Clayton Cousens Prod. 



UTP 



Synd. 



Continuous 



Ilka Chase 



United Artists 



Synd. 



13 



Vogue Wright Studios 



Synd. 



Kling-United 



UTP 



Synd. 



13 



Dynamic Films 



Mot. Pic. for TV 



Synd. 



104 



Sterling Television Co., Inc. 



Synd. 



$50-135 



$55-400 



$50-400 



$7.50-72.50 



On request 



On request 



14 JULY 1952 



191 



PRODUCERS: those knoivn to act as their own sales auent are marked with 

HOLLYWOOD 



Producer 


Address 


j Phone 


Contact 


Producer 


Address 


Phone 


Contact 


M. & A. Alexander 


6040 Sunset Blvd. |HI 3414 
Hollywood 


M. Alexander 


*McConkey Tele-Artists I 1459 N Seward CL 8444 Mack McConkey 
Tele-Artists Musical Novelties 1 Hollywood 


Amos ' ri Andy Productions 

"Amos n' Andy" 


Hal Roach Studios 
Culver City, Cal. 


TE 0-2761 


James Fonda 










Mark 7 Productions 

"Dragnet" 


Republic Studios 
North Hollywood 


SU 3-8411 


Homer Canficld 
Jack Webb 


Apex Film Corp. 

"Lone Ranger" 
"Texas Ranger" 


General Service Studios HE 5106 

1040 N. Las Palmas 

Hollywood 


lack Chertok 


Aborted Productions 

"Double Play" 


Ceneral Service Studio 
1040 N. Las Palmas 
Hollywood 


CR 5-8607 


Marty Martyn 


Bracken Productions 

"Nick Volpe" 


8259 Beverly Blvd. 
Los Angeles 


YO 9433 


Earle Dumont, Jr. 


New World Productions 

"The Best Things in Life" 


5746 Sunset Blvd. 
Hollywood 


HO 9-6369 


Ted Robinson 


* William F. Broidy Prod. 

"Wild Bill Hickok" 
"Case History" 


Sunset Studios 
Hollywood 


HE 6844 


William F. Broidy 


Odyssey Pictures 

"Terry and the Pirates" 


666 N. Robertson Blvd. 
Hollywood 


CR 6-1085 


Sol Lesser 

Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. 




1459 N. Seward 
Hollywood 

140 N. Hollywood Way 
Hollywood 


HE 1177 


Jos. F. McCaughtry 


Cardinal Co. 

"Sleepy |oe" 


bl;i i^.„,_„ i„i, r General Service Studios CR 3111 Phil Krasne 

Phil Krasne-Jack Gross 1(H0 N Las Palmas |ack Cro „ 


Cathedral Films 


CH 8-6637 

HE 5106 


Rev. J. K. Friederick 


B 'S Town Hollywood 






"Religious Series" 


Lindsley Parsons Prod. 

"Files of Jeffrey Jones" 


KTTV Studios 
Hollywood 


HU 2-7111 


Lindsley Parsons 


Jack Chertok Productions General Service Studios 


Jack Chertok 


• Sky K i ng " 10-40 N. Las Palmas 
Hollywood 


P. K. Palmer Productions 

"Brenda Starr" 
"Moon Mullins" 


Goldwyn Studios 
Hollywood 


CR 5111 


P. K. Palmer 

I 


'Commodore Productions 1350 N. Highland Ave. 
' Clyde Beatty Show" Hollywood 


HO 9-8229 
HO 9-6369 

CR 5920 


Walter White, jr. 
Shirley Thomas 

Peter M. Robcck 


Consolidated TV Prod. 

"Cyclone Malone" 
Jump-Jump of Holiday House" 






5746 Sunset Blvd. 
Hollywood 


'Roland Reed Productions Hal Roach Studios 
"Beulah" 275 S. Beverly Drive 
"Mystery Theatre" iBeverly Hills 
"Rocky Jones, Space Ranger" 


It U-Z/bl 


Koland O. Reed 




1566 N. Cordon 
Hollywood 


lerry Courneya 

Everett Crosby 
Charles Brown 


Courneya Productions 

"The Chimps" 

"Close-Up" 

"Worlds of Adventure" 


Revue Prod. (MCA subsid.) la & ,e Lion Studios 
"Kit Carson" Hollywood 
Half-hour adult dramas 


HU 2-2181 


MCA 


* Bing Crosby Enterprises 

"Rebound" 

(sell 1st run only) 


RKO-Pathe Studios 
Culver City 


TE 0-2931 
CR 1-7258 

CR 1-7258 
SU 3-8411 


*Hal Roach Studios, Inc. 

"The Children's Hour" 


8822 Washington Blvd. 
Culver City 


VE 8-2185 


Hal Roach 


Roy Rogers Productions 

"Roy Rogers" 


Goldwyn Studios 
Hollywood 


CR 5111 


Roy Rogers 


'Dudley Television Corp. 


9908 Santa Monica Blvd. 
Beverly Hills 


Don McNamara 
Carl Dudley 

Jess Oppenhcimer 
Harold E. Knox 


"This World of Ours" 
"You Could Be Wrong" 


Rosamond Productions 

"Secrets of the French Surete" 
"Annie Oakley & Tagg" 


8913 Sunset Blvd. 
Hollywood 


CR 4 -5 4 oi Davjd Cnudnow 


Desilu Productions 


9908 Santa Monica Blvd 
Beverly Hills 


"1 Love Lucy" 




Columbia Pictures Studio 


HU 2-3111 Ralph Cohn (N.Y.) 
Jules Bricken (Hywd) 


Don/evy Development Corp. 


Republic Studios 
North Hollywood 


.screen (jems i 43g N rj owe r st. 
"TV Disc Jockey Toons" [Hollywood 


"Dangerous Assignment" 


Screen Televideo Prod. 

"Electric Theatre" 


Eagle Lion Studios 
Hollywood 


HU 2-2181 


Cil Ralston 


'Jack Denove Produc- 


General Service Studios 
1040 N. Las Palmas 


CR 3111 


Jack Denove 

Arthur L. Stern 
William Trinr 

Jerry Fairbanks 

Frank Ferrin 

1. Lindenbaum 
John Guedel 


tions 

Programs and commercials 


Hollywood 


* Showcase Productions 

"Racket Squad" 

* Simmel-Meservey, Inc. 

"Ghost Towns, Inc." 

*Snader Productions 

"Dick Tracy" 
Telescriptions 


Hal Roach Studios 
Culver City 


TE 0-2761 


Hal Roach, Jr. 




Hollywood (new firm) 


HU 2-1101 

HO 9-3628 
WE 3-9281 


Este Productions, Inc. 

"Little Orphan Annie" 
"Casoline Alley" 


321 S. Beverly Dr. 
Beverly Hills 


BR 2-3874 


Louis C. Simmel 
Edward C. Simmel 

Louis D. Snader 

; 


177 S. Beverly Drive 
Beverly Hills 


CR 5-1114 


'Jerry Fairbanks Produc- 
tions 


6052 Sunset Blvd. 
Hollywood 


"Front Page Detective 
Hollywood Theatre" 


Sportsvision, Inc. 

All-American Game of the Week 


1176 Highland Ave. 
Hollywood 


HO 9-6369 


Bill Perry 


* Frank Ferrin Co. 


6528 Sunset Blvd. 

8451 Melrose 
Hollywood 


(Football) 


Filmcratt Productions 

"You Bet Your Life" 


*John Sutherland Produc- f 10 ? Occidental Blvd. 

,-. ... Los Angeles 
tions (Documentaries) 


DU 8-5121 


J. Sutherland 


■ 


i in L tl j. 


TE 0-2761 


Pat Costello 


Flying A Pictures, Inc. 

"Gene Autry" 


6920 Sunset Blvd. 
Hollywood 


HE 5694 
HE 5186 


Armand Schaefer 


TCA Productions 

"Abbott & CosKllo' 


Culver City 


"Range Rider" 
"Annie Oakley" 


*Tee Vee Company 
"The Little Theatre" 
"Gi-Ci & Jock" 


211 S. Beverly Dr. 
Beverly Hills 


BR 2-1376 


Cifford Phillips 


John Guedel Productions 


1680 N. Vine 
Hollywood 


John Cucdel 


"Life with Linkletter" 


* Telefilm, Inc. 

"Roving Cameras" 


6030 Hollywood Blvd 
Hollywood 


HO 9-7205 


|. A. Thomas 

1 


Hollywood TV Service, Inc. 

"Commando Cody" 

"Sky Marshall of the Universe" 


4020 Carpenter Ave. 
N. Hollywood 


SU 3-8807 


Morton W. Scott 


Telemount Pictures 

"Cowboy G-Men" 


California Studios 
5255 Clinton St. 
Hollywood 


HO 9-8321 


Steve Donovan 


Johnson-Watson Prod. 

"Hollywood Reel" 


4952 Presidio 
Hollywood 


AX 1 3854 


Coy Watson 


* United Screen Associates 

"Book of Knowledge" 

WDBC Films 

15-minute dramas 

'Adrian Weiss Productions 

"Craig Kennedy. Criminologist" 
"The Thrill of Your Life" 


Hal Roach Studios 
Culver City 


TE 0-2761 


Jesse J. Coldburg 

i 


'Illustrate, Inc. 

"Tclecomics" 

"|im Hardy, Crime Reporter" 


971 La Cienega Blvd. 
Hollywood 


HE 2126 
TE 0-4525 


Donald A. Dewar 


KTTV Studios 
Hollywood 


HU 2-7111 


Edward D. Wood, Jr. 


"Our Lady's Juggler" 


655 N. Fairfax Ave. 
Los Angeles 


WE 5287 


Louis Weiss 
Adrian Weiss 


Imppro, Inc. 

"The Case of Eddie Drake" 


426 N Rockingham Rd. 
Hollywood 


H.il Ro.uh |r 


*Gene Lester Productions 

"Hollywood Closcups" 


1487 N. Vine St. 
Hollywood 


HI 7287 


Cene Lester 
Martin Spcrber 


Rene Williams Productions 

"Invitation Playhouse" 


Goldwyn Studios 
Hollywood 


CR 5111 


Rene Williams 




Frank Wisbar Productions 

"Fireside Theatre" 


Eagle-Lion Studios 
Hollywood 


HO 9-3744 


Frank Wisbar 

1 


Edward Lewis Productions 

"Affairs of China Smith" 


Motion Picture Center 
Hollywood 


HI 9-5981 


Edward Lewis 


"Playhouse of Stars" 


*Ziv TV Programs 

"The Cisco Kid" 
"Boston Blackie" 
"The Unexpected" 


5255 Clinton St. 
Hollywood 


HO 9-8321 


Eddie Davis 


Mack McConkey Prod. 

"Big Time Wrestling from 
Hollywood" 


1459 N. Seward 
Hollywood 


GL 8444 


Mack McConkey 



192 



SPONSOR 



NEW YORK 



Producer 



Address 



Ambassador Films, Inc. 

Short subjects for TV Isold 
through CBS Television Film 
Sales and Sterling Television) 



'Archer Productions, Inc. 

'rograms and commercials 



red Baldwin, Inc. 

Programs 



*Bray Studios, Inc. 

Cartoons, travelogues, nature 



Caravel Films, Inc. 

Made-to-order programs and 
:ommercials 



Zinescope Films 

vlade-to-order programs 

Zlayton W. Cousens 

'rograms for syndication 



118 W. 57th St. 
New York 19 



35 W. 53rd St. 
New York 19 



270 Park Ave. 
New York 17 



729 Seventh Ave. 
New York 19 



730 Fifth Ave. 
New York 19 



42-45 160th St. 
Flushing, N. Y. 



*Demby, Broun & Co. 

Programs for syndication 
•The Saddle Pal Club" 



)ep/cto Films, Inc. 

dade-to-order programs and 
:ommercials 



152 W. 42nd St. 
New York 36 
(Jack-O-Gram Studiosl 



34 E. 51st St. 
New York 22 



254 W. 54th St. 
New York 19 



'Dynamic Films, Inc. 112 W 89th St. 

'rograms sold through syndi- >New York 24 
:ators; made-to-order programs 
md commercials 



Educational Films, Corp. 
of America 

'rograms 



y eter Elgar 

dade-to-order programs 



Explorers Pictures Corp. 

'rograms for syndication 



Jerry Fairbanks Proa. 

See Hollywood listing) 

1 Fairfield Films Inc. 

'DiMaggio's Dugout" 



1501 Broadway 
New York 36 



270 Park Ave. 
New York 17 



1501 Broadway 
New York 36 



551 Fifth Ave. 
New York 17 



40 E. 51st St. 
New York 22 



ederated Television Pro- 40 E. 40th St. 

duct ions. Inc. ! New York 17 

4ade-to-order programs and 
ommercials 



Allen A. Funt, Produc- 
tions 

rograms for syndication 



100 Central Park S. 
New York 19 



Harry S. Goodman Pro- 19 E. 53rd St. 
ductions 

rograms in syndication and 
ommercials 



G-L Enterprises, Inc. 

rograms and commercials 



270 Park 'Ave. 
New York 17 



li & W Television Pro- 307 E. 44th St. 
- ductions. Inc. Ncw York 17 

4ade-to-order programs and 

pen end films 



lolbert Productions 

rograms 



nternational Tele-Film, 
Inc. 

rograms for syndication 



1564 Broadway 
New York 19 



331 Madison Ave. 
New York 17 



am Handy 1775 Broadway 

lade-to-order programs and ,New York 19 
smmercials 



Lalley and Love, Inc. 

rograms and commercials 

14 JULY 1952 



3 E. 57th St. 
New York 22 



Phone 



Contact 



CI 7-1900 



|U 6-2690 



PL 5-9830 



CI 5-4582 



CI 7-6110 



FL 8-1935 



>LA 4-1173 



Eugen Sharin 



Leo Langlois 



Charles Tranum 



|. R. Bray 
Paul A. Bray 



0. I. Pincus 
Frank Seaver 



PL 9-2495 



Ceorge L. Ceorge 
Clayton W. Cousens 

Myron L. Broun 



CO 5-7621 



TR 3-6221 



PE 6-1780 



?L 8-1582 



LO 4-5592 



iohn Hans 



Henry Morley 
Nathan Zucker 



Earl W. Hammons 



Producer 



Address 



Phone 



Contact 



Lewis Sound Films 

Made-to-order programs and 
commercials 



Lion Television Pictures 

Prosrams 



75 W. 45th St. 
New York 17 



"March of Time 

Programs for syndication 



'Charles Michelson, Inc. 

rog.ams for syndication 

* Murphy-Lillis Produc- 
tions, Inc. 

Programs and commercials 



7"ed Nemeth Studios 

ommercials and shorts 



Olio Video Television 
Productions 

Programs for syndication 



Parsonnet Productions 

Programs for syndication; made- 
to-order programs 

* Pilsbury Productions 

Children's programs 

'Bernard J. Prockter 

Programs 



1501 Broadway 
New York 36 



369 Lexington Ave. 
Mew York 17 



15 W. 47th St. 
New York 19 



723 Seventh Ave. 
New York 19 



729 Seventh Ave. 
New York 19 



•0 E. 42nd St. 
Mew York 17 



'01 Seventh Ave. 
<cw Yoik 36 



*RKO Pathe, Inc. 

TV shorts; made-to-order 
programs 



170 E. 79th St. 
New York 21 



221 W. 57th St. 
New York 19 



i25 Madison Ave. 
New York 22 



Peter Elgar 



I. B. Weill 



MU 2-5171 Ceorge Ellis 
EL 5-1884 i Reggie Schuebel 
H. V. Chain 



MU 5-7220 



JU 6-5227 



PL 5-6131 



PL 5-9473 



MU 5-4258 



|U 2-2928 



MU 7-9116 



Allen A. Funl 



Dan Goodman 



Sarra, Inc. 

Made-to-order programs, comml. 



Screen Gems, Inc. 

Made-to-order programs, comml 



Seaboard Studios 

Made-to-order programs, com- 
mercials, musical shorts 

^Skyline Productions 

Programs for syndication 

'Fletcher Smith Studios 

Programs made-to-order and 
for syndication 



Sound Masters, Inc. 

Programs and commercials 

'Special Purpose Films 

Programs and commercials 



'Sterling Television Co. 

Programs tor syndication 



'Wilbur Streech Prod. 

Programs and commercials 



Marion Cering 



Bob Whiteman 



Jerry Albeit 



Paul Moss 



|U 2-4060 



EL 5-1382 



Vincent L. Herman 



lames A. Love 
John B. Lalley 



* Telamerica, Inc. 

'rograms and commercials 



00 E. 56th St. 
Mew York 22 



729 Seventh Ave. 
Mew York 19 



157 E. 69th St. 
Mew York 21 



127 E. 61st St. 
New York 21 



321 E. 44th St. 
New York 17 



165 W. 46th St. 
New York 19 



U W. 56th St. 
New York 19 



316 W. 57th St. 
New York 19 



1697 Broadway 
New York 19 



Telenews Productions, Inc. 

News, sports 



Television Screen Pro- 
ductions 

"|im & |udy in Teleland" 



* Tempo Productions 

'rograms and commercials 

Times Square Prods. 

"Crime Crusaders" 
"Sleep No More" 
"They Can Come Back" 



Transfilm, Inc. 

Made-to-order programs, comml 

; Transv/deo^Corp. of Am. 

Programs 



270 Park Ave. 
Mew York 17 



530 9th Ave. 
Mew York 



17 E. 45th St. 
New York 17 



588 Fifth Ave. 
New York 36 



145 W. 45th St. 
New York 19 



35 W. 45th St. 
New York 19 



2 W. 46th St 
New York 19 



LU 2-1322 Vernon Lewis 



PE 6-1780 E. W. Hammons 



JU 6-1212 



PL 7-0695 



PL 7-8144 



CI 5 5147 Ted Nemeth 



rank Shea 



Charles Michelson 



Owen Murphy 



MU 2-3218 



MU 8-4500 



TR 9-9208 



JU 6-4830 



PL 9 3600 



Harvey Cort 



Marion Parsonnet 

Larry Merchant 
Bernard J. Prockter 



Ed Evans 



MU 8-0385 



CI 5 5044 



RE 7-9200 



TE 8-7550 



MU 5-6626 



PL 7-6600 
JU 6-0020 



JU 6-3750 



Jack Henderson 



Ralph Cohn 



Sanford Johnson 



Robert B. Spafford 



Fletcher Smith 



William F. Crouch 



John Fox 



S. J. Turell 



JU 2-3816 



EL 5-1422 



JU 6-2450 



MU 2-8877 



PL 7-0744 



CI 6-4443 



LU 2-1400 



Wilbur Streech 



Wally Could 
Charles N. Burns 



Charles |. Basch Jr. 



J. Pomerantz 



Charles W. Curran 



LU 2-1281 



Walter Lowendahl 
Paul deFur 

Ceorge Luttinger 



193 



Producer 



Address 



Programs 



Transvideo Corp. of 
America 



2 W. 46th St. 
New York 19 



Phone 

LU 2-1281 



*Van Praag Productions 

Programs, comml. 



Video Varieties Corp. 

Made-to-order programs, comml 



Vidicam Pictures Corp. 

Made-to-order programs 



* Winik Productions 

Madison Square Garden events, 
sold by MCA 



1600 Broadway 
New York 19 



41 E. 50th St. 
New York 22 



240 E. 39th St. 
New York 16 



625 Madison Ave. 
New York 22 



PL 7-2857 



MU 8-1162 



MU 6-3310 



PL 3-0684 



Contact 

George Luttinger 



William Van Praag 



Otis P. Williams 



Ed CarroH 



Leslie Winik 



CHICAGO 



Producer 



Address 



Phone Contact 



* Academy Film Produc- 
tions 

"Bob Elson's Interviews of the 
Century" 



*Berman & Bettenbender 

Commercials, made-to-order 
shows 



* Stuart V. Dawson 

Package programs 



123 W. Chestnut St. 



410 S. Michigan Ave. 



520 N. Michigan Ave. 



* Douglas Productions 

"Movie Quick Quiz" 
"Today's Ballgame" 



1425 S. Racine Ave. 



* Harold R. Gingrich 

Package programs 



* International Wrestling 
Films 

"Wrestling Matches" 

"Raymond Massey Reads the 

Bible" 

Open end and custom films 



520 N. Michigan Ave. 



9 S. Clinton St. 



* Jewell Radio & Television '85 N. Wabash Ave. 
Productions 

Made-to-order shows 



Ml 2-0128 Bernard Howard 



WA 2-7488 



Ml 2-5231 



HA 1-0409 



Ml 2-7021 



AN 3-5337 



Fl 6-4474 



Bernard Berman 



Stuart V. Dawson 



Fred C. Raymond 



Harold R. Cingrich 



Russ Davis 

|ohn R. Cuenther 



lames E. lewell 



Producer 

' Kling Studios 

'Hormel All-Girl Revue" 
'Old American Barn Dance' 



Herbert S. Laufman & Co, 

Mr. Wazard" 



*MCA TV Ltd. 

"Stars Over Hollywood" 
"Famous Playhouse" 



* Morton Television Pro- 
ductions 

'This Is the Story" 



* Movie Advertising Bureau 
United Film Service 

Commercials 



* Sidney J. Page Television 
Productions 

"Your Visiting Nurse" 



* Republic Television Fea- 
tures 



*Sherwin Robert Rodgers 

Commercials 



"Snader Telescription 
Sales Corp. 

'Telescription Library" 
'Washington Spotlight" 
'Dick Tracy" 



Tressel Studio 

"Captain Breeze" 
"Sterling and Silverplate' 



* United Broadcasting Co 

'Mr. Wizard" 

"Old American Barn Dance" 

"Lutheran Hour" 



* Vogue Wright Studios 

"Dr. Fixum" 
"Visiting Nurse" 



Raphael G. Wolff Studios 
of Hollywood 

Commercials, Documentaries 



Address 

601 N. Fairbanks 



Phone 



Contact 



DE 7-0400 Fred Niles 



624 


S. 


Michigan Ave. 


430 


N 


Michigan Ave. 


360 


N 


Michigan Ave. 


333 


N 


Michigan Ave. 



WE 9-2302 Herbert S. Laufman 



DE 7-1100 



CE 6-4144 



M. B. Lipsey 
Raoul Kent 



Mr. Morton 



203 N. Wabash Ave. 



ST 2-7344 



lack |. Page 



64 E. Lake St. 



720 N. Michigan Ave. 



ST 2-0460 



SU 7-5706 



Capico Kapps 



59 E. Van Buren 



S. R. Rodgers 



WE 9-5466 George Fisher 



59 W. Hubbard St. su 7.1297 



301 E. Erie St. 



SU 7-9114 



469 E. Ohio St. 



221 N. LaSalle St. 



George Tressel 



William L. Klein 



MO 4-5600 Ceorge T. Becker 



RA 6-4626 Carl W. Webster 



FILM COMMERCIAL PRODUCERS: cross-section of firms and their clients 



HOLLYWOOD 



Producer 


Address 


Phone 


Clients* 


Jerry Fairbanks Inc. 


6052 Sunset Blvd. 


HU 2-1101 


White Owl Cigars 


Paul J. Fennell Inc. 


1159 N Highlands Ave. 


GL 1657 


General Foods 


Filmcratt Productions 


8451 Melrose 


WE 3-9281 


Standard Oil Co. of 
California 


Five Star Productions 


6526 Sunset Blvd 


HE 4807 


Cory Corp. 


Roland Reed Productions 


275 S. Beverly Drive 


CR 6-1101 


General Mills 
Sterling Drug 


Hal Roach Studios Inc. 


8822 W. Washington Blvd. 


TE 0-2761 


Liebmann Breweries 


Screen Televideo Products 


328 S. Beverly Drive 


HI 1158 


DuPont 


John Sutherland Produc- 
tions 


201 N. Occidental Blvd. 


DU 2-8211 


United Fruit 


United Productions of 
America 


40 W. Olive Ave. 


CH 7171 


Brewing Corp. of 
America 



N EW YORK 



Producer 



Address 



Phone 



Clients* 



American Film Producers '600 Broadway 



PL 7-5915 



Animated Productions 



Audio Productions 



194 



1600 Broadway 



630 9th Ave. 



CO 5-2942 



CO 5-6771 



Palm Beach Co. 
Servel Inc. 



Kclvinator 



Borden 



Prodi 



Address 



Phone 



Caravel Films 



Shamus Culhane Produc- 
tions 



Depicto Films 



Peter Elgar Productions 



Elliot, Unger & Elliot 



Film Graphics 



Filmwright Productions 
Hankinson Studio 
Hartley Productions 



International Movie Pro- 
ducers Service 



Kaleb Film Co. 



730 5th Ave. 



207 E. 37th St. 



364 W. 54th St. 



18 E. 53rd St. 



130 W. 57th St. 



245 W. 55th St. 



CI 7-6110 



MU 2-8243 



CO 5-7621 



MU 8-5626 



|U 6-5582 



|U 6-1922 



3 E. 57th St. 



15 W. 46th St. 



20 W. 47th St. 



515 Madison Ave. 



19 W. 44th St. 



EL 5-6038 



|U 6-0133 



|U 2-3960 



EL 5-6620 



Contact 



Borden 

Johnson & Johnson 
American Tobacco 
Socony Vacuum Oil 
Toni Home Permanen 



Standard Brands Inc 
Chesebrough Mfg. 
Lever Bros. 



Bristol-Myers 
Prince Gardner 
( billfolds) 



Woodbury 



Lever Bros. 



Goodyear Tire & 

Rubber 
Aluminum Cooking 

Utensil 
Commercial Solvents 

Corp. 



Procter & Gamble 
General Foods 



Brewing Corp. of 
America 



DuPont 

Celanese Corp. of 

America 
Bayuk Cigar 



Standard Brands 



MU 2-0144 Coca Cola Bottling 
Co. of New York 



SPONSOR 



Producer 
Kcnco Productions 



Herbert Kerkow 



Robert Lawrence Produc- 
tions 



Lewis Sound Films 



MPO Productions 



National Screen Service 
Corp. 



Ted Nemeth Studios 



Gray-O'Reilly Studio 



RKO Pathe 



Sarra Inc. 



Screen Gems Inc. 



Seaboard Studios 



Address 

333 W. 52nd St. 



480 Lexington Ave. 



418 W. 54th St. 



75 W. 45th St. 



15 E. 53rd St. 



1600 Broadway 



729 7th Ave. 



480 Lexington Ave. 



625 Madison Ave. 



200 E. 56th St. 



729 7th Ave. 



157 E. 69th St. 



Fletcher Smith Studios 



Sound Masters Inc. 



Wilbur Streech Produc- 
tions 



321 E. 44th St. 



165 W. 46th St. 



1697 Broadway 



Phone 



Contact 



PL 7-8466 R. |. Reynolds To- 
bacco 
Procter & Camble 



EL 5-0683 



JU 2-5242 



Conoco 



Lite magazine 
R. ). Reynolds To- 
bacco 



LU 2-1322 Emerson Drug 
Polaroid 
Schaefer 
Wildroot 



MU 8-7830 



CI 6-5700 



CI 5-5147 



Nash 



General Electric 



Ceneral Electric 
Ronson 

Celanese Corp. ot 
America 



PL 3-1531 



American Chicle 
Campbell Soup 
Ceneral Mills 



PL 9-3600 



MU 8-0085 



CI 5-5044 



RE 7-9200 



MU 5-6626 



PL 7-6600 



|U 2-3816 






Armour 



Universal Cas Range 

Mars Inc. 

Pure Oil Products 

Cold Seal Co. 

Stopette 



Procter & Camble 
Schlitz Brewing 
BVD Co. 
DuPont 



Minute Rice 
Nash 



Bristol-Myers 



Bristol-Myers 



B.iyuk Cigar 
Cities Service 



Producer 
Bill Sturm Studios 



Addr 

734 Broadway 



Telamerica Inc. 



Television Graphics 



Tempo Productions 



Transtilm 



Video Varieties 



Vidicam Pictures Corp. 



270 Park Ave. 



245 W. 55th St. 



588 5th Ave. 



35 W. 45th St. 



41 E. 50th St. 



240 E. 39th St. 



Phone 

OR 7-7270 



Contact 



EL 5-1422 



IU 6-1922 



PL 7-0744 



LU 2-1400 



MU 8-1162 



MU 6-3310 



American Tobacco 
Curtis Publishing 
Seaforth 

R- I Reynolds To- 
bacco 

Colgate-Palmolive- 
Peet 

Procter b Camble 

R- |. Reynolds To- 
bacco 



American Tobacco 

Zippo 

Wildroot 



National Carbon 
Jacques Kreisler 
Corp. 



Falstaff Brewing 



Swans Down (cake 

mixes) 
RDX 
Personal Products 



CHICAGO 



Producer 



Chicago Film Lab Inc. 



Kling Studios 



United Broadcasting Co. 



Vogue-Wright Studios 



Address 



Phone 



56 E. Superior St. 



WH 4-6971 



601 N. Fairbanks 



301 E. Erie 



237 E. Ontario 



DE 7-0400 



SU 7-9114 



Clients* 



O'Cedar 
Allis-Chalmers 
Swift 
Nescafe 
Quaker Oats 
Elgin Watch 



Admiral 
Brach Candy 
Illinois Meat Co. 
National Radiator 
Marshall Field 



Greyhound Bus 



DE 7-8350 C. A. Swanson 
Spring Air Co. 



- 



- 



FILM MUSIC 

sound track 
for use in films 



• Dramatic Shows 

• Sport Shows 

• Video Spots, etc. 

Used Exclusively By 

| NBC-TV I 

March ot Time TV 
and others 

I FILMUSIC CO. 1 

6 79 W. 54th St., New York City 

JUdson 6-4155-6 

in Hollywood Hillside 4687 

"one of the world's largest 
music -on -track libraries" 

14 JULY 1952 



Film Libraries-/ 

Now is the time to CHECK your prints \f 



Are some of your old films 

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If the answer is "Yes" to any of these questions, 
your next step is to have such films 

PEERLESS- Serviced 

Services include cleaning... repairs... rehumidifica- 
tion... scratch removal. ..and the famous Peerless- 
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makes your films screen better and last longer. 



JEERLESS 

FILM PROCESSING CORPORATION 

165 WEST 46th STREET, NEW YORK 36, NEW YORK 
959 SEWARD STREET, HOLLYWOOD 38, CALIF. 



When you write, please meniion size of your library and 

maximum number of prints you could spare at one time, for 

cleaning and treatment. 



195 



SYNDICATORS: 



sales agents for their own shows and/or for shows filmed by others 



Syndicator 



Shows available and length (in minutes) 



Beacon Television Features 

420 Boylston St. 

Boston, Mass. 

Commonwealth 6-6881 

B. C. Keane 

CBS Television Film Sales 

485 Madison Ave. 
New York 22, N. Y. 
PLaza 5-2000 
Fred Mahlstedt, Director 



Consolidated TV Sales 

Sunset at Van Ness 
Hollywood 28. Cal. 
Hollywood 9-6369 
Peter M. Robeck, Nat'l Sis Mgr. 

New York Office: 

25 Vanderbilt Ave. 

New York 17, N. Y. 

Murray Hill 6-7543 

Halsey V. Barrett, East. Sis. Mgr. 



DuMont Film Department 

515 Madison Ave. 

New York 22, N. Y. 

Murray Hill 8-2600 

Donald A. Stewart, Coordinator 



DuMont Teletranscription 

i Same address and phone as above) 
Bob Woolf, Manager 



Jerry Fairbanks, Inc. 

6052 Sunset Blvd. 
Hollywood, Calif. 
Hudson 2-1101 
George Ellis, Sis. Mgr. 
N. Y. Office: 
551 Fifth Avenue 
New York 17, N. Y. 
MU 2-5171 



Guild Films, Inc. 

5746 Sunset Blvd. 
Hollywood, Cal. 
510 Madison Ave. 
New York 22, N. Y. 
PLaza 3-4170 
Rubin R. Kaufman 
Nat V. Donato 

INS — Telenews 

235 E. 45th St. 
New York 17, N. Y. 
Murray Hill 7-8800 
Robert Reid 



Major TV Productions, Inc 

RKO Pathc Studios 

Culver City, Cal. 

N. Y. Office: 

RKO Building 

New York 26, N. Y. 

PLaza 7-6990 

Mauric Cresham, C en. Sis. Mgr. 

March of Time 

369 Lexington Ave. 

New York 17, N. Y. 

Judson 6-1212 

Frank Shea, Sis. Mgr. 



Charles Michelson, Inc. 

15 W. 47th St. 
New York 19, N. Y. 
PLaza 7-0695 
Charles Michelson 



Monogram Pictures Corp. 

1560 Broadway 
New York 19, N. Y. 
PLaza 7-3070 
Lloyd Lind 



William Morris Agency 

1740 Broadway 

New York 19, N. Y. 

ludson 6-5100 



Coin' Places with Gadabout Caddis — 15 m. 



Gene Autry — 30 m. 
Holiday in Paris — 30 m. 
Hollywood on the Line — 15 m. 
Range Rider — 30 m. 
Strange Adventure — 15 or 30 m. 
The Case of Eddie Drake — 30 m. 
The Files of Jeffrey Jones — 30 m. 
Vienna Philharmonic — 15 m. 
World's Immortal Operas — 30 m. 



The Best Things in Life— 15 or 30 m. 

Jump Jump of Holiday House — 15-m. strip 

The Adventures of Cyclone Malone — 15-m. strip 

The All-American Football Came of the Week — 30 m. 



Hy-Lights— 15 m. 

Scotland Yard — 30 m. 

Speed Classics — 30 m. 

Weather Forecast Jingles — 30 sec. 

Jingle Dingle — 15 sec. 

Holiday of Dreams — 5 m. 

In the Fashion Spotlight — 5 m. 

Streamlined Fairy Tales — 15 m. 



• Shows available only to DuMont affiliates! 
Rocky King, Detective — 30 m. dim. availability) 
Johns Hopkins Science Review — 30 m. (sustaining) 
Pentagon-Washington — 30 m. i sustaining! 
Life Is Worth Living — 30 m. (sustaining) 



Crusader Rabbit — 5-m. strip 

Front Page Detective — 30 m. 

Going Places with Uncle George — 10 m. 

Hollywood Half Hour — 30 m. 

Hollywood Theatre — 30 m. 

Jackson and Jill — 30 m. 

Paradise Island — 15 m. 

Public Prosecutor — 15 m. 

Ringside with the Rasslers — 60 m. 

Television Closcups — 5 m. 



The Guild Theatre — 30 m. 

Hello, Darling — 15 m. 

Gallagher's Travels — 15 m 

Close-Up — 15 m. 

Adventures in Storyland — 15 m. 

Lash of the West — 15 m. 

Guild Sports Library (400 selections) 



Telenews Daily — 12 m. 
Telenews Weekly Review — 18 m. 
This Week in Sports — 15 m. 
All Nations Symphonies — 15 m. 



It's a Small World 
Feature Films 
Thrilling Bible Dramas 



Crusade in the Pacific — 30 m. 

March of Time Through the Years — 30 m. 

Ballet in France — 15 m. 

American Wit & Humor — 15 m. 



Capsule Mysteries — 5 m. 
Blackstone. the Magician — 15 m. 
Highlights of Famous Diamonds — 1 m. 



Alaska — 76 m. 

And So They Were Married — 79 m. 

Betrayed — 67 m. 

China's Little Devils — 75 m. 

Forever Yours — 84 m. 

I Killed That Man— 71 m. 

Klondike Fury — 63 m. 

Lady Let's Dance — 85 m. 

The Unknown Cuest — 64 m. 

Federal Bullets — 61 m. 



All types of dramatic shows — 15 and 30 m. 



Motion Pictures tor TV 

655 Madison Ave. 
New York 22. N. Y. 
Templeton 8-2000 
Sy Wcintraub 

Music Corp. of America 

Syndication Dcpt. 
598 Madison Ave. 
New York 22, N. Y. 
Plaza 9-7500 
D3VC Sutton 



Funny Bunnies — 5 or 15 m. 
Ship's Reporter — 15 m. strip 
Superman — 30 m. 
The Clue — 15 m. 
Wrestling Highlights — 15 m. 
Your Beauty Clinic — 15 m. 



NBC Film Syndication Div. 

30 Rockefeller Plaza 
New York 20, N. Y. 
Circle 7-8300 
John B. Cron 



Over 200 dramas under your own program title — 30 m. 

(mystery, melodrama, comedy, adventure) 
Kit Carson — 30 m. 
Man in the Iron Mask — 30 m. 



Dangerous Assignment — 30 m. 
Hopalong Cassidy — 60 m. 
The Daily News Review — 71-i m. strip 
NBC News Review of the Week — 12'/2 I 



Syndicator 



Official Films 

25 W. 45th St. 
New York 36, N. Y 
PLaza 7-0100 



Inc. 



Shows available and length (in minutes) 



Four Star Playhouse — 30 m. 
Robert Cummings Show — 30 m. 
Impulse — 30 m. 
Terry & The Pirates — 30 m. 
Joe E. Brown Show — 30 m. 
Secret File U. S. A— 30 m 
Tales of Robin Hood — 30 m. 
Rocky Jones. Space Ranger — 30 m. 



William R. Coodheart, 


r- 


Willie Wonderful— 15 m. 

Female of the Species — 30 m. 

Lucy Chase, Woman Investigator — 30 m. 

Love Story Theatre — 30 m. 






Confessions Theatre — 30 m 


Paramount Televisi 


on Prod. 




1501 Broadway 




Time for Beany — 15 m. strip 


New York 36. N. Y. 




Wrestling from Hollywood — 20 m. or 60 m. 


Bryant 9-8700 




Hollywood Reel — 15 m. 


John Howell 






Peerless Television 


Prod. 




729 Seventh Ave. 






New York 19, N. Y. 




on request 


Plaza 7-2765 






George Shupert 






PSI-TV 




68 British features 


221 W. 57th St. 




Foodini The Croat — 30-15 m. 


New York 19 




American Sports Show — 15 m. 


JU 6-4830 




China Smith — 30 m. 


Andrew P. Jaeger 






RKO-Pathe, Inc. 






625 Madison Ave. 






New York 22, N. Y. 




Sportreels — 10 or 15 m. 


PLaza 9-3600 






Edward Evans 






Screen Gems, Inc. 






729 Seventh Ave. 






New York 19, N. Y. 




TV Disc Jockey Toons — 3 '4 m. 


Circle 5-5044 




Music to Remember — 30 m. 


Ralph Colin 




Hollywood Newsrecl — 15 m. 


1438 N. Cower 






Hollywood, Cal. 






Jules Bricken 







Simmei-Meservey, Inc. 

321 S. Beverly Drive 
Beverly Hills. Cal. 
Bradshaw 2-3874 
Louis C Sinimel, Pres. 



Snader Telescription Sales 

328 S. Beverly Drive 
Beverly Hills. Cal. 
CR 5-1114 
N. Y. Office: 
229 W. 42nd St. 
Longacre 4-3971 
New York 36, N. Y. 
E. Johnny Graff 

Specialty Television Films 

1501 Broadway 
New York 36, N. Y. 
LOngacre 4-5592 
Jules B. Weill 



Ghost Towns of the West — 15 m. 



Telescriptions Library =1 — 3V4 m. 
Telescriptions Library -2 — 31/g m. 
Dick Tracy — 30 m. 
Washington Spotlight — 15 m. 
This is the Story — 15 m. 
Kid Magic — 15 m. 
Dr. Fixum — 15 m. 



Station Distributors, Inc. 

40 E. 51st St. 
New York 22. N. Y. 
Plaza 9-4953 
J.iv Williams 



Buster Crabbe Show — 30 m. 
Big Game Hunt — 30 m. 
Feature Films 



Football This Week— 15 m. 

Tom Tyler — 30 m. 

Roller Derby — 30 m. 

Maggi McNellis — What's Playing — 15 m. 



Sterling Television Co., Inc. 

316 W. 57th St. 
New York 19. N. Y. 
ludson 6-3750 
S. J. Turell 



Enchanted Music — 30 m. 

Cafe Continental — 15 m. 

Armchair Adventure — 30 m. 

Handy Andy — 15 m. 

Vienna Choir Boys and the Salzburg Marionettes- 

30 m. 
Sports on Parade — 15 m. 
What's the Record— 3' 2 m. 
Junior Crossroads — 15 or 30 m. 
The Feminine Touch — 15 m. 
King's Crossroads — 30 m. 
Meet the Victim — 15 m. 



Syndicated Television Prod. 

1000 Cahuenga Blvd. 
Hollywood 38. Cal. 
Maury Cresham 

TV-Unlimited, Inc. 

341 Madison Ave. 
New York 17, N. Y. 
MU 3-3881 
Herbert Rosen 



Invitation Playhouse — 15 m. 



TeeVee Company 

445 Park Ave. 

New York 22 N. Y. 

PLaza 9-8000 

Saul Reiss 

J. Walter Thompson Co. 

420 Lexington Ave. 

New York 17. N. Y. 

MUrray Hill 3-2000 

Howard Reilly 



Vienna Musicals 
Famous Operas & Operettas 
Adventures in Stamps 
Paris Fashion Parade 



Little Theatre— 15 m. 



Foreign Intrigue — 30 m. 



20th Century 
Corp. 

444 W. 56th St. 
New York 
CO 5-3320 
Peter Levathes 
Phil Williams 



Fox Film 



Crusade in Europe — 30 m. 
Children's Newsrecl — 15 m. 



United Artists Television 

729 Seventh Ave. 
New York 19, N. Y. 
Circle 5-6000 
J. Mitchell 



John Kieran's Kaleidoscope — 15 m. 

Telesports Digest — 30 m. 

Unk & Andy — 15 m. 

The Feminine Angle — 15 m. 

Washington Close-up — 15 m. 

Tele-Disc Jockey — 3 m. 

Clete Roberts World Report— 15 m. 

View the Clue— 15 m. 



Syndicates 



Shows available and length (in minutes) 



Newsreels — 12-15 m. 



United Press-Movietone 

220 E. 42nd St. 
New York 17, N. Y. 
Murray Hill 2-0400 
LeRov Keller 

United Television Programs Cowboy C-Men— 30 m. 
444 Madison Ave. J h e, Chimps— 15 m. 

New York 22, N. Y. Hollywood Off-Beat — 30 m. 

Plaza 3-4620 Fashion Previews — 15 m. 

Aaron Beckwith R °V al Playhouse— 30 m. 

Rebound — 30 m. 



United World Films 

445 Park Ave. 
New York 22, N. Y. 
Plaza 9-8000 
Norman Cluck 

Vogue-Wright Studios 

469 E. Ohio St. 
Chicago, III. 
MOhawk 4-5600 
Lloyd C. Nelson 



Old American Barn Dance — 30 m. Big Town — 30 m. 



Sleepy |oe — 30 m 

Movie Quick Quiz — 15 m. 

Double Play with Durochcr & Day — 15 m. 

File Facts — 5 m. 

Worlds of Adventure — 15 m. 

Paradox — 5 m. 



Sports Schoiar — 15 m. 
Stranger than Fiction — 15 m. 
Headlines on Parade — 15 m. 



Coing Places — 15 m. 
Football Extras — 5 m. 
The Fighting Man — 30 m. 



Dr. Fixum Household Hospital — 15 m. 



Louis Weiss & Co. 

655 N. Fairfax Ave. 
Los Angeles 36, Cal. 
WEbster 5287 
Louis Weiss 

Woodruff Television Prod. 

1022 Forbes St. 
Pittsburgh 19, Pa. 
Court 1-3757 
R. C. Woodruff 

Ziv Television 

488 Madison Ave. 
New York 22. N. Y. 
Murray Hill 8-4700 
Kurr Blomberg 



Craig Kennedy, Criminologist — 30 m. 
The Thrill of Your Life— 30 m. 



The Soortsman's Club — 15 
Your TV Theatre— 30 m. 



Boston Blackie — 30 m. 
The Cisco Kid— 30 m. 
Sports Album — 5 and 15 m 
Story Theatre — 30 m. 



Yesterday's Newsreel — 15 m. 
The Unexpected — 30 m. 
The Living Book — 30 m. 
Walter Lantz Cartoons — 10 m 



*Some producers sell their own shows. See producers list in previous section. 

ALLIED SERVICES: 

Cross-section of firms ttiiling producers ( \»»«r York only) 

CAMERAS (accessories, sales, rentals, etc.) 

Camera Equipment Co., 1600 Broadway, JU 6-1420 

Camera Mart, Inc., 70 W. 45th St., MU 7-7490 

J. A. Maurer, Inc., 37-01 31st St. (Long Island City), ST 4-4600 

National Cine Equipment, Inc., 20 W. 22nd St., OR 5-0677 

Ruby Camera Exchange, Inc., 729 7th Ave., CI 5-5640 

S.O.S. Cinema Supply Corp, 602 W. 52nd St., PL 7-0440 

FILM LABORATORIES 

Consolidated Film Industries, Division of Republic Pictures Corp., 1740 

Broadway, JU 6-1700 
De Luxe Labs.. Inc.. 850 10th Ave., CI 7-3220 
Du Art Film Labs.. 245 W. 55th St.. PL 7-4580 
Filmlab. Inc., 126 W. 46 St., LU 2-2863 
Guffanti Film Labs.. Inc., 630 9th Ave.. CO 5-5530 
Mecca Film Labs.. Inc.. 630 9th Ave.. CI 6-5289 
Mercury Film Labs.. Inc.. 723 7th Ave.. CI 5-4930 
Movielab Film Labs., Inc.. 619 W. 54th St.. JU 6-0360 
Pathe Labs.. Inc.. 105 E. 106th St.. TR 6-1120 
Precision Film Labs.. Inc.. 1600 Broadway. JU 6-2788 



MISCELLANEOUS FILM SERVICES 



(treatment, titling, ship- 
ping, storage, etc) 



Bonded Film Storage Co.. Inc., 630 9th Ave.. JU 6-1030 
Comprehensive Service Corp.. 245 W. 45th St., CO 5-6767 
Modern Talking Picture Service, 45 Rockefeller Plaza. JU 6-5530 
National Screen Service Corp.. 1600 Broadway, CI 6-5700 
Peerless Film Processing Corp., 165 W. 46th St., PL 7-3630 
Titra Film Labs.. Inc., 1600 Broadway, JU 6-2788 
Vacuumate Corp.. 446 W. 43rd St.. LO 4-1886 
Video Expediting & Library Service, Inc., 141 E. 44th St.. MU 7-0554 



1 Du Mont Television 
Film Sales 

I 



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In thr Entire Country! 



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MAY ... 8 Sales Reps! 

JUNE ... 10 Sales Reps! 
JULY... 15 Sales Reps! 



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Film Sales 

515 Madison Ave., N. Y., MU-8-2600 



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New type weekly TV film show 
series (15 minutes) features: 



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each week through mailed audi- 
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Write or phone for full infor- 
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3 East 57th Street 
New York 22, N. Y. Eldorado 5-1382 [ 



14 JULY 1952 



197 



FILM TRENDS 

I Continued from page 187 I 

Q. Will Hollywood or New York 
eventually become the center of 
TV film operations? 

A. Andy Jaeger of Procktor Produc- 
tions says. "If you utilized all the stu- 
dios in New York, Hollywood, Rome, 
Buenos Aires, Berlin, and London, 
there wouldn't be enough space to 
make film to meet all needs." Hence 
both centers will play important roles, 
each in its own way. 



Q. What are some of the top ad- 
vertising agencymen's viewpoints 
on live vs. film programing? 

A. Walter Craig. Benton & Bowles 
radio-TV vice president, says "There's 
a certain quality of personal being that 
comes through in a live performance. 
Furthermore there's a satisfaction to 
the viewer in knowing that a show is 
being done for them right now. That's 
why a good Broadway play draws 
capacit) audiences at prices ranging 
up to $7.20 a seat." 

Lewis H. Titterton, Compton's vice 
president-director of radio-TV, be- 




c 



a r a ve I 

e evision 



— gives you the exclusive 
services of a specialized TV depart- 
ment staffed by people who confine 
their talents to your TV film requirements. 

This department works for you through Frank 
Seaver, vice-president, and Calhoun McKean, 
executive producer, — 

- backed by 30 years of Caravel 
production know how. 

CARAVEL FILMS, INC. 



730 Fifth Ave. 



Circle 7-6111 



lieves that straight audience participa- 
tion shows come off best live, but that 
comedians, drama, and variety shows 
can best be done on film. 



Q. What are some typical exam- 
ples of sponsors who are placing 
film programs via spot TV? 

A. Here are three representative cases 
of sponsors who have chosen the spot 
TV film path, rather than network pro- 
graming, as their vehicle: 

1. Packard Motor Company, after 
some bitter experiences in both net- 
work program qualih and in clearing 
network TV time, has been airing a 
film program, Rebound, in some 19 
major markets. These cities — which 
range from New York to Seattle — are 
all areas in which Packard's potential 
for results was highest, based on their 
past sales records. In 14 of the 19 
markets. Packard I via Maxon agency) 
is on the air on Thursdays, Fridays, 
and Saturdays. This is important to 
the motor firm since viewers are 
reached in time for them to stop at 
dealers and look over the new models 
on the weekend. 

2. Ballantine, long a pioneer in spot 
TV programing (primarily using 
sports), is "national' in the sense that 
its beer and ale is advertised and sold 
from coast to coast. However, its 
heaviest sales and heaviest competition, 
particularly in ale sales, is in the East. 
To bolster nearly a dozen Eastern mar- 
kets. Ballantine bought the slickly- 
produced Foreign Intrigue series, sub- 
sidizing production from the begin- 
ning. Then, through J. Walter Thomp- 
son, the program was placed on a spot 
basis, often crossing network lines to 
do it. Some choice slotting has re- 
sulted. Sample: At 10:30 p.m. on 
Thursdays. WNBT. New York. This 
takes advantage, in somewhat marginal 
time, of the accumulated "block view- 
ing" to earlier TV mysteries on the 
same night, such as T-Men in Action, 
Gangbusters. and Martin Kane. Mean- 
while, agency and client have syndi- 
cated the show in other markets to 
other advertisers and are doing much 
to recoup the show's costs, which aver- 
age around $22,000 to $25,000 for 
each episode. 

3. Kellogg, not long ago. was about 
to launch a new product, Corn Pops. 
In the competitive field of breakfast 
cereals, where proper advertising sup- 
port and merchandising follow-through 
is a "must," Kellogg decided that a 



198 



SPONSOR 



keystone in the market-by-market in- 
troduction was to be spot program TV. 

Accordingly, Kellogg bought a rous- 
ing Western series, Wild Bill Hickok, 
produced with the classic Hollywood 
know-how in the making of "horse 
operas." The first distribution started 
on the Pacific Coast, and then moved. 
in jumps, toward the East. Placing 
the show through spot channels, Kel- 
logg was able to match closely its TV 
coverage for the product with the 
growing distribution. 

At latest report, Wild Bill Hickok 
had grown from its single-area start 
to cover some 50 major TV markets, 
about 80% of the nation's total TV 
markets. In almost all cases, Kellogg 
had good opportunities and plenty of 
time to pick good TV time slots, occa- 
sionally arranging for the spot buy 
first, and then starting distribution 
later. In all cases, Kellogg got just 
the coverage it wanted — no more. 

For example of how Kellogg ties in 
its program and its merchandising, see 
pictures on page 186 and 187. The 
Battle Creek firm has turned its pack- 
ages into audience promotion for the 
program via pictures of the stars. And, 
in turn, the packages become point-of- 
sale reminders to buy for viewers of 
the show. 

4. Van Camp Sea Food Company, 
for its Chicken of the Sea Brand and 
White Star Brand Tuna, signed last 
month for a sizable film campaign fea- 
turing a new series of Hopalong Cas- 
sidy Westerns. The series is being shot 
now in Hollywood, and will feature 
Bill Boyd as the famous Hoppy in a 
tailored-for-TV format of half-hour 
length. 

The big packing company was quick 
to snap up the series when it was an- 
nounced by NBC-TV Film Syndication 



LAWRENCE F. SHERMAN. JR. 

Motion Picture Editorial Service 

• TELEVISION 

• COMMERCIAL 

• THEATRICAL 

630 Ninth Avenue 

New York 36, N. Y. 

Luxemburg 2-2988 



that a shooting schedule was going to 
start. Hopalong Cassidy has already 
proved a durable vehicle through the 
multiple runs and re-runs of old fea- 
ture-style Westerns in many markets 
for sponsors ranging from General 
Foods to local retailers. 

Present plans of Van Camp call for 
the new series to be televised in al- 
most 50% of the nation's leading TV 
markets, with spot buying being han- 
dled by the firm's ad agency, Brisacher, 
Wheeler. It will be backed heavily 
with publicity and merchandising 
drives. 



Q. Can spot advertisers with film 
shows clear time? 

A. The Katz Agency, which has been 
studying the problem closely, says 
yes — emphatically. They advance the 
case histories of these advertisers as 
proof. The Electric Companies Adver- 
tising Program sponsors Electric The- 
atre (through N. W. Ayer). They have 
33 markets. In 17 of these markets, the 
broadcasts are on between 8:00 and 
10:00 p.m. — local time. In Philadel- 
phia and Wilmington they're on at 
6:00 p.m., Sunday. In four markets 
they start at 11:00 p.m. 

Gruen Playhouse has cleared 35 mar- 
kets on a spot basis. Of the 35 clear- 
ances, 28 are between 7:00 and 11:00 
p.m. Included are such top markets as 
Rochester, St. Louis, New Orleans, 
Seattle, Des Moines, and Boston. 



Q. What looms in the future for 
the feature film rental industry? 

A. According to industry" estimates 
the current film rental business runs 
to about $20,000,000. But this is small 
change compared to what seems des- 
tined for the future. With hundreds 
of local stations slated for operation 
in the next few years, it's certain that 
feature film showings will play a ma- 
jor role in filling up local station pro- 
gram schedules. 

As for supplying the stations with 
film features, there won't be any diffi- 
culty there. Hollywood and British 
moviemakers can supply increased 
needs and, independent movie makers 
like Hal Roach and Edward Small, can 
sell their products a day after they 
finish production, unlike West Coast 
and English products that don't appear 
on TV screens until they're five to 10 
years old. 



Q. How do feature film rental or- 
ganizations determine price? 

A. There is no absolute yardstick for 
determining price and it's pretty much 
a matter of negotiation between the 
film renter and the local station. George 
Shupert, vice president of Peerless 
Television Productions, says price is 
determined by these factors: (1) sta- 
tion's card rate (2) number of sets in 
station's coverage area, (3) number of 
stations in the area. Most important: 
the renting firm's knowledge of a par- 
ticular market. For example, although 
Philadelphia ranks among the first five 
in number of receivers, the prices to 
be gotten there aren't as high as in 
other markets that are further away 
from network lines. 

Peerless rents 26 features in a block 
— none individually — and the rental 
rate is determined in addition to the 
factors mentioned above, by frequency 
of film run — one run in six months, 
two or four runs a year, etc. 

Arche Mayers, president of Unity 
Television Corporation, echoes, Shu- 
pert's sentiments. The future of the 
business promises to be "terrific." 
Price determining factors, he adds, are 
"quality of films, whether they're first 

CALL US 

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■ recorded by full-sized 
orchestras. \-k for catalogue 
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| TV - UNLIMITED, Inc. | 

5 341 Madison Ave., New York 7 7 4 
MU 3-3881 2 

Z * 



14 JULY 1952 



199 




Precision Now Offers 

> 

Unmatched Facilities For 
1 6111111 Processing! 

Here at Precision, we are constantly revising our film processing 
technique; utilizing new engineering principles and new machin- 
ery which enahle us to offer 16mm producers the finest processing 
service they will he aide to find anywhere. 

Here are some of the it«»ir types of et/aip- 
1114'isi that rnahe i*reeision a leader amona 
film proeessina laboratories: 



New I ( >ni in Developing Machines 
automatically operated — Maurer-de- 
signed lo handle the complete range 
of 16mm work — negative or positive 
promptly and efficiently. 

Automatic Temperature and Air 
Control built to a Maurer design. 
Rigidly maintain every technical con- 
dition necessary to the finest 16mm 
procc*>ing. 

Electrically Heated and ( iontrolled 
Drying; Cabinets on each new de- 
veloping machine turn out high 
quality film, waxed and ready for 
immediate projection. 



Precision Film Laboratories — a di- 
vision of J. A. Maurer, Inc., lias 14 
years of specialization in the 1 6mm 
field, consistently meets the latest de- 
mands /or higher quality and speed. 



New Electronic Printer: For the re. 

production of magnetic sound to 
16mm either independently or in 
combination with picture prints. 

New Control Strip Printers operate 

without notching original — produce 
fades a:id dissolves from A&B rolls 
— incorporate filter changes between 
scenes. 



PRECISION 

FILM LABORATORIES, INC. 

21 West 46th St. 

New York 19, N.Y. 

JU 2-3970 



run in that particular area, or whether 
there exists a shortage of film in a cer- 
tain given area."' 

"As for film purchases," says May- 
ers, "that, too, is a matter of negotia- 
tion between ourselves and motion pic- 
ture producers." * * * 



MEN, MONEY, MOTIVES 

{Continued from page 12 I 
under-statement asks the question: 
"How do you budget for advertising 
1 in the L .S.A. I and invest in market 
research (of the U.S.A. I if you see 
every likelihood of losing your invest- 
ment?" 

* * * 

A second speaker at the Advertising 
Federation convention also took up the 
tariff threat. Perle Mesta. our Ameri- 
can Minister to Luxembourg, was con- 
siderably blunter than Sir Miles. "We 
talk about the beauties of free enter- 
prise. And then we put shackles on 
theirs. This is hurting us overseas, 
and I don't think it is doing us any 
good at home. ... It is a situation 
which the Soviets are quick to exploit.'" 

>fc :j; ^ 

Advertising itself tends to be an in- 
ternational industry. There are Ameri- 
can admen colonized in numbers in 
London. Paris. Bonn, Mexico Cit\ . 
and other foreign capitals. British ad- 
vertising brains are directly employed 
in New York, and we don't just mean 
at Hewitt. Ogilvy, Benson & Mather. 
Advertising and advertising men would 
appear to have everything to gain 
from the maximum of freedom in ex- 
port-import terms. They have very 
little to gain from tariff-erected home 
market monopolies. It is not neces- 
sary to name names. Suffice that com- 
panies that kill competition by politi- 
cal string-pulling are not notable for 
meeting competition, or needing to, by 
advertising. 

-fc 'S -H 

Already American television has 
spilled across international boundaries 
into Canada and Mexico. Radio has 
a lively export market (admittedly set 
back a lot by the war and the Com- 
munist upheaval in Asia I , but still the" 
fact is well established that radio pro- 
grams are exportable and importable 
commodities. Let's fight for open 
doors, not closed doors. That way it s 
nicer for more people, and for de- 
mocracy . 



• • • 



200 



SPONSOR 




> WTIC's 50,000 Watts represented nationally by Weed"& Co. • Paul W. Morency, Vice-Pres. — Gen. Mgr., Walter Johnson, Asst. Gen. Mgr.— Sales Mgr. 
14 JULY 1952 201 



In preparing this tabulation on time costs for 
20-second film spots for members, the Association 
of National Advertisers selected that time segment 



as type most commonly used by national adver- 
tisers, and Class "A" because the ANA's radio-TV 
committee felt advertisers were most interested in 



ANA Study of TV time cost-per-1,000 seti 



V/ :. 



City 


Station 

Call 
Letters 


Estimated 
TV Sets in 
Station Area J 




Jan. 1 '51 


.Ian. 1 '52 


Seven Station 








Cities- 








New York 


WNBT 

WCBS-TV 

WJZ-TV 

WABD 

WOR-TV 

WPK 

WATV 


2,050,000 


2,800,000 


Los Angeles 


KNXT" 

KTLA 

KECA-TV 


801,000 


1, 090, 00C 


a - Formerly KTSL 
b-Formerly KFI-TV 


KNBH 
KTTV 
KLAC-TV 
KHJ-TV b 






Four Station 








Cities - 








Chicago 


WBKB 
WNBQ 
WENR-TV 
WGN-TV 


830,000 


1.090,000 


Washington 


WNBW 
WTOP-TV 
WMAL-TV 
WTTG 


220,000 


324. 000 


Three Station 








Cities - 








Philadelphia 


WCAU-TV 

WPTZ 

WFIL-TV 


750,000 


1, 001, 000 


Detroit 


WJBK-TV 

WWJ-TV 

WXYZ-TV 


405, 000 


604.000 


Cleveland 


WEWS 
WXEL 
WNBK 


396,000 


568,000 


Baltimore 


WMAR-TV 
WBAL-TV 
WAAM 


265.000 


358, 000 


San Francisco 


KGO-TV 

KPDC 

KRON-TV 


143,000 


315,000 


Cincinnati 


WCPO-TV 
WKRC-TV 
WLW-T 


220.000 


305, 000 


Columbus 


WBNS-TV 

WLW-C 

WTVN 


120,000 


191, 000 


Atlanta 


WAGA-TV 
WSB-TV 

WLTV 


86, 200 


152,000 


Dallas-Ft. Worth 


WBAP-TV 
WFAA-TV 
KRLD-TV 


100, 600 


149,000 


Two Station 








Cities - 








Boston 


WBZ-TV 
WNAC-TV 


642.000 


848,000 


Minn. -St. Paul 


KSTP-TV 
WTCN-TV 


217, 000 


302, 000 


Dayton 


WHIO-TV 
WLW-D 


107,000 


170, 000 


Syracuse 


WHEN 
WSYR-TV 


95. 100 


160, 000 


Louisville 


WHAS-TV 
WAVE-TV 


73, 300 


122, 000 


Omaha 


KMTV 
WOW-TV 


55, 800 


112,000 



MAXIMUM 


20-Sec. 


Class A Fil 


m Rate 


Jan. 1, 


1951 


Jan. 1, 1952 


Per 


Per M 


Per 


Per M 


Spot ' 


Sets 


Spot " 


Sets 










$500.00 


$.24 


$775.00 


$.28 


525.00 


.26 


775.00 


.28 


425.00 


.21 


550.00 


.20 


350.00 


. 17 


425.00 


. 15 


200.00 


. 10 


200.00 


.07 


185.00 


.09 


200.00 


.07 


130.00 


.06 


130.00 


.05 


80.00 


. 10 


300.00 


.28 


165.00 


.21 


230.00 


.21 


150.00 


. 19 


220.00 


.20 


165.00 


.21 


200.00 


. 18 


150.00 


. 19 


180.00 


. 17 


82.50 


. 10 


115.00 


. 11 


135.00 


. 17 


90.00 


.08 


200.00 


.24 


325.00 


.30 


200.00 


.24 


300.00 


.28 


175.00 


.21 


300.00 


.28 


150.00 


. 18 


200.00 


. 18 


100.00 


.45 


120.00 


.37 


100.00 


.45 


120.00 


.37 


90.00 


.41 


120.00 


.37 


90.00 


.41 


100.00 


.31 


150.00 


.20 


300.00 


.30 


150.00 


.20 


300.00 


.30 


150.00 


. "9 


250.00 


.25 


$190.00 


$.47 


$200.00 


$.33 


200.00 


:49 


200.00 


.33 


150.00 


.37 


200.00 


.33 


125.00 


.32 


165.00 


.29 


125.00 


.32 


160.00 


.28 


120.00 


.30 


150.00 


.26 


100.00 


.38 


150.00 


.42 


100.00 


.38 


125. 00 


.35 


95.00 


.36 


113. 75 


.32 


55.00 


.38 


120.00 


.38 


75.00 


. 52 


120.00 


.38 


80.00 


. 56 


120.00 


.38 


75.00 


.34 


135.00 


. 44 


75.00 


.34 


130.00 


.43 


70.00 


.32 


125.00 


.41 


100.00 


.83 


125.00 


.65 


50.00 


.42 


100.00 


.52 


100.00 


.83 


100.00 


.52 


80.00 


.93 


104.00 


.68 


40.00 


.46 


78.00 


.51 




- 


60.00 


.39 


45.00 


. 45 


80.00 


. 54 


45.00 


.45 


80.00 


.54 


45.00 


.45 


80.00 


. 54 


125.00 


. 19 


250.00 


.29 


150.00 


.23 


250.00 


.29 


$130.00 


$. 60 


$180.00 


$.60 


130.00 


.60 


160.00 


.53 


50.00 


.47 


125.00 


. 74 


50.00 


. 47 


100.00 


.59 


80.00 


. 84 


1 10. 00 


.69 


77.00 


.81 


77.00 


. 48 


65.00 


.89 


100.00 


. 82 


60.00 


.82 


90.00 


. 74 


70.00 


1.25 


80.00 


. 71 


70. 00 


1. 25 


80.00 


. 71 



MINIMUM 


20-Sec. 


Class A Film Rate 


Jan. 1, 


1951 


Jan. 1, 


1952 


Per 


Per M 


Per 


Per M 


Spot 


Sets 


Spot : 


Sets 


$500.00 


$.24 


$775.00 


$.28 


473.81 


.23 


699.43 


.25 


340.00 


. 17 


440.00 


. 16 


262. 50 


. 13 


318.75 


. 11 


150.00 


.07 


150.00 


.05 


148.00 


.07 


140.00 


.05 


99.45 


.05 


110.50 


.04 


64.00 


.08 


270.75 


.25 


132.00 


. 16 


184.00 


. 17 


120.00 


. 15 


176.00 


. 16 


165.00 


.21 


200.' 00 


. 18 


127.50 


. 16 


153.00 


. 14 


64.00 


.08 


89.25 


.08 


101.25 


. 13 


67.50 


.06 


4 

' 160.00 


. 19 


260.00 


.24 


200.00 


.24 


300.00 


.28 


140.00 


. 17 


240.00 


.22 


112.50 


. 14 


150.00 


. 14 


100.00 


.45 


120.00 


.37 


72.00 


.33 


97.20 


.30 


67.50 


.31 


90.00 


.28 


67.50 


.31 


100.00 


.31 


135.00 


. 18 


270.00 


.27 


135.00 


. 18 


270.00 


.27 


135.00 


. 18 


225.00 


.22 


$142. 50 


$.35 


$150.00 


$.25 


150.00 


.37 


150.00 


.25 


105.00 


.26 


140.00 


.23 


106.25 


.27 


145.00 


.26 


87. 50 


.22 


112.00 


.20 


120.00 


.30 


150.00 


.26 


75.00 


.28 


112. 50 


.31 


75.00 


.28 


93.75 


.26 


71.25 


.27 


85.25 


. 24 


44.00 


.31 


96.00 


.30 


75.00 


. 52 


96.00 


.30 


64.00 


.45 


96.00 


.30 


52.50 


.24 


114.75 


.38 


52.50 


.24 


91.00 


.30 


63.00 


.29 


112.50 


.37 


80.00 


.67 


87.50 


.46 


45.00 


.38 


90.00 


.47 


70.00 


.58 


70.00 


.37 


60.00 


.70 


72.80 


.48 


30.00 


.35 


54.60 


.36 




- 


48.00 


.32 


33.75 


.34 


60.00 


.40 


33.75 


.34 


60.00 


.40 


33.75 


.34 


60.00 


.40 


100.00 


. 16 


200.00 


.24 


120.00 


. 19 


200.00 


.24 


$110.50 


$.51 


$153.00 


$. 51 


ilO. 50 


.51 


136.00 


.45 


37.50 


.35 


85.00 


. 50 


45.00 


.42 


90.00 


. 53 


60.00 


.63 


82.50 


.52 


53.90 


.57 


53.90 


.34 


52.00 


.71 


80.00 


.66 


48.00 


.65 


72.00 


.59 


56.00 


1.00 


64.00 


. 57 


52.50 


.94 


60.00 


. 54 



that classification. Potential circulation was useil 
because, among other things, comparable data on 
delivered circulation was not uniformly available 



for all stations. Set figures are from MBC TV net- 
work data charts and the rate information from 
"Television Advertising Rate & Data." 



or 20-second Class "A" film commercials 






111: 






City 


Station 

Call 
Letters 


Estimated 
TV Sets in 
Station Area 3 




|jan. 1 '5 1 


Jan. 1"52 


Birmingham 


WAFM-TV 
WBRC-TV 


37,000 


88, 300 


Davenport- 


WHBF-TV 


38. 500 


85, 100 


Rock Is. - 


WOC -TV 






Moline 








Salt Lake City 


KDYL-TV 
KSL-TV 


36,400 


70. 200 


San Antonio 


WOAI-TV 
KEYL 


37,200 


63.400 


One Station 








Cities - 








St. Louis 


KSD-TV 


239,000 


363.000 


Pittsburgh 


WDTV 


2 12,000 


358,000 


Milwaukee 


WTMJ-TV 


202,000 


306,000 


Buffalo 


WBEN-TV 


171,000 


248,000 


New Haven 


WNHC-TV 


130,000 


224,000 


Schenectady 


WRGB 


133,000 


194, 000 


Providence 


WJAR-TV 


120,000 


191,000 


Indianapolis 


WFBM-TV 


88,900 


188,000 


Kansas City 


WDAF-TV 


93,200 


181.000 


Toledo 


WSPD-TV 


75, 000 


148.000 


Johnstown 


WJAC-TV 


61.300 


133.000 


Lancaster 


WGAL-TV 


76, 500 


131,000 


Rochester 


WHAM-TV 


70, 100 


125,000 


Seattle 


KING-TV 


63, 100 


125,000 


Charlotte 


WBTV 


50,400 


117,000 


Houston 


KPRC-TV 


59, 300 


116,000 


Memphis 


WMCT 


70. 100 


115,000 


San Diego 


KFMB-TV 


76,000 


112,000 


Richmond 


WTVR 


57, 100 


105,000 


Norfolk 


WTAR-TV 


50, 500 


97, 600 


Oklahoma City 


WKY-TV 


68,000 


92,300 


Wilmington 


WDEL-TV 


53, 600 


90,000 


Miami 


WTVJ 


50,000 


82, 000 


Grand Rapids 


WOOD -TV 


70,000 


81,000 


Lansing 


WJIM-TV 


40,000 


80,000 


New Orleans 


WDSU-TV 


47,200 


78,400 


Tulsa 


KOTV 


58,200 


77, 500 


Ames 


WOI-TV 


33, 700 


76,000 


Greensboro 


WFMY-TV 


42,000 


76,000 


Kalamazoo 


WKZO-TV 


31, 100 


69,000 


Huntington 


WSAZ-TV 


32, 500 


66,000 


Utica 


WKTV 


33,000 


64, 000 


Erie 


WICU 


40, 100 


58,900 


Nashville 


WSM-TV 


23,000 


54, 800 


Jacksonville 


WMBR-TV 


26,000 


52, 000 


Binghamton 


WNBF-TV 


31,300 


50,200 


Phoenix 


KPHO-TV 


25. 100 


39,000 


Bloomington 


WTTV 


13, 100 


21,000 


Albuquerque 


KOB-TV 


7,000 


13.000 



[maximum 


20-Sec. 


Class A'Film Rate 


Jan. 1. 


1951 


Jan. 1. 1952 


Per 


Per M 


Per 


Per M 


Spot 


Sets 


Spot 


Sets 


50.00 


1.35 


50.00 


.57 


37.50 


1.01 


50.00 


.57 


35.00 


.91 


60.00 


. 71 


50.00 


1.30 


60.00 


.71 


40.00 


1. 10 


50.00 


.71 


40.00 


1. 10 


48.00 


.68 


45.00 


1.21 


70.00 


1. 10 


35.00 


.94 


65.00 


1.03 


130.00 


. 54 


175.00 


.48 


80.00 


.38 


100.00 


.28 


100.00 


. 50 


150.00 


.49 


$ 82.50 


$.48 


$115.50 


$.47 


120.00 • 


.92 


132.00 


.59 


100.00 


. 75 


100.00 


.52 


50.00 


.42 


•115.00 


.60 


60.00 


.67 


100.00 


. 53 


80.00 


.86 


110.00 


. 61 


80.00 


1.07 


100.00 


.68 


60.00 


.98 


80.00 


.60 


60.00 


.78 


90.00 


.69 


80.00 


1. 14 


120.00 


.96 


55.00 


.87 


100.00 


.80 


50.00 


.99 


100.00 


. 85 


48.00 


.81 


80.00 


.69 


75.00 


1.07 


105.00 


.91 


50.00 


.66 


80.00 


.71 


60.00 


1.05 


90.00' 


.86 


75.00 


1.49 


90.00 


.92 


80.00 


1. 18 


100.00 


1.08 


$ 60.00 


$1. 12 


$ 80.00 


$.39 


65.00 


1.30 


110.00 


1.34 


65.00 


.93 


100.00 


1.23 


40.00 


1.00 


60.00 


. 75 


50.00 


1.06 


65.00 


.83 


30.00 


. 52 


100.00 


1.29 


25.00 


. 74 


80.00 


1.05 


50.00 


1. 19 


65.00 


.86 


40.00 


1.29 


90.00 


1.30 


36.00 


1. 11 


72.00 


1.09 


24.00 


.73 


65.00 


1.02 


65.00 


1.62 


90.00 


1.53 


30.00 


1.30 


50.00 


.91 


40.00 


1.54 


50.00 


.96 


30.00 


.96 


60.00 


1.20 


40.00 


1.59 


60.00 


1.54 


22.00 


1.68 


30.00 


1.42 


20.00 


2.86 


20.00 


1. 54 



MINIMUM 20-Sec. Class A Film Rate 



1 Jan. 1, 1951 


Jan. 1, 1952 


Per 
| Spot ° 


Per M 
Sets 


Per 

Spot 


Per M 
Seta 



42.50 


1. 15 


42.50 


.48 


31.90 


.86 


42.50 


.48 


26.25 


.68 


45.00 


.53 


37.50 


.97 


45.00 


.53 


30.00 


.82 


37. 50 


.53 


34.00 


.93 


40.80 


.58 


36.00 


.97 


56.00 


.88 


29.75 


.80 


52.00 


.82 


97.50 


.41 


131.25 


.36 


64.00 


.30 


80.00 


.22 


100.00 


.50 


150.00 


.49 


$82. 50 


$.48 


$115. 50 


$.47 


90.00 


.69 


99.00 


.44 


80.00 


.60 


80.00 


.41 


40.00 


.33 


92.00 


.48 


45.00 


. 51 


75.00 


.40 


72.00 


. 77 


110.00 


.61 


60.00 


.80 


75.00 


. 51 


45.00 


.73 


60.00 


.45 


40.00 


.52 


67.50 


.52 


68.00 


.97 


96.00 


. 77 


43.00 


.68 


82.00 


.66 


42.50 


.84 


80.00 


.68 


38.40 


.65 


68.00 


.59 


56.25 


.80 


78.75 


.68 


37.50 


.49 


60.00 


.54 


54.00 


.95 


81.00 


.77 


56.25 


1. 11 


67.50 


.69 


60.00 


.88 


75.00 


.81 


$ 40.00 


$.75 


$ 60.00 


$.67 


50.00 


1.00 


85.00 


1.04 


52.00 


. 74 


75.00 


.93 


32.00 


. 80 


48.00 


.60 


41.25 


.87 


53.63 


.68 


27.00 


.46 


85.00 


1. 10 


18.75 


.56 


60.00 


.79 


40.00 


.95 


52.00 


.68 


30.00 


.96 


67.50 


.98 


27.00 


.83 


54.00 


.82 


19.20 


.58 


61.00 


.95 


55.25 


1.38 


90.00 


1.53 


24.00 


1.04 


40.00 


.73 


30.00 


1. 15 


37.50 


.72 


24.00 


.77 


48.00 


.96 


34.00 


1.35 


45.00 


1. 15 


16.00 


1.22 


22.50 


1.07 


14.00 


2.00 


14.00 


1.08 



Pi 




What niff jor problems do you foresee for radio-TV 
tttlvertisers this fall? 



I Vice President in Charge of Advertising 
Andrew Jergens Company 
Cincinnati 



The 

picked panel 

answers 

Mr. Campbell 




Mr. Keyes 



It seems to us 
that the primary 
problem con- 
fronting advertis- 
ers using televi- 
sion and radio 
today is how to 
justify the mount- 
ing costs tomor- 
row. Our clients 
are taking second 
looks at the rate 



of the cost climb. Presumably, in the 
fall, time and production costs in tele- 
vision, at least, will have climbed even 
higher. The advertising agent will have 
to justify to his client — and the client 
to himself — the increased expense in- 
volved in reaching markets with this 
media. This will call for more research 
and sales analysis to determine the di- 
mensions of the viewing audience and 
its viewing habits. 

One of our clients, Revere Copper 
and Brass Incorporated, faced this cost 
problem early this spring and solved it 
only by increasing their television ap- 
propriation. Revere has sponsored 
Meet: the Press, the news panel show. 
For just over two years. The show is 
gent rally regarded as the tops in its 
field and as a network I NBC) produc- 
tion has gained national attention. 
Time costs have doubled since Revere 
undertook sponsorship and program 
costs, while relatively low, have gone 
up commeasuratel) . 

Faced with the problem of mounting 
costs, Revere and the agenc) had to 



jeevaluate the show to determine its 
worth as a means of reaching the pub- 
lic with the Bevere product story. 
Briefly, we all took a hard look and 
decided that in this, a Presidential 
election year, the increased time costs 
would be more than justified. We think 
it obvious that Meet the Press would 
build its audience during the campaign 
year. We felt thus, that Bevere would 
not only be able to increase its "hard 
selling" efforts on behalf of its cook- 
ing utensil line, but the company itself 
would gain much added prestige to be 
identified as the sponsor of this top 
public service program at such an im- 
portant time. 

Increasing an appropriation is a 
pleasant, but b\ no means the satisfac- 
tory, way of meeting such a problem. 
We propose to take a hard second look 
at it at the end of the year. We may 
find that it is necessary to return to 
radio which still has appeal and which, 
with regional networks and joint par- 
ticipation deals, may be very attractive 
indeed in 1953. 

Stanley J. Keyes. Jr. 

Executive vice president 

St. Georges & Keyes, Inc. 

New York 



The basic prob- 
lem is an old one 
that is reappear- 
ing once more in 
all types of bus- 
iness - how to 
sell more effec- 
tively than com- 
petition! Sound, 
aggressive leader- 
ship from the top 
down must be the 




Mr. Mahoney 



keynote of the fall operation. No soft- 
ies or plain ordertakers have any place 
in this program. Everyone associated 
with radio or television advertising has 
to sell. Management must set definite 
goals and sell their own organizations 
on these plans before anyone else — cli- 
ent or agency — can be sold. 

Constant realization that the race 
still goes to the swiftest. Initiative, 
daring, and intelligence will be the 
tools of the successful. In our type of 
competitive, result-minded economy, 
some groups will succeed, while others 
fall back. New innovations, gimmicks, 
merchandising tie-ups, service to the 
community, benefits to the advertisers 
— some tangible selling advantages 
must be exploited. Complacency or 
fear of mistakes — both breed the same 
malady — stagnation. 

This is a dollar-and-cents business. 
Theories, generalities, and fondly re- 
membered success stories of the "good 
old days" are out. Advertising costs 
dollars, and air advertising should pro- 
duce sales dollars. I believe it does, 
but I think it can be more fully demon- 
strated. Coverage maps, ratings, and 
rates are very important; but we do 
not need reps or stations primarily to 
give us that information. Tell us how 
other advertisers are getting more out 
of their dollar; show us how we can 
effectively promote radio or television 
advertising as a selling force to our 
clients. 

Sell with ideas and constructive 
imagination, but sell . . . sell . . . sell. 
The smart salesmen and merchandisers 
will draw the aces and win the pot. 
David J. Mahoney 
President 

David J. Mahoney, Inc. 
New York 



204 



SPONSOR 




Mr. Hilton 



The problem our 
clients and other 
advertisers are 
experiencing this 
fall with respect 
to television are 
all related to the 
single word cost. 
It will be a re- 
sourceful agency 
and advertising 
manager who is 
able to steer a modest budget advertis- 
er into television this fall. 

To sidestep the high cost of this me- 
dium, our clients this fall will be using 
Class C time spots; participations on 
daytime shows with the principal deliv- 
ering the commercial; inexpensive au- 
dience participation in quiz shows; 
alternate-week sponsorship. 

Peter Hilton 
President 
Hilton & Riggio 
Neiv York 



The problem, as 
I see it, for cur- 
rent radio and 
television adver- 
tisers is more 
acute than ever. 
We all know that 
TV costs are still 
spiralling ... at 
the same time 
that radio costs 
are decreasing. 
To decide arbitrarily that one media 
is more profitable than another in the 
terms of "cost-per-sale" is practically 
an impossibility. At what cost point 
can we say that radio is better than 
TV (or vice versa)? 

The big problem that's still with us 
is, of course, "where does the small ad- 
vertiser fit into the national TV pic- 
ture?" You might say they fit in those 
programs that are sold on a participat- 
ing basis or alternate week basis. But 
the small advertiser needs constant 
product identification more so than the 
big national accounts that have imme- 
diate acceptance. The local or small 
budget advertiser in many cases is giv- 
en a rough shuffle — and this will con- 
tinue so long as the dollar sign is the 
guide to media buying and programing. 
Don Blauhut 
Radio-TV Director 
Emit Mogul Company 
New York 




Mr. Blauhut 



fySY PICKINS 
IN THE 
COTTON FIELD! 




• Yes . . . "pickins" can be easy 
and profitable in New Or- 
leans, if you select WDSU for 
the job. Recently, a large de- 
partment store* tested their 
advertising of a cotton piece 
goods sale. In the test, they 
used an equal expenditure 
for: radio spots on WDSU; 
and advertising in a com- 
peting medium. 

• Advertising Research Bureau, 
Inc. conducted an impartial 
survey among customers who 
swarmed into the store. Re- 
sults showed that 37.8% had 
heard the sale news on 
WDSU! Only 19.3% had seen 
the advertising in the other 
medium. 

• In total dollars spent, WDSU's 
radio customers accounted for 
40% of the sales, while the 
other medium's customers ac- 
counted for only 18.8% of 
the sales. 

• Dollar for dollar, WDSU 
proved a far more profitable 
medium in both attracting cus- 
tomers ond influencing them 
to buy. In whatever "field" 
your sales problem lies, 
WDSU can deliver effective 
and profitable results in the 
"Billion Dollar New Orleans 
Market"! 

♦(Name ond details on request) 



T-* 



*mm 




• Write, Wire, 
or Phone Your 
JOHN BLAIR Man! 



14 JULY 1952 



205 



Research 



Q. Does the "rating muddle" still 
exist in radio and TV research? 

A. Yes it does, and the situation isn't 
getting any better. Networks and sta- 
tions still have "favorite" rating ser- 



vices, usuallv the one which shows 
them consistently in the best possible 
light. Agencies, trying to find an im- 
partial middle path, and because cer- 
tain national rating services (see chart 
below) do not provide local rating 
figures, usuallv subscribe to several. 
Clients, too. try bravely to plow 



through the reports of several services. 
When they conflict, as thev often do, 
the "rating muddle" begins. 

No single rating and audience mea- 
surement service is "perfect." Thev 
all have strong points — speed, socio- 
economic samples, audience composi- 
tions, etc. — which another service may 



Four basic radio and TV research techniques and their weaknesses (fall 1952) 



TECHNIQUE 



1. Meter 



C. Nielsen, Chicago 
and New York 



SERVICE 



National radio ratings; na- 
tional TV ratings — both pro- 
jec table to total radio/TV 
homes in U.S. Loeal radio 
and TV ratings in some key 
areas. 



AUDIENCE, RATINGS DATA 



Share, average, total audi- 
ence; "Nielsen Rating" (mea- 
sures audience for six min- 
utes or more of program) ; 
cumulative, minute-by-minute, 
flow of audience ; other ana- 
lytical data 



SAMPLE 



Fixed; electronic meters 
on about 1,500 radio. 
580 TV sets (TV sam- 
ple now being enlarged 
in proportion to growth 
of TV) ; samples select- 
ed according to socio- 
economic relation to rest 
of U.S. 



WEAKNESSES 



Lack of speed ; high 
cost; measures whole- 
family listening, rather 
than individual members 
of family ; no audience 
compositions 



2. Phone 
coincidental 

(a) C. E. Hooper, New 
York 



(b) Trendex, New York 



(c) Robert S. Conlan, 
Kansas City 



Radio audience for 100 
cities; TV audience for 40 
cities; radio-television com- 
parisons for 64 cities 



National radio audience rat- 
ings based on 20 cities in 
which TV penetration equal 
to TV penetration national- 
ly; TV ratings in 20 of 
largest interconnected cities 



Radio and TV audience rat- 
ings in any area upon re- 
quest 



Share of audience; average 
audience; audience composi- 
tion 



Average audience; share of 
audience; audience composi- 
tion; sponsor identification 



Share of audience; average 
audience 



In radio, random; at 
least 480 phone calls per 
city during evening half- 
hour; 600 for daytime 
15-min. show. In TV, 
fixed home base; at least 
f:00 phone calls per city 



In radio, random, with 
at least 1,000 homes in 
each city phoned. In TV 
home base. 500 homei 
phoned 



Random sample 



Does not sample before 
8:00 a.m. or after 11:00 
p.m. ; restricted to phone 
owners ; does not reach 
rural listenership; does 
not reach all listening 
within home or out of 
home. (Hooper give.- 
ratings as early as 6:00 
a.m. on a "computed co- 
incidental" basis) 



3. Diary 



(a) Videodex, Chicago, 

New York 



(b) American Research 
Rureau, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 



(c) Tele-Que, 

I^os Angeles 



4. Aided recall 
interview 

The Pulse, New York 



Quantitative and qualitative 
TV audience ratings repre- 
sentative of all TV areas (63 
cities included in surveys) 



Radio ratings for Washing- 
ton, D. C. ; TV ratings repre- 
sentativeof all TV areas and 
for six indivi'"- . cities 



Television audience rating* 
in Los Angeles 



Total audience; audience 
composition; qualitative reac- 
tions to programs and com- 
mercials; description of so- 
cio-economic characteristics of 
each home 



Total TV audience; TV audi 
ence composition; TV rating! 



Total audience 
composition 



audienct 



Tabulation of 9.201 
homes. rotated foui 
times a year; diaries 
kept for one week of 
each month 



Random; new sample 
group each month : 
diaries kept one week 
each month 



Random; new sample 
group each m o n t h 
diaries kept one week 
each month 



Measurement restricted 
to seven days' listening 
or viewing, per month; 
presence of diary claimed 
to affect listening habits; 
h.u man falterings of 
memory when recording; 
returned diaries are not 
always representative of 
U.S. as a whole 



Radio audience ratings in 
73 markets coast to coast; 
radio/TV comparisons in 39 
markets 



Total audience; share of au- 
dience ; audience composition ; 
OUt-of-home radio data 



Mollified area; persona! 
interviews in which re- 
spondent is asked to re- 
call his listening during 
a span of four or five 
hours with aid of pro- 
gram roster 



H u m a n faltering of 
memory; claimed tenden- 
cy of respondent to ex- 
aggerate listening accord- 
ing to how question is 
asked; fails to reach lis- 
teners in rural areas 



206 



SPONSOR 



WOK I II W \lll\<. I OK 



Standard S 1952 Study of Station Audiences is on the way. Tabulations 
are now in progress. Millions of punched cards and thousands of hours of tabu- 
lating machine time are necessary to produce reports for every station in the country. 

Agencies and Advertisers can obtain the reports on our subscrib- 
ers — either from us or from them — for the asking. The Study was done by broad- 
casters for the time buyer. 

IOII CCfll expect the same sort of complete and reliable information thai 
you received from BMB. Figures on every station (AM, FM and TV). Figures for 
every county (some of the counties split for your convenience). Figures for each 
of about 1700 separately reported cities. This detail produces the flexibility you need, 
for making your coverage patterns and relating them to distribution requirements. 

All tfOU need do is to ask stations to provide you ivith their reports. The 
data for non-subscribing stations will not be available to agencies or advertisers until 
the stations have subscribed. 

Although this is our first nation-wide coverage Study, it is the third one 
that has been conducted in keeping ivith specifications established by the industry 
for coverage measurements. This comparability — going back to 1946 — definitely 
makes our reports 



woitsii w \i i ix, ioki 



STANDARD audit and measurement services, inc. 



89 BROAD STREET • NEW YORK 4, N. Y. 
WHITEHALL 3-8390 



14 JULY 1952 



207 



lack by its very nature. 

For instance. Nielsen gives radio and 
TV ratings which are based on a sam- 
ple and method that insures them of 
being "representative" of U.S. listen- 
ing and viewing habits; but, the Niel- 
sen firm only gives local ratings in 
a few areas. Hooper, on the other 
hand, gives local ratings; but his ran- 
dom phone sample is not "representa- 
tive"' of either the locality or the U.S. 
as a whole. Pulse is more "represen- 
tative" than Hooper, less so than Niel- 
sen; but Pulse gives audience compo- 
sition figures where Nielsen does not. 
Diary methods, like ARB. furnish 
Nielsen-like data, including audience 
compositions, and go beyond Hooper 
and Pulse in this respect; but they do 
not furnish the minute-by-minute data 
that Nielsen provides. And so on. and 
on. 

It's interesting to note that the Ad- 
vertising Research Foundation, impar- 
tial offshoot of the ANA and the 4-A's, 
has put the whole question of ratings 



and radio-TV research high on the 
agenda as a serious problem to investi- 
gate. The ARF findings and recom- 
mendations may help to clear up this 
classic "muddle." 

Radio station owners, and radio net- 
works to some extent, have been voic- 
ing their own complaints about the 
"rating muddle." Most of them feel 
that the confusion does nothing to fur- 
ther radio's prestige, and that the con- 
flicting ratings make all radio research 
and radio values look dubious. 

What Victor A. Sholis, v.p. and di- 
rector of Louisville's WHAS, told a 
group of CBS affiliate executives just 
a few weeks ago is typical. Said 
Sholis: 

"While we hold the line on the rate 
card, let's make the effort and invest- 
ment to find out — for the first time — 
the true value of radio as an adver- 
tising medium. Its true value in terms 
of impact and results. Its true value 
today in relation to other advertising 
media. 



"It s ironic and tragic that after 30 
years we still don't really know what 
radio is worth. And, remember, we're 
the advertising medium that has been 
researched to the hilt. We've misused 
the research we've had, and have yet 
to get the research we need." 



Q. Which research firms give 
qualitative information (the"why's 
and wherefores") about radio and 
TV, and what does their service 
consist of? 

A. The following quartet of research 
firms are specialists in qualitative ra- 
dio and TV research. Here's an out- 
line of who they are, and what they 
do: 

1. Advertest Research, 133 Albany 
Street, New Brunswiek, N. J. 

(a) Monthly reports are issued, 
titled "The Television Audience To- 
day." These cover a wide range of 
topics, from the effects of length of set 
ownership on TV viewing to the effec- 



pilimilll!!lilll!ill!llll!!lllll!lllllll!!!ll!!lll!llimillllll!llll!!!lllllll!!llll!l!lll 

IN 

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1 CALIFORNIA 

THE 

| BIG TEN 

IS 

J COVERED 

BY 



Pulse Inc. May through October 1951 



& G3$8S> 






Shows K Y A Leading All 
8 Bay Area Independents 



' $.** *%. 



o 



.■■■: 









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NITE and DAY 



A 



30 



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HAG/TRCm'ToM PAN y 






IT'S 
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jar? Juort 



* PwAflMjjIr 



( SAN SiENfTO s 



Represented Nationally by Geo. P. Hollingbery Co. 



Um° j 



208 



The 
BIG TEN 

2,711 ,374 
PEOPLE 
"PLUS" 

1950 U.S. Bureau of Census 
Estimated Population 

( 1 ) San Francisco 
Co. . 760,381 

(2) Alameda Co. 734,74( 

(3) San Mateo 
Co. . 234,03 

(4) Santa Clara 
Co. _ 288,85 

(5) Santa Cruz 
Co. 65,92C 

(6) Contra Costa 
Co. . 297,400 

(7) Solano Co. 102,174 

(8) Napa Co. 40,451 

(9) Sonoma Co. 102,685 

(10) Marin Co. 84,735 

IN KYA'S PRIMARY 
COVERACE 



SPONSOR 






tiveness of alternate-week TV program- 
ing. The interviews are done among 
a fixed, socio-economic panel of some 
750 families in the New York Metro- 
politan area. 

(b) Special qualitative and quanti- 
tative studies of TV programing, re- 
membrance of commercials and the 
like are done to order, as are special 
radio and market research studies. In- 
terviews can be adjusted to give results 
which are roughly representative of 
the U.S. in miniature, despite being 
confined to the New York area. 

2. Advertising Research Bureau, 
Inc., 705 Central Bldg., Seattle. Wash. 

(a) Irregular, by-arrangement stud- 
ies of spot radio to compare the sales 
effectiveness of radio, newspaper, and 
other advertising at the retail level. 
How it works: a retail store spends the 
same amount in radio and other media 
to push the same product. Then. ARBI 
interviewers in stores find out which 
medium brought in how many custo- 
mers, and what they bought. Results 
of a series of ARBI studies covering 
use of radio by Sears, Roebuck are 
covered in the Spot Radio section of 
this issue. 

3. Schwerin Research Corp., 2 West 
46th St. .N.Y.C. 

(a) Audience tests of radio and TV 
programs and commercials on a spe- 
cial "captive audience" in a small New 
York theater. Results show a minute- 
by-minute line of "like" and "dislike", 
and later analysis and post-session 
question periods go far in revealing 
why the audience reacted as it did. 
This data can be related, incidentallv. 
to Nielsen minute-by-minute rating 
profiles, to determine ( 1 ) whether a 
program is holding its audience, and 
(2) if not, why the audience is lost. 

(b) Separate tests of sponsor iden- 
tification, product acceptance, socio- 
economic composition of the audience 
for a program, and related marketing 
problems. 

(c) Tests similar to (a) to deter- 
mine, in advance, the audience reac- 
tion to audition platters of radio pro- 
grams, or to TV "pilot" films or kine- 
scopes. 

4. Daniel Starch & Staff, 420 Lex- 
ington Avenue, N.Y.; 101 E. Ontario, 
Chi. 

(a) Regular reports, usually month- 
ly, on TV commercials, showing audi- 
ence reaction, brand acceptance and 
other factors. 



(b) Special pre-TV analyses of pro- 
jected TV commercials, by using art- 
work storyboards, and copy. 



Q. What are the main trends to- 
day in radio and TV research? 

A. Here is what sponsor learned in 
a series of interviews with executives 
of the leading independent research 
firms and radio-TV networks: 

1. Radio — With radio advertisers 
being cautious in their spending today, 
because of the inroads of TV and gen- 
eral hikes in media costs, radio has 



entered an era of "specialized" re- 
search on both its audience and its 
dollar results. 

Typical of such research is the mea- 
surement of auto radio listening, 
largest single-out-of-home Eactor, b\ 
Hooper, and by Pulse for the Broad- 
cast Advertising Bureau. Pulse, too. 
has expanded its out-of-home ratings 
because both stations and clients are 
clamoring for more data in this field. 

Radio's results are being measured 
increasingly. The ARBI studies are 
growing in scope and acceptance, and 
are setting a formula that will be fob 




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"Kansas Radio Audience 1951 



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■THE MAGIC CIRCLE' 

■•p Copper Publication.. Inc. ■ BEN IUDY Ge-n Mjt • WIIW • tcCHH 




.^JJ 



14 JULY 1952 



209 



lowed in many areas of the countr) to 
determine radio's pull against other 
media, and in checking radio's actual 
sales power. The American Research 
Bureau, for ABC and in some upcom- 
ing studies of its own. is checking on 
""presence of product" in matched sam- 
ples of listeners and non-listeners, to 
show how effective is the sales power 
of network programs. 

2. Television — Like radio, the trend 
is toward more research in TV as well. 
Agencies and clients want more fre- 
quent reports on TV. larger and better 
samples. With more stations due on 
the air in the coming months, admen 
feel that accurate data will he needed 
to show what effect the new stations 
are having on the audiences of the 
older outlets. 

sponsor learned that one advertiser, 
for instance, has commissioned a re- 
search study to discover the percent- 
age of the TV audience that is "audio- 
only." That's right, "audio-only. " It 
seems that this advertiser has learned 
that TV viewers, particularl) when 
they have had their set for a while, 
often have a tendency to turn it on. 
like a radio, and listen to it while 



doing something else, occasionally 
glancing at the picture tube. At the 
same time, there are people whose at- 
tention wanders during commercials, 
and who miss main points that are 

presented on a purely visual basis. 

< 

Q. Is there likely to be a "cover- 
age muddle" as well? 

A. Just as there are confusing rating 
services, the radio-TV industry is cur- 
rently having its '"circulation" charted 
by two different companies — Nielsen 
Coverage Service ( more or less spon- 
sored by NBC ) and Standard Audi- 
ence Measurement (under the aegis of 
CBS, more or less). 

Briefly, the Nielsen Coverage Ser- 
vice will provide radio and TV cover- 
age data for stations and networks on 
a national basis and on a market-by- 
market basis, adding to it other socio- 
economic and listening/viewing fac- 
tors. Source for the data will be the 
Nielsen Audimeters and personal in- 
terviews. 

The Standard Audience Measure- 
ment provides roughly similar data, 
but acquires it through a mail ballot, 
as did its predecessor, BMB. 



Q. Which research organizations 
give quantitive information? 

A. The following eight research firms 
are specialists in the field of quantita- 
tive audience measurement in radio 
and TV: 

1. American Research Bureau, Na- 
tional Press Bldg., Washington, D. C. 

I a I Monthly TV rating as "nation- 
al" figures, based on diary reports 
placed in cross-section of U.S. homes. 
These show audience size for each 
show, audience composition, viewers 
per set, viewing by length of set own- 
ership, radio vs. TV, and other data. 

lb l Nielsen-type radio data for the 
city of Washington. D. C, issued 
monthly. 

(c) Monthly TV "City Reports" for 
New York, Philadelphia and Chicago. 
Similar reports issued quarterly for 
Cleveland. Washington, and Baltimore. 

2. Robert S. Conlan & Associates, 
1703 Wyandotte St., Kansas City. 

(a) Special individual city reports 
by arrangement. Radio ratings col- 
lected via concentrated one-week tele- 
phone coincidental survey. 

(b) Special "Area Surveys" by ar- 
rangement. 




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5:00 to 9:00 A.M. 
Monday thru Saturday 



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General Manager 




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RADIO REPRESENTATIVES, INC. 
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MEXICO 



GIANT ECONOMY PACKAGE OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA RADIO 



STUDIOS IN AVALON 
AND HOLLYWOOD 



Z^ 



John Poole Broadcasting Company 



BUSINESS OFFICE: 6540 SUNSET BLVD., HOLLYWOOD 28, CALIF. 
REPRESENTED BY ROBERT MEEKER ASSOCIATES, INC. 



14 JULY 1952 



211 



3. C. E. Hooper, Inc., 10 E. 40th 
St., New York. 

I a I Radio Hooperatings Reports for 
about 100 cities, based on phone coin- 
cidentals, varying in frequency from 
once-a-month to once-a-year, depending 
on size and importance of area. 

(b) TV-Home Hooperatings, cover- 
ing two weeks of evening programing 
in TV each month. Published monthly 
for New York. Los Angeles, Chicago. 
Philadelphia. Boston. Detroit. 

(c) Early -morning radio ratings for 
60 markets, figured on a "computed 
coincidental" technique, covering from 
6:00 to 8:00 a.m. 

Id) Monthly, city-by-city media 
comparisons, reporting on percentages 
of radio, TV sets-in-use throughout the 
elay and night, covering some 40 ma- 
jor cities. Also, a TV network "Pock- 
et Piece" is published, for a minimum 
of 23 markets, giving a summary oi 
the ratings of sponsored network TV 
shows, by programs, in these markets. 

4. A. C. Nielsen Co., 2101 Howard 
St., Chicago; 500 Fifth Ave., N. Y. 

(a) National Radio Index and Na- 
tional Television Index, giving pro- 
gram ratings, homes using radio/TV. 



average audience, minute-by-minute 
audience, total homes, cumulative audi- 
ence, and other analytical data. Based 
on Audimeter records in some 1.500 
homes for radio, about 580 for TV. 

lb) Similar monthly regional and 
local reports, covering Pacific Coast 
I radio) New York City (radio and 
TV). Chicago, Los Angeles, Cincinnati. 
Pittsburgh (radio). 

(c) Program-Market Ratings, which 
show the extent to which listeners to a 
particular radio or TV program use a 
commodity, as related to the general 
level of use. 

(d) Nielsen Coverage Service, which 
will show (starting in August) daily, 
weekly, and monthly coverage data of 
radio and TV stations and networks. 

5. The Pulse, Inc., 15 West 46th St., 
New York. 

(a) Monthly radio reports for the 
New York market (ratings, etc.) based 
on aided recall interviews. 

(b) Monthly radio reports for the 
New York market (ratings, etc.) based 
on aided recall interviews. 

lb) Bimonthly radio reports for 20 
markets, annually-to-quarterly in 53 
more. 



(c) Periodic studies of out-of-home 

radio audience in major radio markets. 

(d I TV reports covering 39 markets. 

6. Tele-Que, P.O. Box 6934, Los 
Angeles, Calif.: 260 Kearny St., San 
Francisco, Calif. 

(a) Monthly TV program ratings 
for Los Angeles and San Francisco. 

(b) Occasional special surveys of 
TV commercials on a popularity basis. 

7. Trendex, 347 Madison Ave., 
N.Y.C. 

(a) Monthly radio report on 20 
cities which have a TV penetration 
equal to the national television pene- 
tration. 

(b) Monthly report of evening TV 
show ratings for network cities. 

Telephone coincidental method used. 

8. Videodex, 342 Madison Ave., 
N.Y.C. 

(a) Monthly, individual city reports 
on TV for 20 markets. 

(b) Monthly network TV reports 
for all 63 television markets. 

(c) Second part of (b) above lists 
time of all net TV programs, audience 
composition, opinion of program, opin- 
ion of commercial on "Excellent, Good, 
Fair" scale. 



$100,000,000.00 IMPERIAL VALLEY'S 



First station 
In entertainment 
Retained spdnsdrs 
Sales results 
Top programming 



PIONEER VOICE 




EL CENTR0 
CALIFORNIA 



MUTUAL — DON LEE AFFILIATE 

Represented by Paul H. Raymer Co. 

New York — Chicago — Boston — Detroit — Memphis — San Francisco— Hollywood 



212 



SPONSOR 




m 




There is no such thing as programs remaining 
static, or "by formula" at WREC. Program- 
ming is kept fresh, interesting, keyed to the 
moment . . . constantly reaching for that 
which is better. 

That the audience appreciates this is reflected 
in the fact that WREC has the highest av- 
erage Hooper rating in Memphis — and actu- 
ally costs less per person reached (10.1%) 
than in 1946. 

Alert advertisers know WREC brings them 
more in sales — more in prestige. 



MEMPHIS NO. 1 STATION 

REPRESENTED BY THE KATZ AGENCY 
AF ILIATED WITH CBS, 600 KC, 5000 WATTS 



14 JULY 1952 



213 



Theatr e and fee TV 

Q. Are theatre and fee TV related 
in any way? 

A. Only insofar as they are both com- 
peting for events, like sports, which 
have previously been televised exclu- 
sivel) via sponsored television. Presen- 
tation of sports events and motion pic- 
tures through fee TV or theatre TV 
could deprive advertisers of the use of 
these bi<> audience pullers 

Q. What progress has been made 
in building theatre TV nationally? 

A. Of the more than 23.000 theatres 
in the I .S. (including drive-ins) only 
81 were equiped with large-screen TV 
equipment at the time this issue went 
to press. RCA. which supplied about 
(>()' < of the existing installations, de- 
clined to disclose how many orders 
the\ have on band for future installa- 
tions, but an informed source puts the 
figure at about 100 orders for delivery 
before the end of the year. 

The only major competitor of RCA. 
General Precision Equipment I makers 
of Simplex projectors) have made six 
installations and have orders for about 
30 more. This outfit sells their equip- 
ment package at $15,650 in comparison 
with RCA's price of $15,800. RCA 
price is down from last years quota- 
tion of $25,500. 

Three factors are holding back ma- 
jor expansion of theatre TV: I 1 ) lack 
of cable facilities to bring the TV 
shows into theatres; (2) slim fare of- 
fered by Theatre Television Network. 



which has had less than a dozen offer- 
ings in past year: (3) high initial cost 
of equipment. 

Prize fights have been a major 
source of TV programing. The Robin- 
son-Maxim fight on 25 June went out 
to 38 theatres in 24 cities, drew 94,000 
patrons at increased prices ranging up 
to $3.60 per seat. A score more theatres 
wanted the fight but couldn't get cable 
facilities west of Omaha due to cable 
being pre-empted by commercial TV 
facilities. 

\n interesting sidelight is offered 
by Nathan L. Halpern, prexy of The- 
atre Network Television. Inc. They are 
offering a "TNT" plan to major cor- 
porations as a means of carrying closed 
circuit sales meetings, with sales force 
assembled in various theatres and ex- 
ecutives giving their pitch from a cen- 
tral point. System can also be used to 
demonstrate new products, or for in- 
structional purposes. 



Q. How soon will fee TV be in 
actual competition with advertis- 
ers? 

A. This is still anybody's guess. Zenith 
has filed for their Phonevision system 
with the FCC. has no idea when the 
Commission will get around to holding 
hearings. Opposition is expected from 
citizen committees who don't relish the 
thought of paying for TV shows and 
groups representing advertisers. The 
NCAA and possibly International Box- 
in" Club will plump for pay-as-you-go 
TV system. 

International Telemeter Corp. dem- 



onstrated their coin-in-the-box device 
in New York recently, drew interest 
from the sports world, educators, mo- 
tion picture people, advertisers. 

Strangely enough, some advertisers 
admit pay-as-you-see system is inevi- 
table, are planning ways to cash in on 
it: one manufacturer wanted to know 
if it is possible to use some sort of 
'"slug" as a premium which could be 
used on Telemeter to receive specific 
program on TV free of charge. Tele- 
meter's Palm Springs test is being 
watched by theatre owners because 
this California experiment will send 
first run movies into homes via the 
local picture house, which will get a 
cut of proceeds. 

Another angle which may appeal to 
advertisers lies in the wire recorder 
which is an integral part of the Tele- 
meter device; it was originally intend- 
ed to monitor programs paid for by 
viewer so that funds could be divided 
up among promoters supplying pro- 
grams. Now, the possibility exists that 
the recorder could be used to register 
all programs received, whether paid 
for or sponsored, thus giving a much 
wider base than now exists for rating 
purposes. 

The third entry in the fee-TV sweep- 
stakes. Skiatron Electronics & Tele- 
vision Corporation of New York, plans 
a 30-day test in New York, subject to 
FCC approval, commencing about 15 
October. Plan is to follow the pattern 
set by Zeniths Phonevision test in Chi- 
cago last year; it will use 300 families, 
depend heavily on motion pictures, 
and possiblv some sports events. 



^t hall billion dollc 



ar man 



net 



SPRINGFIELD, ILL 



Illinois' Capital City and Sangamon County — plus the seven counties that surround it — 
report total retail sales of $471,000,000, and segments of other nearby counties bring the 
total to a good half billion. BUYING INCOME is estimated at $662,000,000. Springfield 
itself shows a quality market index 37 percent above the national average. 



WTAX 



is the number one buy in this 
rich area. Its dominant position is reflected 
in Springfield Hooper reports (Feb-March 
1952) offering a larger audience than other 
Springfield stations combined. 



WTAX 



I2VO 
KC 



Tcbs-the^/address 

Represented by Weed & Company 



214 



SPONSOR 



1 ^.V.'V -W «V H ' 






Among major markets 

WASHINGTON * 



v&>i 



§g 



I 









.j&i-ti" 



k3k 

■;'v,: 



St 






1 

rj55« 

m 



m j^r family 



income 





Among radio stations 






WRC 



FIRST in WASHINGTON 





With the extraordinary per family income 
of $6,553 (Sales Management estimate), 
Washington is outranked by only four 
other markets in the United States, and 
these are not among markets normally 
classified with Washington. 

Washington alone, with its 278,500 Gov- 
ernment employees earning a monthly pay- 
roll of over one hundred million dollars, 
can offer this unique buying power. 

Washington is a STABLE market, a 
QUALITY market, a RICH market. 






5,000 Watts - 980 KC 



Represented by NBC Spot Sales 



WASHINGTON... 

Established in 1923, WRC is first in length 
of service to the nation's capital. 

An average of 25 news shows weekly 
originate to the network, in whole or in 
part, from WRC. A number of special 
events and discussion programs also are 
fed to NBC by the Washington station. 
The same careful production is applied to 
all local programming. 

WRC has the top-rated early morning 
show, Bill Herson's "Timekeeper," and 
the largest number of top-rated quarter 
hours (56 out of 112) between 7 and 11 
p.m., Sunday through Saturday (ARB, 
Feb., 1952). 

WRC is an ESTABLISHED station, a 
LISTENED-TO station, a SELLING 
station. 



14 JULY 1952 



215 



Unions 



Q. Are there any upcoming devel- 
opments that would affect air ad- 
vertisers? 

A. Yes. there are some jurisdictional 

questions coining up. One, is whether 
to merge all talent union membership 
into a single card plan: the other, 
concerns the jurisdiction of the Screen 
Actors Guild over the production of 
TV film. 

At present there are five unions 
whose members participate as enter- 
tainers in TV. They are the Television 
Authority, the American Federation of 
Radio Artists, the American Guild of 
Musical Artists. Actors Equitv. Chorus 
Equity, and the American Guild of 
Variety Artists. I nder an agreement 
with the five other unions, TVA acts 
as a bargaining agent in the medium 
for all of them. 

The next move on the agenda is to 
make it possible for a performer hold- 
ing a membership in any one of these 
unions to be eligible to work in any 
other entertainment field without hav- 
ing to take out another union card. 
In other words, membership in AFRA 
would suffice for stage work, which 
comes under Actors Equit\'s jurisdic- 
tion. A poll on the one-card plan has 
been held among the members of all 
six unions and tabulation of the vote 
is due shortly. 

TVA s authority at the moment is 
limited to live or kinescoped programs, 
while the Screen Actors Guild func- 



tions as the bargaining agent in the 
production of shows filmed via the 
standard movie camera for TV. This 
demarcation of jurisdiction was de- 
manded h\ the SAG and upheld by the 
National Labor Relations Board in a 
test case regarding the Amos '»' Andy 
show. However, TVA still expects to 
contest the issue. 



Q. What is the jurisdictional sta- 
tus of TV writers? 

A. Like main another labor problem 
in TV. the question of who represents 
TV writers has been largely a make- 
shift operation that was solved slowly 
while TV grew rapidly. 

Radio writers are covered by a 
"Minimum Basic Agreement," worked 
out several seasons ago between the 
networks and the Radio Writers Guild, 
one of the craft guilds of the Authors 
League of America. Agencies and in- 
dependent producers adhere to this, 
through letters of agreement. Problems 
are few, scales are set. and there's lit- 
tle bickering between guilds of the 
ALA. 

Television has been another matter. 
Although most of the members of the 
Radio Writers Guild have doubled in- 
creasingly in TV, the RWG does not 
have official representation for them. 
As TV was growing, a running battle 
started between the RWG and the 
Screen Writers Guild and the Drama- 
tis! s Guild, each of whom thought that 
TV was in its province. There is even 
an offshoot called the Television Writ- 



ers Group. 

A temporary stop-gap has been 
found in the National Television Com- 
mittee, composed of representatives of 
the ALA and from its member guilds. 
This NTC group has been carrying out 
negotiations (pending ALA decision 
on who will represent TV writers) with 
the networks on a "Minimum Basic 
Agreement." 

Latest step forward, while these 
NTC meetings have continued, has 
been a series of meetings of the Au- 
thors League in New York to decide on 
a League-wide reorganization. This is 
primarily to decide where and how TV 
fits in. (A new Guild? Assignment to 
an existing Guild?) 

Following this decision, first major 
shake-up in the ALA in several dec- 
ades, the contract negotiations will 
probably be speeded to a conclusion 
before the start of 1953. 

Q. Inasmuch as these union ne- 
gotiations affect the costs of pro- 
graming, how long can advertisers 
count on TV salaries remaining at 
their present levels? 
A. As is common in other fields when 
it comes to labor contract bargaining, 
management in the broadcasting in- 
dustry seeks to get as long-term a con- 
trad as possible, while labor prefers 
to keep it down to a year so as to be 
free to negotiate wage boosts and 
fringe benefits as often as possible. 
However, most contracts now in effect 
are for two years. No important ne- 
gotiations are expected this fall. 



Its WAPX the ABC Affiliate in MONTGOMERY 



. . . Where 1951 Effeetive 
Buying Ineome Was Over . . . 



$165,000,000!! 



During the ten-year period from 
1939 to 1950. the Montgomery 
metropolitan area recorded the 
following increases: 

. . . And this does not include the 
tremendous PX and Commissary 
-ales at the Maxwell Field and 
Gunter Field Air Force bases. 
\\ \l'\ helps you sell this market 
with radio advertising plus the fol- 
lowing merchandising aids: 



WAPX 



Retail Sales up 256% 
Food Sales up 310% 

Mail Promotion 

Express Truck 
Itillboards 

Lighted IVlarque, 
downtown 



Furniture-Household-ltadio Sales 
up 215% 

Automotive Sales up 267% 



Promotion 

Announcements 

Screen Advertising 

Highway Signs 

Newspaper 
Display Ads 



The Progressive Station — Montgomery, Alabama 

ABC Motional Representatives: The Walker Company 



Bus Cards 

Personal 

Appearances 

Theatre Displays 



216 



SPONSOR 



1 F 




all summer long 

millions of mmm 



will listen 




Special to Broadcasters: 

Your local Zenith dealer will gladly 
help promote your station and 
programs in his newspaper ads and 
displays. Get in touch with him today. 



Onto*TM 



insist on FM in your schedule 
and get complete radio coverage 

This year FM listening is headed for new 

and greater popularity. The baseball season 

and politieal events have made America more 

radio-minded than ever. And when every 

word eounts, millions have learned to count on FM. 

Yes — millions have discovered how FM cuts 
through static and interference to give realistic 
reception even during summer storms. With the 
"summer static season" on its way, many will turn 
to FM programs exclusively. 

All this is good news for you. It means your sales 
message will reach a larger audience — and reach it 
more effectively — when you include FM. 

R2221 



r 0NITH 



ZENITH RADIO CORPORATION, Chicago 39, Illinois 
14 JULY 1952 





217 



WSYR's— 

Local Radio Sales 

UP 39%! 



For the period ending April 30, WSYR's local 
radio sales were 39% ahead of the same period in 
1951. The local advertisers who are responsible 
for this increase are the ones in the best position to 
test the effectiveness of all media in this rich mar- 
ket. They know which advertising keeps the cash 
registers ringing. National spot advertisers — take 
note! 



One Important Reason. ..In Syracuse, 
TELEVISION SUPPLEMENTS RADIO 



Doe* NOT Replace it as a Source 
of Entertainment and Information 

Syracuse is a two-TV-station city. According to Niagara Mohawk 
Power Company monthly surveys, 71% of the homes in the 
Syracuse area have TV sets. According to the calamity howlers, 
radio in Syracuse should be a dead duck. But two separate surveys 
of television homes show that radio is alive and vigorously kicking. 
(Details, including methods of sampling, free on request). Here 
are the results: 



The $wr Vev .. = ^ ===== = 



Survey 


Date 


Number of 
Homes 
Called 


Number of 
TV Homes 


TV Homes Only, 
Average Hours per Day 


Radio 


Television 


No. 1 


Oct. 51 


763 


493 


2.90 


4.50 


No. 2 


Dec. '51 


704 


493 


3.24 


4.76 


Combined 


1467 


986 


3.07 


4.52 



m 



ACUSE 



570 KC 



NBC Affiliate. WSYR-AM-FM-TV. ..the Only Complete Broadcast 
Institution in Central New York. Headley-Reed, National Representative. 



•"""iieiu. Vi mton 

Another c- 



218 



SPONSOR 



Q. Can the national advertiser 
count on the networks' negotia- 
tions to assure them of nation- 
wide agreements? 

A. Generally, yes. But there are so 
many unions involved, ranging from 
hair dressers and makeup technicians 
to writers and directors, that negotia- 
ting is conducted at both national and 
local levels. 

A rule of the thumb seems to be that 
staff employees are handled at the local 
level, and free lancers such as actors, 
directors, and writers are dealt with 
on a national level. The recent contract 
between the nets and the directors" 
union set wages for the New York sta- 
tions and gave the Radio-TV Directors 
Guild the status of "national recogni- 
tion and a national guild shop."' Thus, 
although no wage levels were set for 
the nets other owned and operated 
stations, the RTDG would be able to 
dicker for the other stations as soon 
as the National Labor Relations Board 
issued a certificate making that union 
bargaining agents for directors in 
other cities. 

It is often desirable to carry out 
negotiations on a local level. Local 
affiliates of the nets prefer the flexi- 
bility of local bargaining. Small city 
broadcasters would be resentful if pay 
scales were set nationally on the New 
York or Hollywood scale levels, always 
higher than elsewhere in the U. S. 



Contests a nd premiums 

Q. What is the fall trend in con- 
tests? 

A. The big contest users are keeping 
their fall plans under wraps but thev 



admit that the upcoming season will 
be very active. One of the reasons 
for this is that advertisers are highK 
cost-per-1,000 conscious and they see 
contests as a good means of building 
audiences for their shows as well as 
getting people to bu\ their products for 
the first time. 

Q. What is the fall trend in pre- 
miums? 

A. Its shaping up to be the biggest 
premium year in history. Self-liqui- 
dating items are well in the majority, 
as in previous years, but fewer items 
costing a dollar or more are being of- 
fered. Most popular items have ranged 
from 25<£ to 500 each. 

Cutlery, plastic houseware, and 
kitchen tools continue to pull well and 
will probably be the most offered 
premiums this fall. 

Q. What offers have been most 
successful this past season? 

A. Colgate's offer of a doll for any 
Colgate boxtop and 500 pulled more 
than a million replies: a similar offer 
for a copper hanging bowl drew almost 
as many half-dollars. 

Flamingo orange juice's offer of a 
Swing-A-Way wall can opener pulled in 
over 510.000 can tops. Although 
Flamingo halted spot TV advertising 
last November, the can tops are still 
coming in with apologetic letters. 

Minute Maid lemonade announced 
the offer of a lemonade stand for 
youngsters on the Gabby Hayes NBC- 
TV show on 11 and 18 June. By the 
25th, over 8,000 quarters and pairs 
of can tops had been received. Indi- 
cations are the offer will pull steadily 
all summer long. 



New broadcast codes 
and censorship 

Q. Is government censorship of 
radio and TV imminent? 

A. Despite the front-page publicity 
won by Rep. Gathings and his 
"hootchy-kootchy" demonstration, the 
House subcommittee which is investi- 
gating alleged bad taste in radio and 
TV programing is not expected to come 
up with recommendations for restric- 
tive legislation. 

In his testimon) before the subcom- 
mittee. Harold F. Fellows, president ol 
the NARTB said he is "supreme!) con- 
fident" that the industn can eliminate 
any offensive programs without gov- 
ernment censorship. 

Fellows' statement that the bulk of 
complaints were inspired by "minorit) 
groups having an ax to grind" was 
borne out by Rep. Arthur G. Klein, a 
committee member, who said that 
the subcommittee received "thousands 
ol complaints from the lunatic fringe 
of the radio-TV audience." 

The Washington session recessed 
until mid-August, at which time two 
other NARTB spokesmen, one rep- 
resentative of the Civil Liberties Union 
and one from NBC. will testify. 

Cornerstone of the industry's defense 
is expected to be the TV Code. Al- 
ready accepted by 90 stations and four 
networks, it is expected that by the 
time the subcommitte convenes again 
close to 100 stations will have agreed 
to abide by the provisions of the Code. 

The industry is expected to put 
across a telling point: it's just plain 
unprofitable not to produce the highest 
standards in good taste and program- 
ing. In his testimony, Fellows pointed 




14 JULY 1952 



219 




gives advertisers the 




of any major station 



at the 




Adam J. Young, Jr., Inc., National Rep. 

Guardian But 






J. E. Campeau, President 



Detroit 26 



220 



SPONSOR 



out that licensees "have a keen sense 
of awareness of the value of circu- 
lation. . . . They know full well that 
every receiving set is equipped with 
convenient means for tuning their pro- 
gram offering in . . . or out . . . and 
that under such a system of freedom of 
choice, the judgment of the people is 
the ultimate standard of acceptability." 

Then, too, the Civil Liberties Union 
may be expected to stress the fact that 
the Constitution of the U.S. guaran- 
tees certain freedoms in the field of 
communication. 

Clincher in the industry's arguments 
will probably be a spirited presenta- 
tion of the other side of the coin. TV 
has many excellent shows to its credit 
and has enough ammunition to counter 
every "bad taste"' blast against its pro- 
graming. Close adherence to the Code, 
particularly in the next month or two, 
will do much to strengthen the indus- 
try's demand that it be permitted to 
operate without government controls. 



TV and sports 



Q. How effective is sports spon- 
sorship? 

A. The scarcity of sustaining sports 
events is ample proof that sport TV 
sponsors are enthused about results 
they receive from sponsoring boxing, 
baseball, and other sports. 

A recent success was rung up by the 
Theodore Hamm Brewing Co. of St. 
Paul. Dissatisfied with distribution and 
sales in the Chicago area, the brewer 
co-sponsored with Chesterfield tele- 
casts of the home games of the Chi- 
cago White Sox and Cubs over WGN- 
TV at a cost of about $8,000 per week. 



Within the first 10 days, almost 1,500 
new retail outlets were handling the 
beer. By the end of the second month 
of telecasts, 3,000 package stores, 
groceries and taverns had been added 
to Hamm's dealer list. Result: Hamm 
has tripled sales in the area. 



Q. What's happening to sports 
attendance? 

A. Of interest is the fact that despite 
the daily TV coverage, attendance at 
the ball games referred to above is up 
over last year. 

Unfortunately, in most other major 
league cities the box office thus far is 
taking a beating. In New York, for 
example. Giants' attendance is off over 
110,000 tickets, and the Yankees' turn- 
stiles (after 33 games) have clicked 
only 588,000 times in comparison with 
875,000 at the same stage of last year's 
season. The management of the two 
teams blame the bad weather for the 
drop (it rained eight out of 10 week- 
ends), but many of TV's critics blame 
the loss of revenue on telecasts. 

Actually, the major leagues have no 
complaints about TV's effect on their 
boxoffices. but the minor leagues tell a 
different story. Most of the minors 
have discontinued daytime weekday 
games and switched to the more ex- 
pensive night games. The telecasting 
of major league games into minor 
league territory is slowly strangling the 
minors. This, of course, deeply con- 
cerns the majors because they foresee 
the drying up of their talent pool. 

In the field of football, the NCAA's 
restrictions on telecasting have made 
local sponsorship of college football 
games impossible. This has a side ef- 
fect on radio as is evidenced by the re- 



fusal of Atlantic Refining Co. to spon- 
sor broad< a-ts of the Saturday games 
because they claimed they lost their 
audience to T\ . 



Q. What developments of inter- 
est to advertisers are imminent in 
the sports picture? 

A. Because of the hefty audiences 
drawn l>\ telecasts of spoil events, 
everyone is trying to get into the act. 
Theater owners, who blame their red 
ink on TV instead of bad pictures, are 
showing a growing interest in large 
screen TV for their houses. The fee 
TVers look upon sports as their open- 
ing wedge, just as sports sparked in- 
terest in TV in its early days. Because 
of the vast potential take possible, 
sports promoters are eager to jump on 
the fee TV bandwagon. If this comes 
about, advertisers might have to make 
some changes in their radio and I \ 
programing. 



Radio and .sports 



Q. Is there a trend toward declin- 
ing sponsorship of sports on ra- 
dio? 

A. Highly publicized exit of Atlantic 
Refining from radio coverage of col- 
lege football caused some of radio's de- 
tractors to give the move more sig- 
nificance than it deserves. Far larger 
budgets than Atlantic's are being 
poured into radio coverage of sports. 
By far the biggest item in Falstaff 
Brewing's ad budget is Game-of-the- 
Day, and coverage of the Chicago Cubs 
and St. Louis Browns — on radio. Mil- 
ler Brewing Co. covers baseball, bas- 




14 JULY 1952 



221 




And works is the word which perfectly describes Eddy Jason, Wis- 
consin's best-known Radio personality. 

Been with us 12 years. Heads one of our Theatrical Units (5-piece 
Band thrown in) called Town Hall Players. He writes Plays (excellent) 
— Songs (fair) — Poetry (awful). Both Eddy and Town Hall are now 
part of Wisconsin's good living. 

Last year, in 317 personal appearances throughout our Primary, 
Eddy and his Town Hall Gang played to more than 177,000 paid 
admissions. And their recordings for Juke Boxes have become big 
favorites in 17 Counties. 

In addition to his personal appearances, Eddy handles our 5-7 AM 
slot, as well as our Homemakers' Hour . . . and a 15-minute segment 
at noon. 

Yep, we really mean it: "This Guy Works For Us" . . . and how! 



Wisconsin's most show-full station 



5000 WATTS 



IN 



Green Bay 



HAYDN R. EVANS, Gen. Mgr. 
Represented By WEED & COMPANY 



o> G R E - ., , 




A Y 



222 



SPONSOR 



ketball, hockey, and football —on ra- 
dio. Gillette and Pabst have their box- 
ing shows on TV, but make sure that 
they back it up with radio coverage of 
the same events. 

Advertisers in practically every cate- 
gory have been and continue to be 
enthusiastic sponsors of every type of 
sports event. In a small town in Penn- 
sylvania a candidate for mayor who 
bought time between rounds of a local 
fight had so many favorable comments 
that he said, "Next time I'm running 
for any public office you can bet your 
boots that I'll use my whole radio 
budget for sports events; anything 
from a boat race to a chess match."' 

Despite the fact that every major 
league ball club is covered by TV, ad- 
vertisers have plunked down their 
cash to insure broadcasts of every 
game, at home or away. With the ex- 
ception of Atlantic, no major adver- 
tiser has given up radio coverage. 

On the contrary, both new and es- 
tablished sponsors are demonstrating 
their realization that the cost of radio 
coverage of sports events is low when 
the size of the audience drawn is con- 
sidered. For example, CBS has been 
carrying the Professional Golfers As- 
sociation tournament on a sustaining 
basis for five years. This year CBS 
worked out a series of 15-minute sum- 
maries and sold the lineup to Reynolds 
Metals. General Electric, which car- 
ried three hours of college football on 
CBS-Radio every Saturday last winter, 
is expected to pick up its option for 
this year's coverage. 

John Derr, director of sports for 
CBS-Radio, reports, "We've got more 
sports on radio in 1952 than in '51. 
Actually. I look for an increase of 
sports programing as more time be- 



available." 



Mail order and P.I. 



Q. Has mail order advertising 
shown an upward trend? 

A. Despite the big success of a few 
firms recently such as Charles Antell 
and J & P nursery, volume of mail 
order advertising is down. Paradoxi- 
cally, one of the main reasons for this 
is the success of Antell. Promoters of 
mail items have seen the success of the 
above two items via 15-minute inte- 
grated shows (which some people have 
accused of being "15-minute commer- 
cials" ) . Hence many other companies 
would like to do the same type of show 
on radio or TV. But criticism has 
made stations hesitate to accept this 
business. 

Then, too, because of bad smell cre- 
ated by some items which did not live 
up to specifications, stations and nets 
have been setting up many and varied 
restrictions which make preparation of 
commercials difficult. 

According to an executive of a top 
mail-order agency : "Today, TV is 
more receptive to mail order business. 
A year ago nets would apply policies 
on TV which seemed designed to bol- 
ster their radio business. Now TV 
seems to need the dollars more and 
is becoming more reasonable in its 
demands.'' 



Q. Are stations handling more 
business on a per-inquiry basis? 

A. Definitely not. The practice of dis- 
regarding rate cards in favor of a per- 
centage or per-inquiry arrangement 



-liows indications of being on the wa\ 
cut. I lie stations accepting business 
on this basis are mainl) -mall ones 
(with notable exceptions) and their 
operating methods turn out to be in- 
efficient. The orders thej receive are 
not alwa\s large enough to o\ercome 
the cost <>! the correspondence, bicker- 
ing, and ill will the) create. 

Agencies and station reps frown on 
this type of business because many 
stations which have made P.I. a profit- 
able operation would prefer to deal 
directly with the advertiser in order 
to eliminate commissions. 

The P.I. deal appeals strongest to 
small manufacturers, distributors, and 
jobbers because it doesn't require a 
capital outlaw Instead of the usual 
straight rate card arrangement, the 
P.I. advertiser has to pay for actual 
sales results only. 



FALL ECONOMICS 

{Continued from page 41) 

clouds in sight to make anyone believe 
sales will decline after the summer. 
The 1951-'52 slump cleared the way 
for replacement of home goods with 
retail inventories declining from a high 
of $20,643,000 in May of 1951 to a 
low of $17,887,000 in March of this 
year. Then they began moving up 
again, which means orders for manu- 
facturers. However, since manufactur- 
ers' inventories increased during the 
same period, there has not been any 
direct fillip to industrial payrolls. 

Nor will there be in the fall. Goods 
will be easy to get and retailers prob- 
abl) will keep themselves stocked only 
enough to avoid running out of impor- 
tant numbers. (That is one reason 




14 JULY 1952 



223 



ATLANTA 



WAGA 



5000w 590kc 

CBS 

RADIO 



ONLY A COMBINATION 

"OF STATIONS CAN 

COVER GEORGIA'S 

MAJOR MARKETS 



THE 



gE TIrgia TRW 



MACON 



WMAZ 



10,000w 940kc 

CBS RADIO 



SAVANNAH 



WTOC 



5000w l 1290kc 

CBS RADIO 




represented 
individually and 
as a group by 

THE KATZ AGENCY, INC. 

NEW YORK CHICAGO DETROIT ATLANTA DALLAS KANSAS CITY 



the TRIO offers 
advertisers at 

one low cost : 

CONCENTRATED 

COVERAGE 

• 

MERCHANDISING 

ASSISTANCE 

• 

LISTENER LOYALTY 

BUILT BY LOCAL 

PROGRAMMING 

• 

DEALER LOYALTIES 

in 3 major markets 



lOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO 



why the term "normal" can be applied 
to today's economy.) 

The economy in general is healthy, 
if official indicators are any guide. In 
terms of dollars, the gross national 
product has been rising and during the 
first quarter of this year was running 
at the annual rate of $339.7 billion, an 
increase of $20 billion over the previ- 
ous first quarter. 

All of this is not consumer goods. 
A huge chunk of the gross national 
product figure is armaments. As far as 
personal consumption expenditures go, 
in terms of dollars they have increased 
from $208.8 billion (the annual rate) 
during the first quarter of 1951 to 
$209.6 during the corresponding quar- 
ter of this year. During the same pe- 
riod, the price index (for moderate in- 
come families in large cities) rose 
from 184.5 to 188.0. indicating there 
was a small decline in actual amount 
of goods and services purchased. 

That's only part of the story. An- 
other important indicator is the amount 
of disposable personal income, or in- 
come after taxes. This increased from 
an annual rate of $216.5 billion to 
$226.3 billion during the same periods. 
It's not a simple matter to accurately 
relate disposable personal income to 
the price index but a rough compari- 
son shows that D.P.I, increased .04V < 
■while prices increased .017%. 

However, a lot of goods were 
dumped via price-cutting during the 
first quarter of this year, (not all of 
them are reflected in the price index) 
and the fall picture presents the possi- 
bility of upward price pressures. These 
pressures will be concentrated among 
those items which declined drastically 
during the recent "recession." 

The difference between personal con- 



sumption expenditures I what is spent 
by consumers ) and disposable personal 
income (what is received by consum- 
ers) is known as personal net saving. 
There has been a lot of talk, a lot of 
it loose, among businessmen about the 
high rate of personal saving and how 
it is the job of business to unclench 
the tight fist of the consumer. 

In the first place, it is pointed out 
by economists, personal net saving does 
not refer solely to stocks, bonds, and 
money in the bank. It also takes in for 
example, premiums paid on life insur- 
ance policies, payments made on ap- 
pliances and autos, and mortgage pay- 
ments. In the case of life insurance 
policies, the cash value becomes im- 
portant only when the policy matures 
or when a family, in dire need of 
money, turns to cashing in the policy 
as a last resort. Payments made on 
appliances do, to a certain extent, re- 
lease borrowing potential to the extent 
of the payments, but that is still not 
money in the bank. And mortgage pay- 
ments, while they tend to increase the 
home owner's equity are not liquid as- 
sets until the house is sold or refi- 
nanced. 

In the second place, mass demand 
comes out of current consumer income 
since the richest 20% of the nation's 
families do 93% of the saving. 

In the third place, economists have 
discovered that there is a group of 
habitual savers. 

The personal net saving figure is im- 
portant to the extent that it indicates 
a cushion for the economy. It is also 
important that the percent of saving 
during 1951 was higher than at any 
time since 1944, when it was an astro- 
nomical 24.1%. The percentage figure 
for the first quarter of 1952 was 7. 1' < . 



a drop of 1.0' r from the preceding 
quarter. This shows that the consumer 
is already dipping into his reserve. 

Some of the other indicators lay 
bare the importance of the govern- 
ment's power in affecting the nation's 
economic health. Spending for arms 
i- an obvious example. A stead] 
stream of armament orders, in turn, 
affects capital investment in new plants. 

Government spending for arms will 
reach a high point in the current 
i 1952-53) fiscal year and then is ex- 
pected to decline. It is pointed out, 
however, that some of this government 
spending is in the nature of payments 
to manufacturers for current produc- 
tion or past production. This means 
that the miners who dug the coal, the 
craftsmen who made the machine tools 
and the industrial workers who assem- 
bled some of the planes have already 
been paid. Now the manufacturer, 
who previously borrowed money to 
pay his employees, is getting a check 
from the government for deliveries. 

Over-all capital investment in new 
plants and machinery, an important 
underpinning for the economy, will be 
high this fall. • 

One of the big questions worrying 
economists is what will happen when 
government arms orders decrease. Will 
business, government and labor man- 
age to put into the consumers' hands 
enough money to buy the huge amount 
of goods which will be produced with 
all these new machines and factories? 
Part of this answer depends on the 
international situation, part depends on 
government tax and spending policies 
and. last but not least, part depends 
on the ability of American business to 
sell goods. -k * * 




14 JULY 1952 



225 



FORD MOTOR COMPANY • COLGATE PAIMOLIVE PEET COMPANY • THE BORDEN COMPANY • ARMOUR AND COMPANY • NAILED 
INC. • PHILIP MORRIS & COMPANY • LUCKY LAGER BREWING COMPANY • CARNATION COMPANY • CHARLES ANTELL • ALASK 
AIRLINES • AVOSET COMPANY • WHITEHALL PHARMACAL COMPANY • A. SCHILLING & COMPANY • MONARCH WINE COMPAN 
•INTERNATIONAL MILK PROCESSORS -WILDROOT COMPANY, INC^ALASKA STEAMSHIP COMPANY -GENERAL* FOODS CORPORATIO 

• DURKEE FAMOUS FOODS • COCA COLA COMPANY * PAN AMERICAN WORLD AIRWAYS • PEPSI-COLA COMPANY • BULOVA WATQ 
COMPANY, INC. • LEVER BROTHERS • UNION OIL COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA • SUPERIOR BISCUIT COMPANY • BREWIN 
CORPORATION OF AMERICA • BLATZ BREWING COMPANY • AMERICAN TOBACCO COMPANY • MILWAUKEE RAILROAD • ANHEUS] 
BUSCH • FOLGERS COFFEE • THE BEST FOODS, INC. * OLYMPIA BREWING COMPANY • DR. ROSS DOG FOOD * THE PROCTER 
GAMBLE COMPANY • BLOCK DRUG COMPANY • MILLERS BREWING COMPANY • STANDARD OIL OF CALIFORNIA • SCHENLE 
INTERNATIONAL CORP. • BROWN AND WILLIAMSON TOBACCO CORP. • CARTER PRODUCTS, INC. • FISHER FLOURING MILLS 
R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY • PILLSBURY MILLS, INC • PABST SALES COMPANY • NORTHWEST AIRLINES • LINCOU 
MERCURY • LIBBY, McNEIL AND LIBBY • HILLS BROTHERS * ALBERS MILLINGS CO. • GENERAL MOTORS CORPORATIO! 
FORD MOTOR COMPANY • COLGATE PALMOLIVE PEET COMPANY • THE BORDEN COMPANY • ARMOUR AND COMPANY • NALLEY 
INC • PHILIP MORRIS & COMPANY • LUCKY LAGER BREWING COMPANY • CARNATION COMPANY • CHARLES ANTELL • ALASK 
AIRLINES • AVOSET COMPANY • WHITEHALL PHARMACAL COMPANY • A. SCHILLING & COMPANY • MONARCH WINE COMPA 
•INTERNATIONAL MILK PROCESSORS'WILDROOT COMPANY, INC'ALASKA STEAMSHIP COMPANY»GENERAL FOODS CORPORATIO 

• DURKEE FAMOUS FOODS • COCA COLA COMPANY • PAN AMERICAN WORLD AIRWAYS • PEPSI-COLA COMPANY • BULOVA WATC 
COMPANY, INC • LEVER BROTHERS • UNION OIL COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA • SUPERIOR BISCUIT COMPANY • BREWIN 
CORPORATION OF AMERICA - BLATZ BREWING COMPANY • AMERICAN TOBACCO COMPANY • MILWAUKEE RAILROAD • ANHEUSI 
BUSCH • FOLGERS COFFEE • THE BEST FOODS, INC • OLYMPIA BREWING COMPANY • DR. ROSS DOG FOOD • THE PROCTER 
GAMBLE COMPANY • BLOCK DRUG COMPANY • MILLERS BREWING COMPANY • STANDARD OIL OF CALIFORNIA • SCHENLEY 
INTERNATIONAL CORP. • BROWN AND WILLIAMSON TOBACCO CORP. • CARTER PRODUCTS, INC. • FISHER FLOURING MILLS 
R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY • PILLSBURY MILLS, INC • PABSTSALES COMPANY • NORTHWEST AIRLINES • LINCOU 
MERCURY • LIBBY, McNEIL AND LIBBY • HILLS BROTHERS • 1 fc|^^^GENERAL MOTORS CORPORATI 
FORD MOTOR COMPANY • COLGATE PALMOLIVE PEET COMPANY • THM fcjj^MPANY* NALLE 1 
INC • PHILIP MORRIS & COMPANY • LUCKY LAGER BREWING COtMj^E, Wfett t ALA * 
AIRLINES • AVOSET COMPANY • WHITEHALL PHARMACAL compa 0IM| HIWWl EPWV° MPA 
•INTERNATIONAL MILK PROCESSORS-WiLDROOT COMPANY, INC»J|£ MM I^RNF 0RATI< 

• DURKEE FAMOUS FOODS • COCA COLA COMPANY • PAN AMERICAN^MB IvA WAT 
COMPANY, INC. • LEVER BROTHERS • UNION OIL COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA^SUPF^MI W BREWIN 
CORPORATION OF AMERICA • BLATZ BREWING COMPANY • AMERICAN TOBACCO COMPANY • MILWAUKEERAILrW* ANHEUSE 
BUSCH • FOLGERS COFFEE • THE BEST FOODS, INC • OLYMPIA BREWING COMPANY • DR. ROSS DOG FOOD • THE PROCTER 
GAMBLE COMPANY • BLOCK DRUG COMPANY • MILLERS BREWING COMPANY • STANDARD OIL OF CALIFORNIA • SCHENLE 
INTERNATIONAL CORP. • BROWN AND WILLIAMSON TOBACCO CORP. • CARTER PRODUCTS, INC • FISHER FLOURING MILLS 



A CBS affiliate 

ALASKA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

KFOD, Anchorage • KFRB, Fairbanks • KIBH, Seward • KINY. Juneau • KTKN, Ketchikan • KIFW, Sitka 



New York — Chicago 

ALASKA RADIO SALES 

17 E. 42 St., New York 11, N. Y. 



Los Angeles 

DUNCAN A. SCOTT & CO. 

2978 Wihhire Bd„ Los Angeles, Cal. 



San Francisco 

DUNCAN A. SCOTT & CO. 

Mills Bldg,, San Francisco 4, Cal. 



Seattle 

ALASKA BROADCASTING CO. 

830 Securities Bldg., Seattle, Wash. 



I 



I 




Gold ($18 billion) rush of 1952 



U. S. exporters will divide an $18 billion pie this year. 

It will be a chunky $3 billion over 1951. 

To get their share smart advertisers are placing $60 million in 
time and space at home, another $240 million through local dis- 
tributors 1 — in all, a mere 1.66% of the $18 billion total. 

In contrast, American business as a whole shelled out $6.5 billion 2 
— or 4.3% — in advertising (time, talent, and production) to harvest 
the $151.2 billion 3 Americans spent on consumer goods last year. 
Of this. $2.2 billion went for newspapers, $690 million for radio, 
$562 million for magazines, $484 million for TV. 

How much of the export money is spent on radio is anybody's 
guess, sponsor's guess, based on expert opinion, is about 10% or 
$30 million, despite the fact that radio is by far the most effective 
means of communication in countries burdened with poor roads and 
high illiteracy. 

What are the facts on the 50 countries permitting commercial ad- 
vertising by air? Where are the 99 million sets outside the U.S.? 



1 Export Advertising Assn. estimate - Amer. Assn. of Adv. Agencies and 
Printers' Ink estimates 3 Sales Management estimate 



(Continued on jollowing page) 



World map of commercial • >•> O 
radio-TV countries jmrsmrwi 



International market ♦ •/» * 



International radio 



International TV 



2.11 



Newspaper comparison -•••#♦ 

• P */ ' > 

Sponsors and agencies ♦•#-» 



2:t:i 



U. V reps for stations e p . » • » 

abroad -»•/•# 




14 JULY 1952 



227 



What is the market outlook in each country? What com- 
petition do newspapers offer? What's the TV picture? 
These questions, and many more, are answered in the 
1,400 statistics listed in the accompanying charts. 

The radio situation abroad is good. You can now reach 
most of the free world over the 1,641 stations in the 50 
countries indicated on sponsor's international commercial 
radio map. Even if the country has no commercial radio, 
you can get your message to its people over such inter- 
national powerhouses as Radio Luxembourg, Radio 
Monte Carlo, Radio Internationale (Tangier), Radio 
Lourenco Marques in Mozambique. Radio Goa in Portu- 
guese India, and Radio Ceylon, which is strong enough 
to sell Wheaties to the Japanese emperor. 

We've left out a few commercial-radio countries for 
lack of information but will get them next time. Among 
them: Andorra (which broadcasts in French and Spanish 
to France and Spain ) , the Belgian Congo, British Kenya, 
Formosa (Voice of Free China), and Iran, where com- 
mercials are limited sharply. Biggest omission: the 
U.S.S.R. because the market is frozen. The Soviet Union 
has permitted daily commercials over many of its 100- 
some stations since 1947. Of 13 million receivers, nine 
million are wired so Ivan's got to listen to his master's 
voice. 

Want to "cover" the globe with an hour's program? 
One main station in each country would cost you a mere 
$5,993.65 As for commercials, you can buy three words 
on Radio Cultura de Aracatuba, Sao Paulo, Brazil, for 
only lO 1 /^- Among the cheapest: Radio Commercial, 
Ecuador, 6(* for 15 seconds. 

Here are 10 tips to the foreign-radio sponsor 

1. Don't wait too long to try foreign radio. The "big 
rush" to use the air is for three reasons: (a) improved 
quality of programing; (b) press limitations (illiteracy, 
urban circulation) ; (c) disproportionate rise in press 
rates because of newsprint-price advances. 

2. Work with station reps, local distributors and local 
ad agencies to get the best programs. Use programs in 
preference to announcements wherever possible. Too 
much triple and quadruple-spotting. 

3. Use a reliable export agency. 

4. Cut your commercials in the U.S. for better quality, 
but watch limitations on this (Chile, Colombia, Venezuela, 
etc. ) . 

5. Know national regulations. (Colombia bars singing 
commercials. New Zealand won't let you brag. In Ire- 
land you have to an Irish firm to sell via air.) 

6. If currency regulations keep you out, consider local 
Mibsidiaries. 

7. Don't beat down rates. Result is multiple-spotting. 

8. Edit your copy locally for idioms, usage. 

9. Use variety programs. Too many soap operas. 
10. Don't ignore TV. It's booming. 

What's wrong with radio abroad? (Most common com- 
plaints heard in the trade) : 

1. Over-spotting (up to 10 solid minutes). 

2. Need for more rate standardization. 

3. Poor programs. 

4. Little merchandising. 

5. Almost no research. 

6. Too many stations in small area. 

7. Shortage of writers, performers. 
BUT — all the experts who were asked agreed: 
"Foreign radio is a very good buy!" 




You can sell via radio in the 



1 Angola 

2 Argentina 

3 Australia 

4 Bahamas 

5 Barbados 

6 Bermuda 



7 Bolivia 

8 Brazil 

9 British Guiana 
10 Canada 

1 I Ceylon 
12 Chile 



13 Colombia 

14 Costa Rica 

15 Cuba 

16 Domin. Re pi 

1 7 Ecuador 

1 8 Germany 



*** And these U. S. Territories and Possess! 



i 



228 



SPONSOR 



A 



. «fW 



. 




1. 














j countries 








« 

Greece 


25 Japan 


31 Mozambique 


37 Pen* 


44 South Africa 


Guatemala 


26 Jamaica 


32 Mexico 


38 Philippines 


45 Spain 


Haiti 


2T Liberia 


33 /Veu? Zealand 


39 Portugal 
4© For/. fw/irt 


46 Surinam 

47 Tangier 


[Honduras 


28 Luxembourg 


34 Nicaragua 


4 1 S««r 


18 Trinidad 


Hong Kong 


29 M«/ay« 


35 Panama 


42 £7 Salvador 


40 Uruguay 


Italy 


30 Monaco 


36 Paraguay 


43 Singapore 


50 Venezuela 


llaska D. Hawaii \j m Puerto Rico \) m 


Virgin Islands 






14 JULY 195 


2 






229 



1. How big is the foreign market? (commercial radio countries only) 



COUNTRY 


POPULATION 
1950' 


NATIONAL 

INCOME 

1949' 

'MILLIONS' 


PER 

CAPITA 

INCOME 

1949 1 


1951 
IMPORTS' 
iMILLIONSi 


1951 

IMPORTS 

FROM U.S." 

'MILLIONS) 


TRADE 
OUT- 
LOOK 


LANCUACE 


ILLITERACY 
PERCENT 


UNITED STATES 
(For comparison only) 


156,197,000 
( 1 Mar. est.) 


$276,000 
(1951) 


$1,707 

(non-farm) 


$10,962 






Eng, 

30 others 


2.7 
(1947) 


1 Angola 


4,597,000 








$ 75.8 


$ 


9.6" 


Fair' 


Port 


90-100 


2 Argentina 


17,196,000 


$ 


5,722 


$ 346 


$ 1,083" 


$ 


233.4 


Poor 


Span 


20-39 


3 Australia 


8,186,000 


$ 


5,374 


$ 679 


$ 2,007 


$ 


176.7 


Poor 


Eng 


0-19 


4 Bahamas 


79,000 








$ I7.2 ,J 


$ 


10.3 


Fair 


Eng 


40-59 


5 Barbados 


209,000 








$ 2 1.7 ' 


$ 


1.6 


Fair 


Eng 


40-59 


6 Bermuda 


37,000 








$ 23" 


$ 


1 1.0 


Exc 


Eng 


20-39 


7 Bolivia 


3,990,000 


$ 


221 


$ 55 


$ 55.8" 


$ 


39.9 


Good 


Span 


80 


8 Brazil 


52,645,000 


$ 


5,530 


$ 112 


$ 2,012.4 


$ 


699.4 


Good 


Port 


56.7 


9 Brit. Guiana 


420,000 


S 


60 


$ 141' 


$ 32.1" 


$ 


4.5 


Poor 


Eng, Hind' 


20-39 


10 Canada 


14,009,000 


$ 


16,000' 


$1,143' 


$ 3,879 


$2,588 


Exc 


Eng, Fr. 


3 


7 7 Ceylon 


7,550,000 


$ 


487 


$ 67 


$ 327.3 


$ 


19.2 


Fair 


3 used = 


42.2 


7 2 Chile 


5,809,000 


$ 


1,070 


$ 188 


$ 329.1 


S 


165.9 


Poor 


Span 


28.2 


1 3 Colombia 


1 1,260,000 


$ 


1,456 


$ 132 


$ 364.4 


$ 


226.2 


Good 


Span 


44.2 


14 Costa Rica 


837,000 


$ 


105 


$ 125 


$ 46" 


$ 


31.6 


Good 


Span 


40-59 


IS Cuba 


5,348,000 


$ 


1,550 


$ 296 


$ 640.2 


$ 


539.7 


Exc 


Span 


22.1 


76 Oom. Republic 


2,277,000 


$ 


170 


$ 75 


$ 51.2 


% 


48.5 


Exc 


Span 


60-79 


1 7 Ecuador 


3,378,000 


$ 


134 


$ 40 


$ 55 


% 


34.8 


Good 


Span 


60-79 


78 Germany 


69,000,000' 


$ 


15,300' 


$ 320' 


$ 3,433 


$ 


519.3 


Poor 


Germ 


0-19 


79 Greece 


7,960,000 


$ 


1,008 


$ 128 


$ 428 


$ 


98 


Fair 


Greek 


40.8 (1928) 


20 Guatemala 


2,803,000 


$ 


293 


$ 77 


$ 80.8 


$ 


47.2 


Good 


Span 


65.4 


2 7 Haiti 


3,750,000 


$ 


150 


$ 40 


$ 44.5 


$ 


28.2 


Good 


Fr, Creole 


80-89 


22 Honduras 


1,534,000 


$ 


110 


$ 83 


$ 39.4 


$ 


33.8 


Fair 


Span 


66.3 


23 Hong Kong 


2,260,000 








$ 665 


$ 


103 


Poor 


Eng, Chin 


40-59 


24 Italy 


46,272,000 


$ 


10,800 


$ 235 


$ 2,1 18.7 


$ 


456.2 


Fair 


Ital 


26.1 


25 Japan 


82,900,000 


$ 


8,260 


$ 100 


$ 2,124 


$ 


596.6 


Good 


Jap 


20-39 


26 Jamaica 


1,403,000 








$ 62.7" 


s 


16.6 


Fair 


Mostly Eng 


23.9 


27 Liberia 


1,648,000 


$ 


62 


$ 38 


$ 17.3 


$ 


21.8 


Good 


Eng 


90-100 


28 Luxembourg 


297,000 


$ 


162 


$ 553 


$ 2.529 1 


$ 


376.6 1 


Good' 


3 used k 


0-19 


29 Malaya 


5,227,000 








$ 1,554 


$ 


57.8 


Fair 


4 used 1 


60-79 


30 Mexico 


25,368,000 


$ 


2,960 


$ 121 


$ 782.9 


$ 


711 


Good 


Span 


51.6 


31 Monaco 


23,000 














Good' 


Eng, Fr, etc. 


0-19 


32 Mozambique 


6,251,000 








$ 57.5" 


$ 


10.3 


Fair' 


3 used'" 


90-100 


33 New Zealand 


1,920,000 


$ 


1,610 


$ 856 


$ 442.1 


$ 


58.2 


Poor 


Eng 


0-19 


34 Nicaragua 


1,184,000 


$ 


105 


$ 89 


$ 30 


$ 


21.3 


Good 


Span 


80-89 


35 Panama 


764,000 


$ 


140 


$ 183 


$ 63.4 d 


$ 


46.6 


Good 


Span. Eng 


35.3 


36 Paraguay 


1,406,000 


$ 


109 


$ 84 


$ 27.5" 


$ 


4.3 


Poor 


Span 


80-89 


37 Peru 


8,405,000 


$ 


820 


$ 100 


$ 187.1" 


$ 


114.6 


Good 


Span 


56.6 


38 Philippines 


19,557,000 


$ 


850 


$ 44 


$ 342.4" 


$ 


350.3 


Fair 


Eng, Tagalog 


60-79 


39 Portugal 


8,490,000 


$ 


2,150 


$ 250 


$ 329.2 


$ 


39.6 


Fair 


Port 


48.7 


40 Port. India 


672,000 








$ 15.4" 


$ 


.946" 


Poor 


Eng, Port 


90-100 


4 1 Soar 


943,000 














Poor 


Germ 




42 El Salvador 


2,150,000 


$ 


197 


$ 92 


$ 63 


$ 


42 


Good 


Span 


72.8 


43 Singapore 


1,018,000 














Poor 


9 used'" 


60-79 


44 South Africa 


12,320,000 


$ 


3,200 


$ 264 


$ 1,315 


$ 


247 


Fair 


Eng, 
Afrikaans 


60-79 


45 Spain 


28,600,000 








$ 387 


$ 


1 10 


Poor 


Span 


23.2 


46 Surinam 


219,000 








$ 20.76 


$ 


8.1 


Fair 


Dutch 


40-59 


47 Tangier 


150,000 










$ 


14 


Good 


4 used' 1 


60-79 


48 Trinidad 


627,000 








$ 98.7" 


$ 


8.9 


Fair 


Eng. Hind' 


1 


49 Uruguay 


2,353,000 


$ 


779 


$ 331 


$ 335.5 


$ 


83.4 


Good 


Span 


40-59 


SO Venezuela 


4,985,000 


$ 


1,478 


$ 322 


$ 641.8 


$ 


455.7 


Exc 


Span 


56.6 


U. S. TERRITORIES 
















A Alaska 


200,000 


$ 


185 s 


$ 1,400 s 


$ 350 


$ 


300 


Exc 


Eng 


0-5 


B Hawaii 


499,794 


$ 


500 


$1,600 




$ 


340 


Exc 


5 used' 


15.1 
(1930) 


C Puerto Rico 


2,270,000 


$ 


710 


$ 313 




$ 


310 


fxc 


Span, Eng 


31.5 


D Virgin Islands 


27,000 














Fxc 


Eng 


13.4 



-•UN Statistical Office 

Department of Commerce 
h $l CO estimated from total radio 
e area Angola, South V.'est 
Belgian Congo, French Equa- 
torial Africa 

■' 

"Hind' nana, Trini- 

dad) 



H951 (Canada) 

-English, Hindi, Sinhalese used na- 
tionally, many more internationally 
'Ceylon I 

''47,607,COO in West Germany 

'Western Zone only 

1 Inc Indes Belgium 

1 ch, English, Flemish (Luxem- 
bourg I 

'English. Malay, Tamil, five Chinese 



dialects (Malaya) 

'"98% English, rest Afrikaans, sepa- 
rate transmission in Portuguese for 
Portuguese East Asia 

"1949 (Port India) 

"English, French, Dutch, Burmese, 
Thai. Kyoyu, Cantonese, Peninsular Ma- 
lay. Indoesian Malay (Singapore) 

"Portuguese Asia 

iFrench, Spanish, English, Arabic 



(Tangier) 

r Not to be considered part of for- 
eign market, but listed here for com- 
parison only 

"Alaska Broadcasting System esti- 
mates Alaska's income at $400 million; 
thus per capita income is $2,000 

"English, Japanese, Chinese, Filipino, 
Korean 



230 



SPONSOR 



2. What are the facts about radio abroad? 







NO. 








NO. SETS 








COUNTRY 


STA- 
TIONS 


OWNER- 
SHIP 


NET- 
WORKS 


SETS 


PER 
1.000 


SAMPLE NICHT RATESt 


TIPS TO ADVERTISERS All U.S. REPS 














PERSONS 






'see code page 233 i 


UNITED STATES 


2,347 


pvt 


4 


103,000,000 


664 


WCBS. New York— $1,350 






(For comparison only 












(hr) $125 H5 sec)« 






1 


Angola 


10" 


pvt 





9,000 


2 


Station CR6AA— $28 ihrl 


Claims 13 mil people in cov- 


Pas 
















$14 mo 115 sec daily) 


erage area (92,772 Europeans) ' "" 


2 


Argentina 


53 


both 


3 


1,500,000 


90 




Market shrinking steadily 


3 


Australia 


141 


both 


3 


2,010,000" 


254 


3DB. Melbourne— $149 ihrl 
$6.72 (3 mini 


Cood market for U.S. HCR IRP 
subsidiaries only 


4 


Bahamas 


1 


govt 





11,750 


150 


Station ZNS— $34 02 (hr) 


Cmrcl radio began Aug 1950 


AJY 
AJY 


5 


Barbados 


1 ■■' 


govt 





6,000 


30 


Rediffusion'— $12.60 (hrl 


Many U.S. products barred 


















due to currency curbs 




6 


Bermuda 


1 


pvt 





10,000 


270 


Station ZBM— $36 (hr) 


High per capita income 


AJY 
MG, PAB 


7 


Bolivia 


26 


both 


1 


150,000 


28 


Radio Nacional — $20 <hrl 


Can use 10° o of time for 
















$1.50 ' 50 words! 


cmrcls; most consumer 


8 


Brazil 


211 


both 


3 


2,500,000 


51 


Station PRA-— $432 (hr) 


goods imported 
Only 8% of profits exportable; \ac 
still U.S.'s 2nd biggest mkti 
















$5.40 (15 words) 


9 


Brit. Guiana 


1 


pvt 





35,000 


85 


Station ZFY— $21 (hr) 


Many US. products barred AJY 


70 


Canada 


156 


both 


3 


5,000,000 


357 


CFRB. Toronto— $180 ( l/ 2 
hr) $30 (15 sec) 


Best U.S. market, 940/ radio DC JHM W &C, AJY 
homes 


7 7 


Ceylon 


2 


govt 





42.000 


6 


Radio Ceylon — $165 <hr> 


Radio blankets 2 continents; Par 


72 


Chile 


65 


pvt 


3 


550,000 


°6 


Coop. Vitalicia — $4.47 (20 Must record ancmnts locally. m,0 PAR S$|< 
words) most consumer goods barred ' 


73 


Colombia 


85 


both 


2 


500,000 


45 


Nuevo Mundo — $120 'hr) Price controls out ICWM MG 
$3.07 ( 15 sec) dad' 


14 


Costa Rica 
Cuba 


28 


pvt 





23,000 


27 


Alma Tica, San Jose — $3 
(hr) $.18 (30 sec) 


TAD 

Better market than last yr ;AJY MG PAB 


75 


88 


both 


3 


700,000 


135 


CMQ — Net, 17 sta) — $712 Mature, competitive radio 


CWM, MG 
















''2 hrl $49 (15 sec) market; high standards 


76 


Dom. Republic 


6 


both 


1 


35,000 


15 


Hin-Hiln— $15 (hr) $.25 2,000 sets 1938; no foreign Mr PAR 
(30 sec) exchange shortage M ^' rMD 


77 


Ecuador 


35 


both 





50,000 


15 


Radio Comercial — $7.56 Imports to U.S. rose in yr CWM MG SSK 
(hr) $.06 (15 sec) 1 ' ' 


78 


Germany 


23 


govt 


5 d 


11,592,000" 


167 


Spot ancmnts only on a few 
stations; expanding market ~ 


79 


Greece 


2 


govt 




143.000 


18 


Little cmrl radio activity PAR 
Voz de Guatemala — $60 Watch coffee prices, Govt MG PAR 


20 


Guatemala 


17 


both 


e 


57,000 


5 
















(hr) $1 (15 sec) fight with United Fruit 


"-'. 


27 


Haiti 


2 


pvt 




10,000 


1 


Station 4VM— $18 (hr) No Govt curbs; business 


AJY, PAB 


22 


Honduras 


3 


pvt 


0' 


25,000 


19 


Radio Monserrat — $30 (hr) No govt curbs; road-building 


AJY. CWM MG PAB 
















$.65 (30 sec) helping country 


23 


Hong Kong 


3 


govt 





55,946" 


30 


Rediffusion'-— $20 (hr) $5 


U.S. licensing strict AJY PAB 


24 


Italy 


31 


govt 


2 


7.543,000" 


55 




U.S. imports jumped 1 /3 in yr 


25 


Japan 


139 


both 


3 


8,701,000 


106 




Booming; 16 cmrcl stations PAR 
being established 


26 


Jamaica 


1" 


govt 





25.000 


17 


Radio Jamaica — $44.10 (hr) Many U.S. products barred AJY 


27 


Liberia 


2 


both 





1,750 


1 


Station ELBC — $1 (mini jNo radio before 1951 


28 


Luxembourg 


1 


pvt 





21,000,000** 




Radio Luxembourg — $1,429 Best way to reach France, 
(hr.) $343 (15 mini' Belgium. England 


GB 


29 


Malaya 


7 


govt 


3 


44,263'' 


5 


Rediffusion'' — $20 (hr) $5 Radio Malaya serves Singapore 
(30 sec) and Malaya 


AJY 


30 


Mexico 


196 


both 


4 


1,500,000 


60 


XEX, Mexico City— $220 XEX (500,000 wattsl most 
(hr) $7 (30 sec) powerful in world 


MG, NTS, AJY, HGO 


37 


Monaco 


1 


pvt 





3,000** 




Radio Monte Carlo — $348 Claims 225 mil people in 
d/4 hr) $174 (5 min) coverage area 


PAB 


32 


Mozambique 


8" 


pvt 





600,000** 




Lourenco Marques — $80.88 Covers South Africa, Rhodesias, 
(1/2 hr) $9.70 (30 words) some Belgian Congo 


PAB 


33 


New Zealand 


28 


both 


2 


509,000" 


8,500 


Severe import curbs 




34 


Nicaragua 


22 


pvt 


1 


20,000 


17 


Radio Mundial — $16 (hr) [Minor curbs only 
$.83 (30 sec) 


CWM, MG, PAB, AJY 


35 


Panama 


26 


pvt 


2 


80,000 


105 


Radio Cont., Panama — $15 !No curbs; stations tripled 
<Vi hr) $1.30 (15 sec) since 1946 


MG, PAB, AJY 


36 


Paraguay 


6 


both 


1 


80,000 


61 


Radio La Capital — $35. 64 (hrl Dramatic programs best bet 


PAB 


37 


Peru 


20 


both 


2 


600,000 


73 


Radio America— $39 C/ 2 hr) 525,000 radios added in 1947- 
$.98 (15 sec) 50, a free market 


MG, PAB, AJY 


38 


Philippines 


6 


govt 


2 


79,000" 


4 


DZRH, Manila— $250 (hr) Imports from U.S. up to 40% 


PAB, MR 
















$25 (20 sec) 


in yr 




I 39 


Portugal 


9 


both 




212,450 


25 




Under firm Govt supervision 


PAB 


! 40 


Port. India 


1" 


govt 





350,000** 




Radio Coa — $132 (hr) $8 




PAB 


41 

1 .- 


Soar 


1 


pvt 





9,000,000" 




Radio Saarbrucken — $116 50 mil people in coverage area 
(l/ 2 hr) $43 (20 sec) 


PAB 


42 


El Salvador 


12 


both 





21,450 


10 


Radio Mil Cicuenta — $28.60 No trade curbs; market open 
(hr) $1 (15 sec) 


MG, PAB 


43 


Singapore 


7 


govt 


3 


27,093" 


53 


Rediffusion' — $32 (hr) IMost U.S. goods barred 


AJY 


44 


South Africa 


37 


govt 


3 


580,000 


48 


Springbok Network — $300 
(hr) $12 (20 sec) 


Sold out since inauguration 
1950 


PAB 


45 


Spain 


39 


both 




604,746" 


22 








46 


Surinam 


2' 


pvt 





5,000 


27 


PZH, Paramaribo— $1. 50 
(25 words) 


Business somewhat better than 
in 1951 


PAB 


47 


Tangier 


3 


pvt 









Radio International — $20 (15 Covers North Africa, Spain 
min) $3 (25 words) 


PAB 


48 


Trinidad 


2 


pvt 





12,129" 


20 


Radio Trinidad — $36.75 Many U.S. products barred 


AJY 
















(hr) $3.60 (45 sec) 


due to currency curbs 




49 


Uruguay 


45 


both 


1 


300,000 


126 


Radio Carve $67.50 (hr.) 
$.56 (20 sec) 


U.S. imports doubled in yr 


MG 


50 


Venezuela 


29 


pvt 





200,000 


43 


Radiodifusora $120 (Vi hr) U.S.'s 4th best Latin market 


MG, PAB 


! U. S. TERRITORIES 


















\a 


Alaska 


9 


pvt 


2 


106,000" 


660 


Alaska Bcstng. System' — 
$202.35 'hr) $17.25 (20 


Fastest growing market under 
U.S. flag 


ARS, JCF, DAS, SAW 


B 


Hawaii 


12 


pvt 


4' 


140,000 


285 


Station KCU— $112.50 (hr) 
$15 (30 sec) 


64,000 radio homes in 1939; 
growth — 1 18° 


(see page 233) 


C 


Puerto Rico 


25 


pvt 


1 


150,000 


66 


Station WAPA— $100 (hr) 
$9 (15 sec) k 


Had 6 stations 1939; radio 
most effective medium 


IAP, MG, ES, AJY, PAB 


D 


Virgin Islands 


2 


pvt 








Station WSTA— $2550 (hr) 
$1.05 (30 sec) 


Stations cover Leeward Is., 
eastern Puerto Rico, others 


CWM, PAB, AJY 


E 


WRUL, N. Y.i 




pvt 








$250 '. 1,2 hr) $35 (1 min) 


Estimates audience 50,000 


None 
















Europe. 125,000 Latin 




















Amc-ic» 






'Medium wave l 


nless oth 


erwise 


■"Licensei 


i receivers only 




-Class B time stations) 




noted. Some stations 


however, 


oper- 


■■Wired 


redistribution servic 


e; pri - 


•'Alaska Bcstng. System estimate: •Only privately owned, operated 




ate short and/or long 


wave 




i/ately owr 


ed in British color 


ies 


106,000 "Commercial" short-wave station in 




♦'Coverage in seve 


ral countr 


es 


d Regona 


only (West Germ 


any) 


'6 stations U.S.; broadcasts daily to Europe (5 




tCapital city stat 


ions; all 


rates 


"■Some si 


lort-wave networks 


reported 


'Stations affiliated with Continental languages), Latin America (2 lan- 




subject to frequency 


discounts 




'Smalles 


time segment s 


aid; no 


U. S networks guages) ; transmitters in Scituate, 




"Short wave 






announcem 


ents 




l C\er Puerto Rican Network (3 Mass 



3. How do newspapers compare with radio abroad?* cross section of American 

sponsors abroad grouped 
by their agencies 





COUNTRY 


NO. 
DAILIES 


TOTAL 
CIRC. 


COPIES 
PER 1,000 
PERSONS 


CIRC. TOP 
DAILY 


INCH 
RATE 


UNITED STATES 


1,773 


54,017,938 


346 


2,251,430 


$42.70 


(For comparison only) 












— 


______ 


_ _ _ 


_ _ — _ _ 




- - — - - 


- — — - 


1 


Angola 


3 










2 


Argentina 


180 


3,460,000 


209 


340,000 


$13.31 


3 


Australia 


54 


3,600,000 


455 


408,590 


$ 6.20 


4 


Bahamas 


2 


6,000 


77 


4,000 


$ .80 


5 


Barbados 


1 


13,000 


64 


9,846 


$ .60 


6 


Bermuda 


2 


12,600 


340 


8,539 


$ .80 


7 


Bolivia 


9 


56,000 


14 


26,415 


$ 1.30 


8 


Brazil 


220 


1,500,000 


30 


140,000 


$ 8.35 


9 


British Guiana 


3 


17,000 


42 


16,000 


$ 1.20 


10 


Canada 


94 


3,446,915 


245 


421,121 


$ 9.10 


1 1 


Ceylon 
Chile 


7 


200,000 


27 






12 


39 


456,000 


80 


100,000 


$ 4.00 


13 


Colombia 


37 


600,000 


55 


138,000 


$ 3.60 


14 


Costa Rica 


9 


73,500 


88 


2 1 ,000 


$ .80 


15 


Cuba 


33 


450,000 


87 


65,790 


$ 2.00 


16 


Dom. Republic 


3 


40,000 


18 


19,084 


$ 1.20 


77 


Ecuador 


25 


85,000 


25 


44,500 


$ 1.35 


78 


Germany 


162 


16,500,000 


238 


225,000 




79 


Greece 


60 


800,000 


102 






20 


Guatemala 


6 


50,000 


13 


28,000 


$ 1.25 


27 


Haiti 


6 


24,500 


6 


6,000 


$ .70 


22 


Honduras 


2 


14,500 


II 


7,800 


$ 1.00 


23 


Hong Kong 
Italy 


5 










24 


98 


4,500,000 


98 


450,000 




25 


Japan 


130 


18,423,000 


224 


1,895,228 




26 


Jamaica 


2 


65,000 


47 


54,335 


$ 2.00 


27 


Liberia 
Luxembourg 


5 




441 







28 


130,000 


29 


Malaya 


19 


151,000 


30 






30 


Mexico 


98 


1,185,000 


48 


211,850 




31 


Monaco 
Mozambique 
New Zealand 


3 

48 




365 







32 




33 


688,000 


140,000 


34 


Nicaragua 


12 


43.700 


37 


12,000 




35 


Panama 


II 


90000 


118 


25,000 




36 


Paraguay 


3 


17.000 


13 


18,000 




37 


Peru 


41 


320.000 


39 


110,000 


$ 5.00 


38 


Philippines 


20 


480.000 


25 


96,000 




39 


Portugal 


33 


500,000 


58 






40 


Port. India 

Soar 

El Salvador 


2 
9 


31 




$ 1.20 


41 




42 


67,500 


42,062 


43 


Singapore 


12 


1 12,000 


1 13 






44 


South Africa 


19 


820,000 


68 




$ 3.85 


45 


Spain 


121 


1,570,000 
10,300 


56 






46 


Surinam 


3 


55 






47 


Tangier 


2 


20,000 


133 






48 


Trinidad 


2 


48,600 


80 







49 


Uruguay 


31 


400,000 


170 


102,190 


$ 2.43 


50 


Venezuela 


29 


300,000 


65 


54,630 


$ 2.25 


U. S. TERRITORIES 












A 


Alaska 


7 


30,800 


216 


10,070 


$ 1.40 


B 


Hawaii 


4 


145,000 


317 


76,715 


$ 3.92 


C 


Puerto Rico 


5 


158,000 


73 


58,834 


$ 2.50 





Virgin Islands 


3 


2,000 


74 


2,000 


$ 0.58 



FOOTNOTE: 'Based on World Communications — Press, Radio. Film, Television (UNESCO, edited by 
Albert A. Shcat and Editor 6 Publisher International Yearbooks, 1951, 1952. 



Atherton & Currier 

Eno, Scott & Browne 
Potter Drug & Chemical 

Compton Advertising 

Campbell Soup 
Procter & Camble 

Dillon-Cousins & Assoc. 

Colgate- Pa Imolive-Peet 
Home Products International 

Footc, Cone & Belding Int. 

Armour Cr Co. 
Hallicrafters 

Foreign Advertising & Service Bureau 
Best Foods 

Gotham Advertising 

A. C. Barnes Co., Inc. (medicinals) 

The Collins Co. (agricultural tools) 

Ex-Lax 

Forhan's 

Andrew Jergens 

Jergens-Woodbury 

Maple Island (dry milk) 

Red Rock Co. of South America (beverages) 

Zonite Products 

International Advertising Agency 

Anglo American Drug 

Dr. A. W. Chase Medicine 

J. M. Mathcs 
Canada Dry Ltd. 
Canada Dry Dc Cuba 

McCann-Erickson 

Coca-Cola 

Home Products International iKolynos) 

R. J. Reynolds 

Schenlcy (Blatz beer) 

Standard Oil of New Jersey 

National Export Advertising Service 

American Safety Razor 

Borden 

Electric Auto-Lite 

Esterbrook Pen 

Coodall Fabrics 

Criffin 

Lambert Pharmacal 

Lever Bros. 

P. Lorillard 

National Carbon 

Norwich Pharmacal 

Packard Motor 

Prest-O-Lite 

Pro-phy-lac-tic Brush 

Ruppert Brewing 

Warner-Hudnut 

Westinghouse Electric 

Robert Otto & Co. 

Campbell Soup 

Humphreys Medicine 

S. C. Johnson & Sons 

Ceorge W. Luft (lipstick, powder, rouge) 

Miles Laboratories 

Miles Laboratories. Ltd., Canada 

Miles Laboratories, Pan American 

Northam Warren Corp. (nail polish, deodorant) 

Lydia E. Pinkham 



232 



SPONSOR 



F. & M. Schaefer 

Standard Brands Int. (margarine) 

U. S. Rubber Export (footwear only) 



4. What is the TV picture abroad? 





(Only countries 


permitting commercials) 




J. Walter Thompson 












COUNTRY 






station: 




Carter Products 


On 


Build- 




„ . ' Owner- 


SAMPLE NIGHT RATES 


Kraft 




Air 


ing 


Planned 


Sc ' S Sh,p 




Mentholatum 


1 Argentina 


1 


1 


4 


3,500 govt 






2 Australia 








12 


qovt 




Irvin Vladimir & Co. 


3 Bahamas 








1 




govt 




Artistic Foundations 


4 Bermuda 








1 




pvt 




Dodds Medicine 


5 Brazil 


3 


1 


4 


15,000 


pvt 




Colden State (dairy products) 


6 Canada 





2 


1 


80,000 


govt 


TORONTO STATION 


McKesson tj Robbins 














$1,600 (hr.) 


Mennen 














$240 (20 sec.) 




7 Colombia 1 ' 





1 






govt 






8 Cuba 


6 


2 


8 


70,000 


pvt 


CMQ-TV NET (5 Sta.) 


Pierce's Proprietary 

Pillsbury 

Reid Murdoch (canned foods) 


9 Dom. Republic 





1" 




1,000 


pvt 


$216 (l/ 2 hr.) 
$32.50 (20 sec.) 


Schlitz 


10 Great Britain' 


4 d 


1 




1,200,000 


govt 




7 1 Guatemala 








1 




govt 




Seagram (liquor) 
Weldon Farm Products 


72 Italy" 
7 3 Japan 


3" 
1' 



1 


4 
22 


1,500 


govt 
govt 




Wildroot 


14 Mexico 


6 


II 


20 


30,000 


pvt 


XHTV, MEXICO CITY 


Wesley Associates (formerly Dorland 
Advertising Ltd.) 


75 Peru 
1 6 Spain 



l f 


1 



2 





govt 
pvt 


$150 (hr.) $13 (I5sec.) 


Gillette (using Radio Luxembourg) 


1 7 Uruguay 





1 






govt 




Young & Rubicam 


18 Venezuela 





1 






govt 




UNITED STATES 


108 





2,000" 


17,500,000" 


pvt 


WNBT, NEW YORK 


Bristol-Myers 


(For comparison only) 












$3,750 (hr.) 


Continental Foods 














*775 (20 sec.) 


Ceneral Foods 
















Goodyear Tire & Rubber 


U. S. TERRITORIES 














Hunt Foods 


A Hawaii 








1 




pvt 




Johnson & Johnson 


B Puerto Rico 





1 


2 




pvt 




Life Savers 












Lipton 


*U. S. State Dept. estimates total sets out- 


c Expected to accept commercials in time 




side U. S. at 2.5 million by Oct. 


952. 




d l experimental 






tCoes on air in September (Monl 


c l Vatican station, 


2 experimental 


Cluett, Peabody (Sanforized division) 


rates lower). 






'Experimental 




Singer Sewing Machine 


"Undecided on commercials 






si 2 expected to be 


on air by end of year 


Time Inc. 


b Due to go on air late July or August 




h l July estimate 





5. U. S. reps for radio & TV stations abroad 



(with explanatory initials used on Chart 2) 

ARS — Alaska Radio Sales 

17 East 42nd St., New York 17 
GB — Guv Bolam 
175 Fifth Ave., New York 10 
HCB — Howard C. Brown Co. 
6059 Melrose Ave., Hollywood 38, Cal. 
CWM — Clark-Wandless-Mann. Inc. 
205 E. 42nd St., New York 17 
DC — Donald Cooke. Inc. 

551 Fifth Ave., New York 17 (also Chicago, Los 
Angeles, Cleveland, Detroit, San Francisco) 
JCF — James C. Fletcher. Jr. 
60 West 46th St., New York 36 
MG — Melchor Guzman Co.. Inc. 
45 Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20 
IAP — Inter- American Publications, Inc. 
41 East 42nd St., New York 17 
KA — Katz Agency. Inc. 

488 Madison Ave., New York 22 (also Chicago, 
Detroit, Kansas City, Atlanta, Dallas, San Fran- 
cisco, Los Angeles) 
SSK — S. S. Koppe & Co., Inc. 

630 Fifth Ave., New York 20 

JHM — Joseph Hershey McGillvra, Inc. 

366 Madison Ave., New York 17 (also Chicago, 
Los Angeles, San Francisco) 



MR — Media Representatives, Inc. 

270 Park Ave., New York 17 

HGO — Harlan G. Oakes & Associates 

672 S. Lafayette Park Place. Los Angeles, Cal. 
(also, Chicago, San Francisco, New York) 

1STS — ISational Times Sales 

17 East 42nd St., New York 17 (also Chicago, Los 

Angeles) 

PAB — Pan American Broadcasting Co. 

17 East 42nd St., New York 17 (also Chicago, Los 

Angeles) 

JBP — Joshua B. Powers, Inc. 

345 Madison Ave.. New York 17 

DAS — Duncan A. Scott 

Mills Bldg., San Francisco, Cal. 

ES — Edwin Seymour, Inc. 

270 Park Ave., New York 17 

GAW — Gilbert A. Wellington 

5546 White-Henry-Stuart Bldg., Seattle, Wash. 

AJY — Adam J. Young. Jr.. Inc. 

22 East 40th St., New York 16 (also Chicago, St. 

Louis, Los Angeles) 

W&C — Weed & Co. 

350 Madison Ave., New York 17 (also Chicago, 

Detroit. San Francisco, Boston. Hollywood, Atlanta) 



REPS FOR HAWAIIAN STATIONS 

Walter Biddick Co. 

1151 S. Broadway, Los Angeles 15, Cal. 

Derney & Co. 

535 Fifth Vve . New York 17 

Free & Peters. Inc. 

444 Madison Ave., New York 22 (also Chicago, 
Atlanta, Detroit, Ft. Worth, Hollywood, San Fran- 
cisco) 

W. C. Grant Co.. Inc. 

703 Market Street. San Francisco, Cal. (also I <>s 
Angeles, New York, Chicago) 

George P. Hollingbery Co. 

307 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 1, 111. (also New 
York, Atlanta, San Francisco, Los Angeles) 

Katz Agency 

(address above) 

Tracy Moore & Associates 

6381 Hollywood St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Western Radio Sales 

79 Post St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Adam J. Young. Jr., Inc. 

(address above) 



SPONSOR thanks — the following individual; 
and organizations for helping gather the material 
for these charts: 

Steve Mann, Tom Malone, John Carter, Adam J. 
Young, Jr., Inc.; Art Cordon, Tom Leary, Al 
Alperton, Pan American Broadcasting Co.; 
Charles Soden, Roy Smith, Alaska Radio Sales; 
Peter McCurk, Weed & Co; Guy Bolam; Al 
Martinez, Vincent Ramos, Melchor Guzman Co. ; 
S. S. Koppe & Co.; Katz Agency; Regina Marrus. 



Broadcast Advertising Bureau; Young & Rubicam; 
UN Statistical Office; Chemical Bank & Trust 
Co., N. Y. ; Export Advertising Assn.; Amer. 
Assn. of Adv. Agencies; Amer. Newspaper Pub- 
lishers Assn.; Colgate-Palmolive-Peet Co, Forgn. 
Adv. Dept. ; U. S. Dept. of Commerce, N. Y. 
Office; Consular Offices of Brazil, Liberia, New 
Zealand, Germany, South Africa, Ireland; Natl. 
Forgn. Trade Council; A. William Oliver, Jr. 
Joshua B. Powers, Inc.; Fernando Eleta, Radio 
Programas Continental, Panama; Louis Hernan- 



dez de Hita, CMQ, Havana; Edwin Seymour. 
Inc.; James C. Fletcher, Jr.; Irwin Vladimir & 
Co. The following publications were used: 
World Communications (UNESCO, Albert A 
Shea, editor); Broadcasting; Dun & Bradstreet's 
Intl. Markets; Editor & Publisher; Export Trade 
& Shipper; Facts on File; New York Herald 
Tribune; New York Times; Printers' Ink; Sales 
Management UN Statistical Yearbook; World 
Almanac. 



II August issue of SPONSOR trill contain section devoted to Canada radio and TV 



14 JULY 1952 



233 




czmna 



KRRK 

rfr&iHteU "Pte^enned Station 

• T. K. Barton, Vice-Pres. & General Manager 

• Julian F. Haas. Commercial Manager 

• National Representatives. Ed. Petry & Co. 



Ernest 


A. He 


lines 




Big Reseurcr 


Man 




Marschalk & 


Pratt 




New York C 


ity. 




Dere Ernie: 






Folk 


s down here 


iz so xcited these 








days cause we're 






fiP">Li 


t in Class AAA 




\ u» 


a;** 


baseball now 
along with Min- 
neypolis, Louise- 
ville, K. C, and 
Milwakey. Thats 
a good crowd for 






rl 


, oar ('.has. Sena- 
1 tors to be with. 








1 Hit jist goes to 
r show thet you 












can't tell a mar- 








kit by the popu- 


m * 






lation in the main 


li 


m 




city, Mm her to 


II 




look at the hole 


\1 


H 




area. Esso hez 


» 


Ix .!> 




knowed about the 






hole area, lor 








go/n' on II \eres 


^cp 






1 WCHS haz bin 


<H 




v can i in' tli Es- 
so Reporter. 
Theyres lots oj 


bizness 


.7o« » here with coal and 


chemic 


es ant 


! // C/YS ,<///, 5000 at 580 


iz the way to 


cocer 


it. 








Yrs., 








llgy. 




w 


c 


H S 


Charlc 


ston, W. Va. 



!lllilllllll!!l!l[|||||l!l!llltllll!!!l!lll!llllll!!lll 

INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

illllllllllllllll!liilllll!lllll!llllllll!!!lillllllllW 



Page 

Alaska Radio Sales _ 226 

Arktex Stations 86 

Assoi iated Press 88, 89 

Associated Program Service _ 168 

Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn 3 

Broadcast Musk. Inc. .. 163 

( aravel 1 ilms 198 

CBS Radio Network... ..51,52,53 

CBS-TV S Sales 158,159 

( 1(1. Montreal ... ...... 14 

CKLW, Detroit _ 220 

Crosley, Cincinnati Inside Back Cover 

Don Lee - 17,18 

DuMonl Film Sales 197 

DuMonl Network 130 

1 ilniuMc ... 195 

Foote, Cone and lidding .... 13 

Georgia [~rio 224 

Goodman, Harry 4 

Housewive's Protective League 61 

Intercollegiate Broadcasting System 71 

KARK, Little Rock 234 

KBIG, Los Angeles 211 

KCBS, San Francisco ...28.29 

Kin I . Salt Lake Cit) .. 165 

KKX, Portland, Ore . 59 

Keystone Broadcasting System 127 

KFMB. San Diego 146 

KFVI), Los Angeles 87 

KFYR, Bismarck 83 

KGVO, Missoula 75 

KMA, Shenandoah, la 6 

K.MBC, Kansas City _ 93 

KOWH, Omaha 35 

KPAC, Port Arthur .___ 93 

KPRC. Houston ... _ 25 

KQV, Pittsburgh .... 74 

KROD, El Paso . 92 

KROW, Oakland _ 12 

Kill, Tulsa ...._ 154 

Kudncr Agency 7 

KVOO, Tulsa 235 

KWFT, Wichita Falls 83 

KWJJ, Portland, Ore. .... 69 

KXEL, Waterloo _. ..._ 103 

K\(). El Centro 212 

KY \. San Francisco ._. ...... 208 

I alio and Love - 197 

McCann-Erickson ...... .10,11 

Mutual Broadcasting Svstcm .. . 18.49 

NBC Publi( Relations . 153 
NBC Spot Sales 97 

Paramount 1 V 141 

Peerless Film 195 

Precision Film .. 200 

Radiozark _ _ 31 

RCA Recording 30 

Sherman 199 

Standard Audit and Measurement 207 

Steinman stations liil 

Storer Broadcasting Company 62, 63 

I V Unlimited .. 199 

Unit) IV 188 

WAPX, Montgomery . 216 

WAV)- I V. Louisville .. 145 

WBAL, Baltimore 183 

WBAY, Green Baj 222 

WBBM, Chicago . 106, 107 

WBNS. Columbus, O. .... 80 

WBNS I V, Columbus, O. Ill 



Page 
W< U . Philadelphia .....32,33 

WCAV, Norfolk 117 

\V< lis, Charleston, \V. Va. 234 

WCSH, Portland, Me. 26 

WDAK, Columbus, Ga 92 

VVDBJ, Roanoke, Va _ 75 

WDBO, Orlando 60 

WDSU, New Orleans 205 

Weed and Company 125 

WF.VD, New York 93 

WFAA, Dallas HI 

WFAA-TV, Dallas _ 175 

WFBG, Altoona 79 

WFBL, Syracuse .... 94 

VVFBR, Baltimore 9 

WFIL, Philadelphia ... 75 

WGAR, Cleveland 57 

WGR, Buffalo 76 

WGTM, Wilson, N. C. . . 84 

WHAM, Rochester _ 109 

WHBF, Rock Island . 86 

WHBQ. Memphis 105 

WHDH. Boston .219, 221, 223, 225 

WHEC, Rochester 91 

WHEN, Syracuse _.. 34 

WHIO. Dayton 151 

WHO. Des Moines .... _ 21 

WHP, Harrisburg 184 

WIBC, Indianapolis 5 

WIBW, Topcka 209 

WIOD, Miami _ 70 

W.JAR-TV, Providence ... 142 

WJBK, Detroit 15 

WJLS, Beckley _.... 98 

WJR, Detroit 123 

WKOW, Madison . 87 

WKRG, Mobile 16 

WKZO, Kalamazoo ... ... 147 

WMAK, Nashville 210 

WMBG, Richmond Inside Front Cover 

WMT, Cedar Rapids 81 

WNAX, Yankton 113 

WNBQ, Chicago 173 

WNEB, Worcester __ 64 

WOOF, Dothan .... . 86 

WOR TV, New York Front Cover 

World Broadcasting System 22, 23 

WPAL. Charleston, S. C ... 129 

\\ PRO, Providence ..... ...... 115 

WQXR, New York . _ 73 

WRBL. Columbus, Ga . 82 

WRC, Washington 215 

WREC, Memphis _ 213 

WRFD, Worthington 4 

WRNL, Richmond . 87 

WSAZ IV, Huntington . .. 148 

WSBT, South Bend 85 

WSM-TV, Nashville ... 136 

WSOK. Nashville .. 77 

WSPA, Spartanburg 95 

WSI'D. loledo . 72 

WSRS, Cleveland 68 

WSYR, Syracuse 218 

WI AX, Springfield. 111. ... 214 

\\ I ( N , Minneapolis 36 

VVTIC, Hartford 201 

VA I Ml, Milwaukee _ 27 

WTVJ, Miami _ 143 

WVET, Rochcstei 84 

WWCA, Gary 78 

WWDC, Washington Back Cover 

WWJ, Detioit 55 

WWRL, Woodside 90 

WXEL, Cleveland _ 167 



^ oung ami Rubicam 



8 



Zenith ... 217 

Ziv, liede.ic W., Company 119, 120. 121 
Zi\ rclevision Programs 1 34, 13 r > 



234 



SPONSOR 



KVOO T/fotfAqain 




Adding new lustre to a long record of 
"firsts" in radio broadcasting is the 
"KVOO AREA DEVELOPMENT 
DEPARTMENT". Believing that our 
responsibilities extend into the future as 
well as the present, and that the needs 
and opportunities of the area we serve 
can be helped through better coordina- 
tion of area efforts and interests, KVOO 
established this new, full time depart- 
ment May 15th. 

Headed by Tom DeVore, formerly 
KVOO Program Director, the KVOO Area De- 
evelopment Department is now busily at work 
in cooperation with chambers of commerce, civic 
clubs, vacation and recreational groups, and other 
organizations whose prime interests are building 
a greater Southwest. 

This is the kind of broadminded, unselfish service 
which has built Oklahoma's Greatest Station to 
its present enviable stature. It is the kind of 




■■ COMPLETED 

W& AUTHORIZED 8 
APPROVED 

CURRENT PROJECTS 

TULSA AREA 
WATER DEVELOPMENT 



) 



Above map shows tremendous lake development in 
Eastern Oklahoma, Western Arkansas and Southwest 
Missouri where outstanding recreational and industrial 
opportunities are now being realized. This represents 
but a part of vast water and power resources available 
in KVOO area. 



service which makes advertising heard on this 
station have a great "plus value" for sponsors. 

If you want to put your product advertising first 
in this market use the first station in the area . . . 
It's KVOO, of course, Oklahoma's Greatest 
Station! 



RADIO STATION KVOO 



50,000 WATTS 



14 JULY 1952 



NSC AFFILIATE 

EDWARD PETRY AND CO., INC. NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



OKLAHOMA'S CREATEST STATION 



TULSA. OKLA 



235 



SPEAKS 



When you're in the buyer's seat in 
advertising, there's no more pleasur- 
able feeling than being equipped with 
the right tools; like having within your 
reach basic facts about the medium, 
the latest developments in each lacet 
and corner of the field, maps, price tab- 
ulations with handy descriptive data, 
and other things that it takes to go 
about the job of making shrewd rec- 
ommendations or decisions. We think 
that this year's Fall Facts issue offers 
all that, and more, neatly wrapped up 
in a concise, comprehensive package. 

Guesswork never makes a good sub- 
stitute for well marshalled facts. We 
believe that Mr. Advertiser and Mr. 
Agencyman can't help but find some- 
thing of practical and immediate value 
to him within these covers, and out of 
this discovery will come a natural urge 
to roam through the various sections, 
examining research charts, tables on 
costs and spending. 

Out of the massive collection of "tips 
to sponsors" that sponsor's editorial 
staff has garnered, the following are 
but a sample: 

1. Get in early with your orders for 
morning radio time — Agencies report 
that they're finding the situation tight 
on most of the top stations. The once 
considered more or less "marginal 
hours" between 6:00 and 9:00 a.m. 
continue to grow in value and there's 
a marked move to hike the rates here 
via reclassification of time. .Accounts 
like Silver Star blades find the stretch 
between 6:00 and 8:00 a rich vein not 
merelj in terms of impact but dollar 
value. Opportunities for a sponsor to 
get an effective sell on these morning 
man participating shows are getting 
•keener all the time, since the presiding 



personalities, as a rule, gain such ac- 
ceptance for themselves as to insure 
faith in what they say about a product. 

2. Look into late night TV partici- 
pating programs — An overwhelming 
number of stations program up to mid- 
night and beyond and participations in 
the film shows have proved a note- 
worthy buy for all types of products 
directed at adults (see 21 April SPON- 
SOR, page 28). 

3. Scan the list of network radio 
shows — Some of them have seen con- 
sistently successful sponsored service 
and can be had at an attractive price. 
You'll also find a few that have re- 
cently been debuted sustaining-wise, 
which could entice the audience you 
want and at the right price. Buying a 
program with a track record is the line 
of least resistance, but you can never 
tell but what one of the newcomers is 
more in keeping with current tastes or 
preferences. 



CUIDE TO FALL BUYINC 

Spread over the five question-ami- 
answer sections of this 236-page Fall 
Facts issue, sponsor's sixth, are tips 
on what radio and TV have available 
for sponsorship this fall, tips on good 
buys, and hundreds of facts that can 
be of immeasurable aid when buving. 

Highlighted in the issue, are the 
basics — radio, television, and interna- 
tional, sponsor this year for the first 
time presents a TV Basics, which in 
itself covers 12 pages. Radio Basics 
this year covers 15 pages more than 
last year. Indicative of its popu- 
larity is the fact that the reprint of 
last year's Radio Basics sold over 
30,000 copies. 

Highlighted on this j/age are sev- 
eral of the buying opportunities 
charted in this Fall Facts issue. 



4. Consult sponsor's film shows 
cliart — There are quite a number here 
with solid track records, half and 
quarter-hour films tailored for TV that 
can provide read\ access to stations 
where the schedules are more or less 
taut. Included are shows of radio 
origin whose film versions have been 
taring well on a national account's 
rather limited network lineup. You'll 
find this chart I starts page 189) comes 
in handy under your desk-glass or in 
your file if and when the problem of 



film buying or recommendation is 
brought up. 

5. Inquire about the availability of 
syndicated radio shows — You'll en- 
counter lots of topnotch fare that has 
racked up substantial audiences and 
performed crack selling jobs. The buy- 
ing pattern is tailored to your own re- 
quirements, either regional or local. 

6. Check on the availability of well- 
grooved late evening news on local ra- 
dio stations — A leading news sponsor 
of national proportions here and there 
has let go of news periods that have 
done him yeoman service through the 
year to tackle TV, but the odds are that 
these radio niches still pack plenty of 
punch for the money. 

7. Keep yourself apprised of the 
TV homemakers and interview pro- 
grams — This type of show, which spans 
the clock from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 
p.m., usually proves effective for both 
high acceptability and product turn- 
over for those who are primarily inter- 
ested in the housewife market. Pride 
in local personalities appears to be a 
major factor in giving the type a quick 
build, and as a rule it's a specially 
economical buy. 

This issue is the biggest and most 
fact-packed in the history of sponsor's 
Fall Facts series. It takes you through 
all stages of the radio business, net- 
work and spot, incisively covering 
trends, characteristics, the way each 
can be bought, and program opportu- 
nities. 

For the advertiser who is film-mind- 
ed there's an up-to-the-minute review 
of the field from all angles, a look- 
around at trends and programs. 

An innovation in this sixth Fall 
Facts issue is an international section, 
called International Basics. It will be 
read with interest not onlv in this coun- 
try but in many other countries 
throughout the world. It represents the 
most factual study yet published on 
international advertising with specific 
relation to air advertising. It contains 
about 1,400 facts and covers 50 coun- 
tries plus U. S. territories and posses- 
sions. Included is market data on 
radio-TV, newspapers, station reps, ad- 
vertisers, and agencies in the inter- 
national advertising field. 

We hope that Fall Facts proves as 
profitable in your everyday business 
operations as we found its preparation 
exhilarating. 



236 



SPONSOR 




Mzetyoc/r 



Who is he? He's the American Farmer, the 
current American capitalist. He's the real 
owner of his own business — and farming is big 
business today. 

He makes a lot, he saves a lot, he spends a lot. 
He's your best prospective customer. 

One-tenth of all these prosperous prospects for your 
product live in WLW-Land— One-tenth of America. 
The best way to reach them is by Radio . . . and the most 
effective and economical radio in this area is WLW. 

The full story of "Your Best Customer" — 
all the facts and figures— is on film. Ask to see it. 



WLW 



The Nation's Station 




BONUS 

in Washington 






When you buy WWDC in Washing-ton, you get a great big free bonus 
audience! A special survey by Pulse — made when no baseball or other 
special broadcasts were on the air — shows that WWDC has by far the 
largest out-of-home audience in the Washington area. 

Out of 504 time periods measured by Pulse, WWDC was first 302 
times, and tied for first 147 times. In other words, WWDC dominates this 
audience 94% of the time. 






And this out-of-home audience is big. U. S. 
Government figures show that the Washington 
market has 244,067 automobiles with radios. 



This big bonus audience that WWDC 
delivers advertisers is just one more reason 
why WWDC is the Washington station that 

sells goods. 



Your JOHN BLAIR man will give 
you all the details about WWDC's 
dominant position in this always-rich 
market. Call him soon. 

REPRESENTED BY JOHN BLAIR & CO. 




WASHINGTON, D. C. 



I 22 

, ik 20 m y 




use magazine lor Radio and TV advertisers 






28 JULY 1952 



50c per copy • $8 per year 



• 




<•> 





Advertisers learned 
plenty at the 
conventions 

page 24 



(How WFAA's Anniversary 
"Fair" boosted 
advertisers 

page 26 






2o 



In Los Angeles . . . 

RADIO REACHES JUST 1% 

Shooting for bigger sales in Los Angeles? 
Radio is your most effective weapon. Because 99% 
of all homes in metropolitan Los Angeles are radio 
homes. And of all Los Angeles radio stations, KNX 
scores highest, winning 41% more 14 -hour firsts 
than all other Los Angeles stations combined. (At 
night, when TV viewing is at its peak, KNX 



LESS THAN EVERYBODY! 

delivers 14.2% more families than the average TV 
station, too . . . at less than half the cost.*) You're 
sure to hit your sales target 99 times out of 
100 when you use 50,000-watt KNX. For details, 
call us or CBS Radio Spot Sales. 

KNX 

Los Angeles • CBS Owned 
Represented by CBS Radio Spot Sales 




SOURCES PULSE. MARCH APRIL 1952 • TELEPULSE. 



=RIL 1952 



SROS. MAY 1952 



3MB 1949 



(*CLASS A 



■JUTE BREAKSj 



"COST TOO MUCH", they said ... until 





WLS GETS RESULTS . 



Jf&i the 

AUTOMOTIVE 
SUPPLY INDUSTRY 



people started 

ttkmkfa\i)\ 



A certain manufacturer makes a tractor brake requiring 
original factory installation on new tractors. It can 
not be used for replacement. 

This brake is exceptionally high quality . . . and has 
an unusual safety factor . . . but is somewhat more costly, 
so most tractor manufacturers hesitated to use it. 
Their costs had already sky-rocketed . . . and they didn't 
think farmers would pay more for tractors with 
these better brakes. As a result, these brakes 
were available on only twenty-three 1950 models. 

An intensive advertising campaign on WLS "sold" the 

idea and advantages of these better brakes to 

farmers . . . and the demand thus created readily convinced 

leading tractor manufacturers. As a result, these brakes 

were offered on forty-eight 1952 models... 

and the brake manufacturer had $3,000,000 in orders. 

If you have a product or service of merit . . . you'll find 
the vast WLS audience equally receptive and 
responsive to sound reason and sincere appeal. 
Better see your John Blair man or contact us today. . . 
and add yours to the growing list of success stories 
being developed for WLS advertisers the nation over. 




890 KILOCYCLES, 50,000 WATTS, ABC NETWORK REPRESENTED BY JOHN BLAIR & COMPANY 



Vick's new cold 

syrup headed for 

spot radio-TV 



Cigarettes spend 

only 2/5 cent per 

pack for advertising 



Ennds air budget 
now $3,000,000 



Multiple sponsors 

better for 

conventions? 



Longines may 
be looking 

Film trend spurs 
executive transfers 



Telemeter points 

to Telethon 

as fee-TV success 



Survey holds 

stations 

responsible 

for TV morals 







Vick Chemical will use heavy radio and TV spot campaign this fall for 
its new cough sy rup, Cetamin. Schedule of one-minute radio announce- 
ments will take in major and secondary markets. TV lineup provides 
for about 20 markets. Use of both media will be coast to coast. 

-SR- 

0. Parker McComas, Philip Morris president, disclosed at stockholders* 
meeting cigarette industry's average for adver t ising^ is but two- 
fifths of cent per package. He cited this fact in relating industry's 
efforts to get tax relief and "a Congressman's" rejoinder industry 
could absorb tax increases by dropping advertising. McComas stated 
Federal Government gets $1,500,000 annually from cigarettes; states 
and cities, $500,000,000. 

-SR- 

Pearson Drug spending over $5,000, 000 in radio-TV for Ennds during 
next 12 months, concentrating on network shows. Includes Inner Sanc- 
tum, My Friend Irma, Police Story, all CBS, and Lights Out, NBC. 

-SR- 

Radio-TV experts of Democratic National Committee believe network s 
erred in selling Chicago Convention sponsorship to si ngle classi fica- 
tion of advertiser (appliances) and each network to single sponsor. 
They thought each network should have had multiple sponsorship for va- 
riety in commercials. (Cross-section of trade opinion on commercial 
treatment during convention broadcasts appears on page 24. ) 

-SR- 

Trade buzzing with report Longines-Wittnauer Watch open to agency 
switch. Account now with Victor A. Bennett Co. 

-SR- 

Increased transfer of executive personnel from New York to Hollyw ood 
by ad agencies, syndicators and others to meet st epped-u p trend toward 
film sho ws. Among syndicators latest switch is Herbert Gordon, Ziv 
vice president in charge production, who will make Hollywood his base 
of operations indefinitely. (See article covering economics of trend 
toward film programs on page 19. ) 

-SR- 

International Telemeter Corp. is citing as proof of boxoffice sound- 
ness for its fee-TV system — which is-pay-as-you-see — experience of 
recent Bob Hope -Bing Cro sby fund-raising Telethon. (Over $1,000,000 
pledged but relatively small portion redeemed.) Comments Telemeter: 
"The Q.E.D. seems to be that entertainment, no matter where it is 
sold, must be sold for cash." 

-SR- 

Woodbury College, in California survey dealing with TV's impact on 
viewers' daily habits, found 5 5% s et owner s polled thought stations 
should be responsible for m oral stan da rds TV programs ; 28% said it was 
up to advertiser. On query whether they would pay $1 to see telecast 
of major sports event in theater, 73% voted "no", but 55% answered 
they would pay that sum if sports telecast were in home. 



SPONSOR. Volume 6, No. 15. 28 July 1952. Published biweekly by SPONSOR Publications. Inc.. at 3110 Elm Ait . Baltimore, Md Executive. Editorial. Advertising. Circu- 
lation Offices 510 Madison Ave.. Xew York 22 $8 a year in I'. S $9 elsewhere. Entered as second class matter 29 January 1919 at Baltimore. Md postofflce under Act 3 March 1879. 



REPORT TO SPONSORS for 28 Julv 1952 



Radio specialists 
head key spots 
in NBC merger 



KFEL-TV on air 
within 10 days 
of permit grant 



TNT sets up 

division for 

meetings telecast 



BAB, Pulse 

offer data on 

out-of-home 

listening 



Negro radio 

wins strong 

listener loyalty 



Bing Crosby 

selling TV film 

through CBS 

C & W survey 

shows viewing 

grows with length 

of set ownership 



Nature realignment NBC organizational setup proving somewhat of puz- 
zler to trade. Especially with regard assignment d i rection of radio- 
TV merged top key departments — sale s and programing — to two radio 
specialists, John K. Herbert and C.iarles C. Barry, sales and program 
vice presidents, respectively. Under merger all NBC TV and radio 
operations both report to still another radio man, Frank White, gen- 
eral manager. Only explanation trade observers seem able conjure up 
for this concentration of authority in radio specialists is it could 
represent gesture of assurance to NBC radio affiliates. Chain of 
command has White reporting to Sylvester L. Weaver, Jr., who in turn 
reports to Joseph H.McConnell, NBC president. 

-SR- 

KFEL-TV, Denver, went on air (21 July) 10 d a ys after it got construc- 
tion permit , setting r ecor d among TV Stations. Station had purchased 
equipment many months before, and, after CP grant came through for 
channel 2, it prevailed upon FCC to give it special temporary author- 
ization. This may be beginning of series quick starts from among 
latest CP grantees. 

-SR- 

Theater Network Television has created a new division, Theater Tele- 
Sessions, to handle closed circuit live broadcasts of dealer, stock- 
holder and institutional meetings. Division will be directed by Vic- 
tor L. Ratner, former CBS advertising-promotion head and lately Macy's 
ad director. 

-SR- 

Broadcast Advertising Bureau, in brochure on auto sets, estimates 
count now around 24,500,000. This is 65% of nation's 57,000,000 auto- 
mobiles. Pulse survey of "going to work habits" (conducted in May 
1952) found that 842,750 persons in Los Angeles area, 74% of them 
traveling by auto, listen to radio while going to work. New York area 
study by Pulse gave this type of listening count as 907,960, with por- 
tion who travel by auto given as only 26%. 

-SR~ 

Increasing numbers of sponsors are beaming messages to Negroes via 
radio stations which set aside all or part of programing for Negro 
listeners. Stations have developed standing in Negro communities by 
deft combination of e ntertainment and public service programing. WEAS, 
Decatur, Ga. , for example, has programed for Negroes since going on 
air in July 1947. Station won citation for show which was credited 
with bringing about 58% decrease in juvenile delinquency. By such 
community-minded actions, Negro-appeal stations win l istening and buy - 
i ng loyalty. (Section covering Negro radio starts on page 29.) 

-SR- 

CBS-TV Film Sales has taken over the sales representation of Bing 
Crosby Enterprises* TV film Productions. Properties include C rown 
Th eatre, The Hank McCune Show, R eb ound and The Chair on th e Boulevard. 

-SR- 

Cunningham & Walsh's F ifth Annual Videotown Survey just completed 
discounts theory that longer family has TV set the l ess time it s pend s 
watching it. According to survey, older sets are in use for average 
5 hours daily and viewers in general are staying up half hour later 
than last year to watch TV. 



SPONSOR 



THROUGHOUT THE WCCO AREA... 

6 A.M. TO MIDNIGHT... 7 DAYS A WEEK. 





WCCO 

-delivers, on the average, 
a 32% bigger audience 

delivers a bigger audience 

during 3 out of 

every 4 quarter-hours 

-than the total audience 
of the next 30 stations in 
the area combined - 

at one-sixth the cost! 




BROWN 

BUFFALO 

BURNETT 

CARVER 

CASS 

CHIPPEWA (M.) 

CHIPPEWA (W.) 

CHISAGO 

CLARK (S.D.I 

CLARK (W.) 

CLEARWATER 

CODINGTON 

COTTONWOOD 

CROW WING 

DAKOTA 



DAY 

DEUEL 

DICKINSON 

DODGE 

DOUGLAS 

DUNN 

EAU CLAIRE 

EMMET 
FARIBAULT 
FILLMORE 
FREEBORN 
GOODHUE 
GRANT (M.) 
GRANT (S. D.) 
HAMLIN 



HENNEPIN 

HOUSTON 

HUBBARD 

IRON 

ISANTI 

ITASKA 

JACKSON (M.I 

JACKSON (W.) 

KANABEC 

KANDIYOHI 

KINGSBURY 

KOOCHICHING 

KOSSUTH 

LAC 
QUI PARLE 



LAKE 

LAKE OF THE 

WOODS 

LE SUEUR 

LINCOLN M 

LINCOLN (W. I 

LYON 

MARATHON 

MARTIN 

MCLEOD 

MEEKER 

MILLE LACS 

MINER 

MOODY 

MORRISON 



Source: WCCO Listener Diory, concluded by Benson and Benson, Inc. 

throughout WCCO's 50-/00% 8MB Day-Nigh) Area. Spring 1952 



MOWER 

MURRAY 

NICOLLET 

NOBLES 

OLMSTED 

OTTER TAIL 

PEPIN 

PIERCE 

PINE 

PIPESTONE 

POLK 

POPE 

PRICE 

RAMSEY 

REDWOOD 





SWIFT 




TAYLOR 




TODD 


RENVILLE 


TRAVERSE 


RICE 


M TREMPEALEAU 


ROBERTS 


WABASHA 


ROCK 


WADENA 


RUSK 


WASECA 


ST. CROIX 


WASHBURN 


ST. LOUIS 


1 WASHINGTON 


(NORTH) 


WATONWAN 


SAWYER 


WINONA 


SCOTT 


WRIGHT 


SHERBURNE 


YELLOW 


SIBLEY 


MEDICINE 


STEARNS 




STEELE 


w 


STEVENS 




WCCO 

Minneapolis 
-St. Paul 

50,000 
watts 

Represented 

by CBS 

Radio Spot 

Sales 



(Tfr 






EEQ 




ARTICLES 



Ss the rush to film shows economically sound? 

Some say film's high quality with the opportunity for amortizing costs through 
reruns make it a sponsor's best bet. Others are skeptical. Here are both sides 

Stocks on the air 

Something's happening to Wall Street — the Market is going middle class. Part 
of the credit for broadening the securities market must go to increased use of 
radio by brokers who are now finding radio produces leads at low cost 

Whttt sponsors learned at the conventions 

SPONSOR queried a cross-section of advertisers and agency executives to get 
opinions about convention commercials and their effectiveness. Most provoca- 
tive were the comments of radio-TV consultants to the Democratic Party 

WFAA's Anniversary "Fair"' boosted sponsors 

Station made its anniversary the occasion for merchandising sponsors' products 

NEGRO RADIO SECTION 



19 
22 

24 
2H 



The Neyro market: $15,000,000,000 to spend 

Recent strides, social and economic, of the American Negro have made him a 
first-class target for air advertising by sponsors in practically all categories 

l%eyro radio: 2®0-plus specialist stations 

Outlets for programing pinpointed at the Negro market are on the increase. So 
is the amount and quality of research they supply to advertisers 

Neyro radio: a picture summary of its strenyth 

Popping out of these picture pages is a visual explanation of Negro radio's 
vitality as a medium 

Selliny to Neyroes: don't talk down 

Using "Uncle Tom" approach wins an advertiser nothing but scorn. Tieing in with 
established local personalities is the key to successful selling 

JMeyro results stories: rich yield for all clients 

Local advertisers proved that the trick could be done, now the national "blue 
chips" are cashing in on pinpointed sales approaches 



COMING 



30 



32 



34 



36 



38 



28 July 1952 • Volume 6 Number 15 



C OMPLETE REPORT OI\ CANADIAN RADIO 



II 111 If HX J 



An entire section devoted to facts about Canada as a market, its radio adver- 
tising opportunities in detail, for the guidance of U.S. sponsors 

A TV station's first year of operation 

SPONSOR commissioned independent consultant Peter R. Levin to chart the 
cost of a TV station from application to first anniversary 




DEPARTMENTS 



MEN, MONEY & MOTIVES 6 

510 MADISON 8 

NEW AND RENEW 11 

MR. SPONSOR: N. P. Hutson 14 

P. S. 16 

RADIO RESULTS 40 

MR. SPONSOR ASKS . 42 

COMMERCIAL REVIEWS 46 
AGENCY PROFILE: C. MacCracken Z0 

ROUNDUP 52 

WHAT'S NEW IN RESEARCH 54 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 88 



Editor & President: Norman R. Glenr. 
Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper S>«on 
Executive Editor: Ben Bodec 
Managing Editor: Miles David 
Senior Editors: Charles Sinclair, Alfred J. Jaltfc 
Department Editor: Fred Birnbaum 
Assistant Editors: Lila Lederman, 
Richard A. Jackson, Evelyn Konrad 
Special Projects Editor: Ray Lapica 
Contributing Editors: Bob Landry, Bob Foremai 
Art Director: Donald H. Duffy 
Photographer: Jean Raeburn 
Vice President - Advertising: Norman Knight 
Advertising Department: Edwin D. Coopei 
(Western Manager), George Weiss (Travel- 
ing Representative, Chicago Office), Maxine 
Cooper (New York Office), John A. Kovchnk 
(Production Manager), Cynthia Soley, John 
McCormack 

Vice President - Business Mgr.: Bernard Piatt 
Circulation Department: Evolvn Sfltr I Sin 
srriDtion Manager! Emily Cutillo. Josephine 
Doloroso, Patricia Collins (Readers' Service) 
Secretary to Publisher: Auqusta Sriearmoi 
Office Manager: Olive Sherban 



Published biweekly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INr 
combined with TV. Executive. Editorial. Circulation, ana 
Advertising Offices: 511) Madison Ave.. New Tom ii 
N. V. Telephone: MT'rray Hill 8-2772. Chicago lim.f 
Hi] R. Crapd Ave.. Suite 110. Telephone: SI'perhT 1 «x«a 
Wesl Coast Offlre: 6087 Sunset Houlevard. I.o« Uiireh-. 
Telephone: Hillside SllSfl, Printing Offlre: 3111 Flu 
Ave.. Baltimore 11, Md. Subicrlptloni: I'nlted sta'-i 
*8 a year. Canada and foreign Jit Sinele copies Mic 
Printed in 17. S. A. Address all correspond-ric in in 
Madison Avenue. New York 22. N.Y. MT'rray lllll 8 2772 
Copyright 1952. SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



a 






"KWKH 

produces 
phenomenal 






returns 



» 




Says R. W. HODGE 

Vice-President, National Automotive Maintenance Ass'n 

As a successful automotive maintenance operator, and 
a top official in the NAMA, Mr. R. W. Hodge is doubly 
qualified to discuss KWKH's advertising value for mem- 
ber garages in the Louisiana- Arkansas-Texas area. 
Here's what he recently wrote us: 



••KWKH's Louisiana Hayride produced $140,000 
in financed business for the members of the Shreve- 
port Chapter NAMA during the year ended Feb. 1, 
1952. This was directly traceable to the Hayride 
since our finance plan was not advertised in any 
other way. We cannot say, definitely, how much 
cash business the show influenced, but all agree it 
was considerable* 

"This phenomenal return was in addition to the pres 
tige value of the advertising. I sincerely believe that 
KWKH's Louisiana Hayride is the most productive 
advertising we could possibly have bought. 




KWKH DAYTIME BMB MAP 

Study No. 2— Spring 1949 
KWKH's daytime BMB circulation is 303,230 families, 
daytime, in 87 Louisiana, Arkansas and Texas counties. 
227,701 or 75.0% of these families are "average daily 
listeners". (Nighttime BMB Map shows 268,590 families in 
112 Louisiana, Arkansas, Texas, New Mexico, Mississippi 
and Oklahoma counties.) 



(Signed) R. W. Hodge 



» 



50,000 Watts • CBS Radio 



KWKH 

A Shreveport Times Station 

Texas N i 



SHREVEPORT I LOUISIANA 



Arkansas 



The Branham Company 
Representatives 



Henry Clay, General Manager 




thaVs what 
you like about 
the South 9 s 

Baton Rouge 



. . . because your sale? story 
on WJBO. the booming voice 
of Baton Rouge, reaches the 
largest overall audience of any 
station in the market. 

The South, traditional land of 
cotton, has become the dynamic 
land of new industry. Baton 
Rouge typifies the South"s in- 
dustrial -- and agricultural - 
growth. Use Baton Rouge as a 
test market, or use it as part of 
an integrated marketing plan — 
but use it — for results! 



5,000 watt affiliate in Baton Rouge, La. 




AmilATED WITH THE STATE-TIMES AHO MORNING ADVOCATB 
FURTHER DATA FROM OUR NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 

GEORGE P. HOLLINGBERY CO. 



I«, il«| 



flumi 



a 




Robert J. Landry 



The myth of the barefoot boy 

In the year 1802 Eleuthere Irenee du Pont, from France, set up a 
small plant near Wilmington. Del., for the manufacture of black 
powder, an explosive for which there existed a booming demand in 
a new land of hunters, Indian-fighters and land-clearers. The black 
powder was to be used in 1805 against Barbary Pirates. Until 1832 
it was the sole product of the company. Then du Pont expanded 
into refined saltpeter, charcoal, acids and creosotes. By 1880, with 
the American Far West rapidly opening to settlers, du Pont added 
dynamite and nitroglycerine, invaluable aids to mining, quarrying, 
building and railroading. Today the gamut of products is dizzying 
but definitely no longer limited to work-aids for brawny males. Today 
du Pont is as close to the gals as their stockings, bras and girdles. 

* •>:- « 

The fact that du Pont currently celebrates 150 years of operation 
stands out, firstly, because of the fabulous saga itself, and, secondly, 
because singularly few American corporations can boast so long a 
span. A college professor sampling the manufacturers of western 
Pennsylvania recently established how very few companies were 75 
years old. But, interestingly, many were, or soon would be, 50 years 
of age. Probably a dozen big companies, most conspicuously the 
Ford Motor Company, are commemorating the half-century mark 

this very year, 1952. 

* * * 

When a big company clicks off 50 years and is still going strong, 
that fact assumes importance not alone as a case-study in the princi- 
ples I and personalities ) of management but as part of the over-all 
case for the so-called "American Way of Life." Instinctively, man- 
agement sees this. If not, trust public relations counsels or advertis- 
ing agencies to point it out. Typically, the 50th anniversary is cele- 
brated by plenty of special spending — all the way from special movies 
to special business biographies to expanded advertising. 

•X- « * 

Put this down as one part of "institutional advertising." itself a 
fairly new phenomenon. For a long time, during and after the first 
"Hundred Days" of the New Deal and the NRA, businessmen took a 
terrific emotional shellacking. For ordinarily opinionated chaps, 
many of them were strangely meek. Recovery of self-confidence and 
dislike for having themselves used as whipping boys finally produced 
tentative answers in the form of paid advertisements. In this sense, 
institutional advertising may be described as an uncertificated off- 
spring of the first two Roosevelt administrations. The utilities took 
the leadership in advertising their arguments, and it was the utilities, 
remember, that President Truman had in mind when he rapped "non- 
selling" advertising by corporations this spring. 

* * * 

Not all the copy used has been good. Some institutionals have been 
I Please turn to page 57) 

SPONSOR 




■■■■■: 

*■■■■ 

TM| -. 

'■■■■ 



how to make 
radio 

"JACK" 

be nimble 
...and quick! 



In Cleveland . . . Aeroways Flying School 

bought spots on a WHK participation 

show ... to encourage new enrollments. TWO 

spot announcements brought in FIFTEEN 

leads that resulted in THIRTEEN flying contracts. 

Aeroways Flying School did $6,000.00 

worth of NEW business for $64.20 ! 

yS. Jump to WHK for high-flying results ! 

3 




WHK 

CLEVELAND 

Represented by 
Headley-Reed Company 



28 JULY 1952 




1,000,000 letters 
inanwnanfli! 



This figure isn't fantasy — 
it's fact 1 Recently this year 
■ — in one single month — CKAC's 
"Casino de la Chanson" 
pulled in 1,060,000 replies, 
almost all containing proof of 
purchase. This fabulous 
quiz show has worked won- 
ders since it hit the air- 
waves — it can work wonders 
for your product, too. 
Ask us for details. 



CBS Outlet In Montreal 

Key Station of the 

TRANS-QUEBEC radio group 

CXAG 

MONTREAL 

730 on the dial • 10 kilowatts 

Representatives: 

Adam J. Young Jr. - New York, Chicago 

Omer Renaud & Co. — Toronto 




liiadisan 



DOUBLE-BILLING 

Double billing was some years ago a 
pretty vicious racket here as elsewhere. 
We at this station deplored it and it 
was hurting us because the innocent 
were tarred with the same brush as the 
guilty. 

We approached every appliance dis- 
tributor in the city, including Philco's 
Radio Specialty Company. We told 
them that there was a very simple way 
of eliminating the evil and of saving, 
by so doing, vast sums of money. Let 
the distributor buy the time — pay us 
the very much lower rate he would 
earn than any dealer could possibly 
enjoy. Then, let the distributor bill the 
dealer; if the dealer was playing it 
straight, he'd save money too because 
he would earn the advantage of the dis- 
tributor's low earned rate. And dou- 
ble-billing would be a dead duck. 

Result, but for Admiral's factorv 
branch: zero! But they all said they'd 
O.K. dealer's use of our station — which 
meant that the failure of our effort did 
not indicate non-acceptance of our sta- 
tion. 

Frankly, I think the writer of your 
article is a little naive. In the first 
place, appliance manufacturers do not 
consider co-op advertising as "advertis- 
ing." They consider it a sales lever. 
By approving an advertising budget for 
a dealer, they stock the dealer. So it's 
simply sales expense and not advertis- 
ing expense. 

In the second place, the kind of in- 
stitutional generalized copy that dis- 
tributors send out would never sell a 
nationally advertised appliance for any 
one dealer who spends his money, even 
if his money is only 50% of the total. 
It might advertise "X Brand Washer" 
but "X Brand Washer" is on sale at 
thousands of stores, all at the same 
price. 

In the third place, most of these dis- 
tributors O.K. 75-25 for newspapers, 
sometimes 100% for TV and, at the 
most, 50-50 for radio. So radio could 
be a poor buy, competitively, for an 
honest dealer. 

In the fourth place, I have never yet 
heard of an appliance distributor pay- 
ing talent costs (unless it is for syndi- 
cated shows which he supplies). 



Sure, double-billing is a vicious rack- 
et. It should be eliminated or it will 
hurt radio even more badly. 

In our case, we have become so dis- 
gusted with appliance dealers demand- 
ing it that our salesmen are prohibited 
from soliciting appliance accounts. 

But if the distributor means what he 
says, why doesn't he buy the time him- 
self — on the basis of the lowest cost- 
per-1,000 he can get — and make his 
own deals with his retailers? 

He won't in radio but he will in 
newspaper. 

Jerome Sill, General Manager 
WMIL, Milwaukee 

• On the point of the writer being a "little 
naive," Mr. Sill appears to be indulging in 
semantics. Granted that an appliance company's 
sales department uses co-op advertising as a sales 
lever, the source of the money spent on co-op 
docs not come from the sales manager's fund hut 
rather from the company's national advertising 
appropriation. The manufacturer prepares the 
copy for such co-op advertising and the arrange- 
ment with the dealer stemmed originally from 
the fact that the national advertiser would there- 
by be able lo pay less than the national rate 
for newspapers. 



In your current issue there is an ar- 
ticle on the evils of double billing. 

As a member of the Co-operative Ad- 
vertising Committee of the Association 
of National Advertisers, as well as be- 
ing administrator of large sums for co- 
operative advertising, I am apprecia- 
tive of any help in discouraging this 
nefarious practice. I know that it is 
widespread among radio stations, par- 
ticularly with those that do not have 
network affiliations, and also among 
the small newspapers and some not so 
small. It is wasting millions of dollars 
that would otherwise be spent for busi- 
ness producing advertising. 

R. H. Harrington, Adv. Mgr. 
The General Tire & Rubber Co. 



AGENCIES AND TV 

We were all very flattered here in the 
office over the very nice things you said 
about our agency in your editorial. It 
was certainly a good way to prove 
some of the readership of sponsor to 
us, because we have received many, 
many comments from many different 
sources. In fact, your editorial couldn't 
have been better timed. It so hap- 
pened I was making a call on a large 
Midwest advertiser the week this partic- 
ular issue came out. The top brass in 
the advertising department had already 
read your article and complimented us 
{Please turn lo page 67) 



SPONSOR 



Tiruovu 







WREC prestige doesn't come out of 

thin air . . . Audience preference comes 
first to create listener-confidence in 

Memphis No. 1 Station. This "Magic 
Touch" in programming is the result of 
keeping in close touch with the people 
of this great and growing area. (That 
WREC has the highest Hooper rating 

of any Memphis station is the proof!) 
Keeping programming quality high and 
costs LOW works like magic for 
advertisers, too! WREC gives top 
coverage in this market of over 

$2,000,000,000 at 10.1% lower rates 
per thousand listeners than in 1946! 

Let WREC put a touch of SALES 
magic in your advertising program. 




MEMPHIS NO. 1 STATION 



28 JULY 1952 



WAVE 

RAOIO SALES 

I9S2 




"Should I chop a hole 

in the ceiling, boss?" 

WAVE'S national radio sales in the first five months of 1952 are 
up 41.68% over 1951 — and 1951 itself was an excellent 
year for WAVE radio! 

It's cause and effect, gentlemen. WAVE radio delivers an 
extremely high percentage of the 698,148 radio sets within 60 miles 
of Louisville— -can deliver 1.000 impressions for only 376! 
Get all the facts from Free & Peters! 



5000 WATTS 



NBC 



WAVE 

LOUISVILLE 




Free & Peters, Inc.. Exclusive National Representatives 



10 



SPONSOR 



SMIS1I 



New and renew 



2 8 JULY 1952 



1. 



2. 



3 



4. 



>«*«• on Radio 

SPONSOR 



Ford Motor Co iFord divi 

General Foods Corp 

Ceneral Foods Corp 

Ceneral Mills Inc 
Ceneral Mills Inc 

Liggett & Myers Tobacco 

Co 
P. Lorillard Co 

Naumkeag Steam Cotton 

Co 
Owen-Corning Fiberglas 

Corp 
Philco Corp 

R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co 
Toni Co 

United States Steel Corp 



Networks 

AGENCY 



STATIONS 



). Walter Thompson 

Foote. Cone & Belding 

Benton & Bowles CBS 151 

Knox Reeves ABC 172 

Dancer-Fitzgerald- ABC 274 

Sample 

Cunningham & Walsh NBC 190 

Lennen & Mitchell NBC 190 

Jackson MBS 514 

Fuller & Smith & Ross CBS 186 

Hutchins ABC 350 

William Esty NBC 179 

Tatham-Laird ABC 275 

BBDO NBC 187 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



eob Trout & the News; M 10:30-35 pm; T, W 

10-10:05 pm; 30 Jun; 27 wks 
Bob Trout & the News, Th, Sun 10-10:05 pm; 

3 Jul; 26 wks 
Bob Trout & the News; F 10-10:05 pm; 4 Jul; 

26 wks 
Bill Ring Show; M-F 12:30-45 pm; 30 Jun; 52 wks 
Cal Tinney; M-F 4-4:30 pm; 30 Jun; 52 wks 

Dean Martin & Jerry Lewis; T 9-9:30 pm; 16 

Sep; 52 wks 
Two tor the Money; T 10-10:30 pm; 30 Sep; 52 

Paula Stone Show; T, Th 10:15-30 am; 22 Jul; 

52 wks 
Arthur Codfrey; alt days M-F 10:15-30 am; 2 

Sep; 52 wks 
Edwin C. Hill & the Human Side of the News; 

M-F 10:30-35 pm; 1 Sep; 52 wks 
Vaughan Monroe; W 8-8:30 pm; 3 Sep; 52 wks 
It Happens Every Day T, Th 2:30-35 pm, 10:30-35 

pm; 1 Jul; 52 wks 
Theatre Cuild on the Air; Sun 8:30-9:30 pm ; 14 

Sep; 52 wks 



Renewed on Radio Networks 



SPONSOR 


AGENCY 


STATIONS 


American Chicle Co 


Dancer-Fitzgerald- 
Sample 


ABC 


275 


American Chicle Co 


Dancer- Fitzgerald- 
Sample 


ABC 


260 


American Oil Co 


Joseph Katz 


CBS 


81 


Campbell Soup Co 


Ward Wheclock 


CBS 


167 


Chesebrough Mfg Co 


McCann-Erickson 


CBS 


183 


Colgate- Pa Imolive-Peet 


Ted Bates 


CBS 


192 


Electric Auto-Lite Co 


Cecil & Presbrey 


CBS 


184 


Theo Hamm Brewing Co 


Campbell-Mithun 


CBS 


20 


Kraft Foods Co 


Needham, Louis & 
Brorby 


NBC 


169 


National Biscuit Co 


McCann-Erickson 


CBS 


193 


Pabst Sales Co 


Warwick & Legler 


CBS 


192 


Procter & Camble Co 


Compton 


CBS 


128 


Procter & Camble Co 


Dancer-Fitzgerald- 
Sample 


CBS 


135 


Procter & Camble Co 


Benton & Bowles 


CBS 


153 


Rexall Drug Co 


BBDO 


CBS 


190 


Whitehall Pharmacal Co 


John F. Murray 


NBC 


141 


Whitehall Pharmacal Co 


John F. Murray 


NBC 


129 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Defense Attorney; Th 8:30-9 pm; 3 Jul; 52 wks 

Top Cuy; F 8-8:30 pm; 4 Jul 52 wks 

Edward R. Murrow M-F 7:45-8 Dm; 30 Jun; 52 wks 
Club 15; M, W. F 7:30-45 pm; 25 Aug; 52 wks 
Dr. Christian W 8:30-9 pm; 15 Oct; 52 wks 
Our Miss Brooks Sun 6:30-7 pm; 5 Oct; 52 wks 

Suspense; M 8-8:30 pm; 29 Sep; 52 wks 

Edward R. Murrow; M-F 7:45-8 pm; 30 |un; 52 

wks 
Great Gildersleeve; W 8:30-9 pm; 24 Jul; 59 wks 

Arthur Codfrey; M-F 11-11:15 am; 1 Sep; 52 wks 
Pabst Blue Ribbon Bouts; W 10 pm to conclusion; 

1 Oct; 52 wks 
Lowell Thomas; M-F 6:45-7 pm; 30 |un; 52 wks 
Beulah; M-F 7-7:15 pm; 30 |un; 52 wks 

Jack Smith; M-F 7:15-30 pm; 30 Jun; 52 wks 
Amos & Andy; Sun 7:30-8 pm; 28 Sep; 52 wks 
Just Plain Bill; M-F 5-5:15 pm; 27 Jun; 52 wks 
Front Page Farrell; M-F 5:15-30 pm; 27 |un; 52 
wks 



New National Spot Radio Rusiness 



SPONSOR 


PRODUCT 


AGENCY 


STATIONS-MARKET | CAMPAIGN, start, duration 


American Cyanamid Co 


Tobacco plant 
spray 


Hazard (N.Y.I 


Ky., N. C. Anncmts; Oct; 13 wks 



National Rroatlcast Sales Executives 

NAME FORMER AFFILIATION 



Robert M. Adams 
Joseph C. Beal 



NEW AFFILIATION 



WOL, Wash., prom mgr 
WDSU-TV, New Orleans, 
sultant 



tv prog con- 



WRC. WNBW, Wash., prom dir 
Same, tv prod mgr 






u 




In next issue: New and Renewed on Television (Network and Spot) ; 
Station Representation Changes; Advertising Agency Personnel Changes 



Numbers after names 

refer to New and Re- 
new category 

S. L. Werner I I I 

Frank White (4) 

Robt. M. Adams i It 

Carroll Foster I 1 I 

//. R. Krelstein I I ) 



28 JULY 1952 



11 



28 JULY 1952 



\eiv and renew 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 







5. 



6. 



Lambert B. Beeuwkes 
0. R. Bellamy 
Ford Billings 



Robert F. Blair 
Edward V. Cheviot 

Joseph N. Curl 
Richard de Rochemont 
Robert DeVinny 
Edward R. Eadeh 
Ceorge Ellis 
Henry Flynn 
Carroll Foster 
Mahlon A. Glascock 
Rodney F. lohnson 
Charles L. Kelly 
Robert Klaeger 
Harold R. Krelstein 
Charles H. Larson 
Phil Lewis 

Howard W. Maschmeier 
William F. Miller 
Walter S. Newhouse |r 
Abe Plough 
William B. Rudner 
Richard S. Salant 

Robert W. Sarnoff 
Arden Swisher 
Sherril Taylor 
Cuy Vaughan Jr 
Sylvester L. Weaver )r 
Frank White 



WDAS, Phila., gen mgr 

WLW, Cine, exec 

Creer Radio Stations, W. Va., 0., gen 

mgr (WA|R, Morgantown & WDNE, 

Elkins, W. Va., W|ER, Dover, 0.) 
Eastern sis rep 
San Antonio Light, San Antonio, gen 

adv mgr 
ABC, N.Y., tv spot sis acct exec 
March of Time, N.Y., exec prod 
Midwestern sis 

ABC, N.Y., dir coverage, market research 
Ziv, N.Y., sis mgr 
CBS, N.Y., asst sis mgr radio spot 
KiRO, Seattle, dir public affairs 
Kal, Ehrlich & Merrick, Wash., acct exec 
Broadcast exec 

WMAL-AM-FM-TV, Wash., prog dir 
Transfilm, N.Y., head motion picture prod 
WMPS, Memphis, vp-gen mgr 
Broadcast exec 
WCCO, Mnpls., sis staff 
WPTR, Albany, prog dir 
KMOX, St. L., N.Y. sis rep 
WQXR, N.Y., acct exec 
WMPS, Memphis, pres 
WMPS, Memphis, stn dir 
Rosenman, Coldmark, Colin & Kaye, NY., 

gen counsel 
NBC, N.Y., vp 
KOIL, Omaha, comml mgr 
KNX Radio-CPN, L. A., sis prom mgr 
WSPA, Spartanburg, S. C, sis mgr 
NBC, NY., tv net vp 
NBC, N.Y., exec 



WLAW, 8oston, gen mgr 
WPTR, Albany, gen mgr 
Robert S. Keller, N.Y., exec 



Cuild Films, Cleve., sis mgr ( 1900 Euclid Ave) 
WOAI-TV, San Antonio, comml mgr 

WOV, N.Y., sis mgr 

Transfilm, N.Y., prod-consultant 

Cuild Films, Chi., sis mgr (20 East |ackson Bldv. I 

DuMont, N.Y., research dept mgr 

lerry Fairbanks, N.Y., sis mgr 

Same, eastern sis mgr 

Same, asst to pres 

WMAL-AM-FM-TV, Wash., dir radio-tv sis 

KWJI, Portland, Ore., pres-gen mgr 

Same, asst gen mgr 

Same, prod vp 

Same, pres-gen mgr 

KWJ), Portland, Ore., exe: asst 

Same, sis mgr 

Same, asst to gen mgr 

WCBS, N.Y., gen sis mgr 

Katz, N.Y., radio sis staff 

Same, exec committee chairman 

Same, vp-stn dir 

CBS, N.Y., vp, gen exec 

Same, also head film div 

Same, gen mgr 

Same, sis prom, adv, exploitation dir 

WIST, WIST-FM, Charlotte, N. C, managing dir 

Same, radio-tv net vp 

Same, radio-tv net vp-gen mgr 



I 



Sponsor Personnel Changes 

NAME FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Roland P. Campbell 

Harry W. Chesley |r 
jack R. Creen 
j. Harvey Howells 
William Kalan 
William H. Scully 



General Foods, Battle Creek, prod mgr (Post 

Cereals div) 
Pepsi-Cola, N.Y., vp 

Leo Burnett, Chi., media research analyst 
Lever, N.Y., adv mgr (Good Luck prod div) 
Schwerin Research, N.Y., client relations vp 
Lever, N.Y., adv brand mgr (Lever div) 



Andrew (ergons, Cincinnati, adv vp 

Philip Morris, N.Y., vp 

Toni, Chi., assoc adv mgr 

Same, adv mgr (Lever div) 

Toni, Chi., assoc adv mgr 

Same, adv mgr (Good Luck prod div) 



I%ctv Agency Appointments 



SPONSOR 


PRODUCT (or service) 


Balm Barr Inc, Chi. 


Balm Barr lotion 


Bonide Chemical Co, Utica 


Household products 


Bostwick Laboratories, Bridgeport 


Moth proofing product 


Byrne Products Inc, N.Y. 


Proprietary preparations 


California Marine Curing & Packing Co, 


Tuna, sardines 


Terminal Island, Cal. 




Candyland Inc, Sioux City, la. 


Marshmallows 


Cocilana Inc, Bklyn. 


Cloro-Nips cough drops 


Delaware Valley Dairy, Trenton, N. |. 


Dairy products 


Dr. Shor's Products Inc, Phila. 


Chlorophyll toothpaste 


Globe Pharmaceutical Distributing Co, Chi. 


Burn-Aid medicated bandage, oint- 




ment 


Harris Chemical Co, Cortland, N.Y. 


Fly-Ban fly killer 


Hudson Dealers of Southern California, L. A. 


Automobile dealers 


Ideal Bakery, Batesvillc, Ark. 


Baked goods 


Imperial Knife Associated Companies, N.Y. 


Household cutlery 


J-A Corp, Chi. 


Lemon Quick powdered lemon con- 




centrate 


Keelor Steel Inc, Mnpls. 


Nu-Wrinkl lawn edging 


Kellogg Co, Battle Creek 


| All products 


Lewis Brothers Bakeries, Anna, III. 


Baked goods 


Lux Co, Elkhart, Ind. 


Household products 


Pervo Paint Co, L. A. 


Paints 



AGENCY 



H. W. Kastor, Chi. 
Farquhar, Utica 
Marfree, N.Y. 
Admiral, N.Y. 
Mogge-Privett, L. A. 

Hilton & Riggio, N.Y., Atlas, Sioux 

City 
Al Paul Lefton, N.Y. 
N. W. Ayer, Phila. 
Herbct B. Shor, Phila. 
Schwimmer 6 Scott, Chi. 

Marfree, N.Y. 

Erwin, Wasey, L. A. 

Action, Memphis 

Wilson, Haight & Welch, N.Y. 

Buchanan, Chi. 

Graves, Mnpls. 

Leo Burnett Co, Chi. (eff 1 Oct) 

Action, Memphis 

Marfree, N.Y. 

Hixson & (orgensen, L. A. 



Numbers after names 
refer to New and Re- 
new categoi i 

1/. A. Glascock (4) 

R. de Rochemont I 1 1 

Joseph C. Heal 111 

Phil Lewis (4) 

/•.. R. Eadeh (4) 



R. W. Sarnoff (4) 
Joseph N. Curl (4) 
If . S. Newhouse (4) 
/.. /?. Beeuwkes (4) 
//. W. Chesley (5) 




12 



SPONSOR 



OUT OF THE FRYING PAN 

. . . into the Panhandle 





/% Nineteenth Century booster, writing to a 
New England friend, described some of the 
Texas Panhandle's paradoxes. "Ranch houses 
are ten miles from the front gate. We have more 
cows and less milk, more preachers and less 
religion, more climate and less rain, more rivers 
and less water, more hot days and more cold 
nights, than any place in the world. We also 
have some characters who ought to be roped and 
hung. All we need is more water and a better 
class of people." 

The friend replied. '"That's all hell needs." 



surrounded by oil fields, wheatlands, cattle 
ranches and prospering farms. The days are still 
hot, the nights are still cold, but there's no better 
class of people anywhere. 

With the highest retail sales in the Nation 
($1728 per capita, $5490 per family- Sales 
Management) . Amarillo owes much to its vast 
trading area. Shopping center for two million 
persons in 78 counties. Amarillo is also the home 
of KGNC. the one (and only) ad medium which 
covers the entire trade territory. 



We're happy to report progress on practically 
all counts. Justice, no longer dispensed with a 
rope, flourishes in a flourishing countryside. 
Amarillo, scene of the world's largest cattle auc- 
tions (19S1 volume in excess of $53 million), is 



KGNC 




marillo 



NBC AFFILIATE 



710 KC • 10,000 WATTS 

28 JULY 1952 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY THE O. L. TAYLOR COMPANY 



13 




AUKEE 



ONE OF 

INDEPENDENT 
RADIO STATIONS ! 

IN MARKETS OVER 500,000 




Source: Hooper Radio Audience Indexes 
Unaffiliated Radio Stations Mar.- 
Apr., 1952. 

and in milwaukee. .. 

For $100 per week or more, WEMP 
delivers 2 times the audience of 
network station No. 1 and IVz 
times the audience of network 
station No. 2*. 

*A11 Hooperatings based on Oct. -Feb. 
1952 Comprehensive, using highest indi- 
vidual 15-minute strip rating 8:00 a. m. 



WEMP 



WEMP-FM 



HOURS OF MUSIC, NEWS, SPORTS 
HUGH BOICE, JR., Gen..Mgr. 
HEADLEY-REED, Nat'l Rep. 






IrJpiiw 



Norman P. Hutson 

President 
Frank H. Fleer Corporation, Philadelphia 

Fifty-year-old Norman P. Hutson is a genial executive playing a 
dual role. In Philadelphia, after business hours, he works actively 
as vice president and director of the Philadelphia Society for Crip- 
pled Children. The kids, for the most part, don't know about this 
humanitarian work. They do know, however, about Hutsons favorite 
product. Fleer's Dubble Bubble gum. 

Part of Fleer's success can be attributed to its willingness to gamble 
or experiment with media. Thus, by 1940, when Hutson joined 
the company as executive assistant to the president, it was ready to 
go into radio. Fleer's bought Don Winsloiv of the Navy on nine sta- 
tions. The cost was about $150-200,000. 

Hutson, in the agency business during the late 20's and early 30's, 
was able to look at this venture analytically. Behind him were many- 
years with such top-notchers as Frank Finney and Sturges Dorrance, 
and much activity in management, sales and advertising counseling. 

About the Don Winslow campaign Hutson says: "The sales in- 
crease was very noticeable but nevertheless not sufficient on our 1£ 
product to warrant its continuance." 

But war finished further media speculation. A vital ingredient 
used to make bubble gum comes from the East Indies. With this 
supply cut off Dubble Bubhle production stopped. When it came 
back in 1945 demand was so heavy that little advertising seemed 
necessary. That is, on the surface. Then Hutson thought of Fleer's 
10-12.000 jobbers and 500.000 dealers all banking on repeat sales. It 
was this that paved the way for Fleer's newest air entry, an ABC TV 
network show called Puds Prize Party (through Lewis & Gilman I . 

Hutson thinks this Saturday morning effort featuring charades and 
games enacted by kids as well as viewer contests will bring repeat 
sales. "Every additional sale costs some kid a penny,'' explains 
Hutson, "of which we get about half. We must get repeat sales if 
our advertising is to pay off." With about $200,000 invested in the 
-how Hutson is sure the \ enture ol "the only, penny confection in 
television" will have almost every kid viewer in the country blowing 
bubbles in front of his TV set. 

Futson's interests, asides from keeping the kids entertained, in- 
clude a non-sum chewing Dalmatian and a rare game ol tennis. * * * 



14 



SPONSOR 



Here's one for the book(s), 



Mr. Advertiser! 





BOOK ORDERS TRIPLED 



by publishers advertising on 



• One form of advertising that must show 
results, quickly and unquestionably, is adver- 
tising for mail-order purchase of books. 

Two of the outstanding leaders in this 
field . . Doubleday & Co. and the Grolier 
Society. . have again proved that WBZ stands 
in a class by itself for consistent results in the 
New England market. 

Writes Joe Gans of Thwing & Altman, 
agency for both publishers: "This year we 
more than doubled our previous best season 
in total number of broadcasts on WBZ. We 
more than tripled the number of orders re- 
ceived—at a substantially lower cost per order. 
To put it another way, we carried a larger 
schedule over a longer period of time, and 
accomplished one of our greatest success 




BOSTON • 50,000 Watts 

stories. WBZ seems to be getting more power- 
ful each year!" 

Are you taking advantage of WBZ's unique 
and widespread influence in all six New 
England states? If you're looking for record- 
making results in this responsive market, get 
in touch now with WBZ or Free & Peters. 



Westinghouse Radio Stations Inc KDKA.WOWO-KEX-KYW-WBZ.WBZA. WBZ-TV 

National Representatives, Free & Peters, except for WBZ-TV; for WBZ-TV, NBC Spot Sales 
RADIO - AMERICA'S GREAT ADVERTISING MEDIUM 



28 JULY 1952 



15 



TIME 



TL 



us 

EXPLOITATION 

PROMOTION 

PUBLICITY 



EQUALS 



KFWB 



LOS ANGELES 

ENTERPRISE! 

THE MOST SATISFIED time buy- 
ers are those who have dis- 
covered that in selecting 
KFWB in Los Angeles they 
consistently secure the most 
— in terms of extra promo- 
tion, exploitation and ad- 
vertising — for their clients. 

KFWB in the first six months of 
1952 used more 24 sheets 
and newspaper space to ex- 
ploit its advertisers' pro- 
grams than any other sta- 
tion in Americas' second 
largest market. 

IN THESE DAYS you want MORE 
than time . . . MORE for 
your dollar . . . KEWB 
gives it to you in PROMO- 
TION AND SHOWMAN- 
SHIP. 

CALL BRAN HAM ... Let them 
show you what KFWB can 
do for your clients in Los 
Angeles! 



THE 

BRANHAM 

COMPANY 



27mns 

of service in 

America's 

THIRD LARGEST 

MARKET 



NEW YORK 
CHICAGO 
SAN FRANCISCO 
LOS ANOILIS 

CHARIOTTI 
OETROIT 

ATLANTA 
MIMPHIS 
ST. LOUIS 

DALLAS 



KFHfB 

LOS ANGELES 



HARRY MAIZUSH 



iVew? developments on SPONSOR stories 




See: 

Issue: 
Subject: 



"Why K<5W merchandising went on 
the road" 

16 June 1952, p. 43 

Radio station builds audience impact 
bv taking show on the road 



A big factor in stepped-up merchandising by radio stations, is the 
"get out and meet the people" approach. Stations like WNAX, Yank- 
ton, S. D., with its touring Missouri Valley Barn Dance, have long 
realized the value to sponsors of personal appearances of shows or 
talent. And recently SPONSOR told of the sales promotional success 
KGW, Portland enjoyed when it brought live talent to entertainment- 
hungry small communities. 

Still another adherent of personal appearances is WIF. Philadel- 
phia, with its Kitchen Kapers, a quiz show aired 10:30 to 11:00 a.m. 
daily. The program appears weekly in various communities in and 
around Philadelphia and nearby New Jersey. WIP cites these ad- 
vantages of touring the show: (1) it gives a different local sponsor 
an opportunity to sponsor the show each week; (2) it affords heavy 
local merchandising impact for the sponsor among chain and inde- 
pendent store operators in the area where the show is playing and 
( 3 I it attracts completely different audiences at each showing, thus 
building listener-following. (Road appearances take place in the 
evening, consist of three half-hour programs which are recorded on 
the spot. These programs are broadcast the following week.) 

WTien an advertiser contracts to sponsor a Kitehen Kapers road 
appearance, about six weeks in advance WIP sends him a kit with 
complete instructions on how to give the show the strongest possible 
promotion. The kit includes, among other material, pre-printed pos- 
ters and tickets, both carrying the sponsor's name, sample press re- 
lease, suggested newspaper ad layout and complete publicity plan. 
To assure prominent counter displays of sponsor products and ade- 
quate stocking, a WIP merchandising man covers all major stores 
in the area one to two weeks in advance of the show's appearance. 

Among sponsors using the show are The Dracket Company; G. F. 
Heublein & Bro.; LaFrance (General Foods; Nestea; Southern 
Fruit Distributors: Milani's 1890 French Dressing; Krev Packing.) 



''TVs hottest problem : public rela- 
tions" 

16 June 1952, p. 27 

TV, attacked most by the nation's 
highbrows, wins over a prominent 
intellectual 

Television's most persistent critics have been among the nation's 
intellectual elite — writers, journalists, professors. But recently, one 
previously-anti-TV highbrow confessed that he has discovered certain 
good things about video which have won him over. This "convert" 
is author Louis Bromfield. He was recently quoted in the Cleveland 
Plain Dealer as saying : 

"It seems to me that television excels in the field of plays and 
vaudeville. The level of good plays and productions which interest, 
entertain, hold the attention and rank very high in the field of quality, 
is far higher than the record of Broadway, and infinitely higher 
than the abysmal record of Hollywood during the past few years. 

"I think there are a lot of reasons for this: 1 1) There is a definite 
time limit; movement and form must be brisk and the performer 
must be on his toes; (2) there are limits of time and space and money 
which prevent great "productions" of rotten banana lushness which 
try to make up for the poverty of material and talent; (3) there 
can't be any retakes to patch up the lack of talent in a performer." 




16 



SPONSOR 



Salesmaker for the Nation's Smokers 



For twelve years Prince Albert's Grand 
Ole Opry via NBC has played a domi- 
nant role in keeping the tidy red pocket 
tin out in front as the favorite tobacco 
for smokers of pipes and "makin's" 
cigarettes. 

Prince Albert's Grand Ole Opry 
originates at WSM, employs WSM 
talent exclusively, is an integral part of 
that 26 year old, four hour long Grand 
Ole Opry which has, virtually single 
handedly shifted the musical center of 
gravity to Nashville ... Music City, USA! 



Nashville 650 



CLEAR CHANNEL - 50,000 WATTS 

IRVING WAUGH, Commercial Manager 
EDWARD PETRY, National Represen taiive 




***** ^^ ^McM^J^k69PXc^X^A<^lc^Xc^MW 

28 JULY 1952 



17 




Speak of sports in the Carolinas and 3.000,000 
listeners think of WBT's Lee Kirby. His 15-year 
record as play-by-play artist for Atlantic Refining 
Company ranks him with the nation's best. His WBT 
sportscast currently draws a 15.1 Pulse rating for 
a 59% share-of-audience. Two more significant 
examples of the pre-eminent power of WBT local 
personalities — and WBT itself. 



COLOSSUS OF THE CAROLINAS 




CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Jefferson Standard Broadcasting Company 



Represented Nationally by CBS Radio Spot Sales 




Ruthrauff & Ryan group plotting details of "Big Town" film 
series which is Hollywood produced. L to r. Sidney 



Sloan, executive producer; Frederick B. Ryan, Jr., R & R 
president; and Norman Matthews, production supervisor 



Is the rush to film 
shows economically sound ? 

Complex factors make this hot controversial issue among admen 



■BtJ \UCIK 

^B long ago asking a ng them- 
selves: Is TV destined to be- 
come an electronic Hollywood? 

In light of what's happening right 
now some of them are convinced that 
the question — with respect to dramatic 
shows — has already been answered in 
the affirmative. Others of the ad fra- 
ternity admit they are perplexed bv the 
upsurge of TV film but they don't think 
film is going to prove the solution to 
the problem of high TV costs. 

Here's what's happening. Network 
sponsors of half-hour dramatic pro- 
grams are rushing pell mell to film. 

28 JULY 1952 



This fall the ratio of live to film among 
programs of this type will probably be 
well over two to one in film's favor. At 
the present rate, 70% of straight dra- 
ma and situation comedy shows may 
be on film by the end of the 1952-53 
network cycle. Underscoring the sig- 
nificance of the trend is the fact that 
30-minute dramatic programs domi- 
nate network nighttime schedules. 

The sharp surge toward film has pro- 
duced a controversy of no small pro- 
portions among advertiser and agency 
ranks. Heated debates on the topic are 
common across conference tables in the 
Madison-Park-Lexington-Avenue belt. 



A frequent line of argument runs 
something like this: If going into film 
production with their own capital is 
good enough for such top-rated adver- 
tisers as Procter &. Gamble, Lever 
Bros., R. J. Reynolds and DuPont, it's 
good enough for us to recommend simi- 
lar procedure to our clients. And, if 
the idea of repeating a certain number 
of film programs each season has been 
accepted by as shrewd an operator as 
General Foods, then it's solid enough 
to pitch to our clients for their con- 
sideration. 

The skeptics among the agency 
brethren counter this enthusiasm with 



19 



Over half of all network half-hour dramatic shows are on film las of mid -July 



ABC 

Lone Ranger (film) 

Beulah (film) 

The Erwins (film) 

Ellery Queen Alive) 

Date with Judy (live) 

Tales of Tomorrow (live) 

CBS 

Gene Autry (film) 

Lux Theatre (live) 

I Love Lucy (film) 

Our Miss Brooks film) 

Crime Syndicate (live) 

City Hospital (live) 

Suspense — - (live) 

Danger (live) 

The Hunter (film) 

Burns & Allen (film) 

Amos 'n' Andy (film) 

Big Town (film) 

Racket Squad (film) 

Mama (live) 

My Friend Irma (live) 

Schlitz Playhouse (film) 



Luigi _ (live) 

Police Story (live) 

Four Star Playhouse (film) 

NBC 

Hall of Fame (live) 

Sky King (film) 

Roy Rogers (film) 

Lights Out (live) 

Fireside Theatre (film) 

Circle Theatre (live) 

T-Men in Action __ (live) 

Dragnet (film) 

Gangbusters (film) 

The Doctor (film) 

Ford Theatre (film) 

* Martin Kane (live) 

* Big Story (live) 

Aldrich Family (live) 

One Man's Family (live) 

Shopping for network 

Cavalcade of America (film) 

Mr. and Mrs. North .__. (film) 



'Considering going film 



SUMMARY 



1 

i Network 

i 

ABC 


Film 

3 


___ n 

Live I 
i 

3 


CBS 


10 


9 



7 



Network 
not set 



Total 



2 



22 



o 



19 



the reminder that the rush to film still 
spells so much "blue sky": nobody 
knows yet, they say. what the economic 
pitfalls are of owning your own film. 
Some of these "aginners" argue furi- 
ously that live production has advan- 
tages film can never duplicate: others 
predict that there's bound to be a reac- 
tion from the rush to film which will 
prove not only bitterly disillusioning 
but quite costly. In other words, con- 
flicting viewpoints have created two 
camps whose viewpoints may be sum- 
marized as follows: one asks, why not 
anticipate the inevitable now. and the 
other, points the finger with alarm. 

I nlike the argument provoked by 
the swing to originating radio shows 
in Hollywood late in the *30"s. this con- 
troversy, while also involving Holly- 
wood, brings up economic issues of un- 
precedented complexity. In going film 
an advertiser is basically motivated by 
the urge to reduce his TV cost, whereas 
in the latter '30's he switched to Holly- 
wood for glamor and. beyond that, 
better ratings. The switch to film today 
is a question of capital investiment in 



programing with expectation of obtain- 
ing the final return on the investment 
through sales of the film product to 
other advertisers. It also involves the 
extension of the advertiser's periphery 
of operations into an alien field, name- 
ly, film producing. This kind of 
branching out is something he is not 
inclined to do in his own manufactur- 
ing operation I for example doing his 
oyvn lithography, making his own 
premiums I . 

Many sponsors with network inter- 
ests are faced with a dilemma. The 
question is — which is cheaper and 
easier for the advertiser — film or live? 

With a view to clarifying the prob- 
lem, sponsor polled the opinions of ad- 
vertisers, agency men. network execu- 
tives and film producing experts. Spe- 
cial cognizance was given in these in- 
terviews to the economic issues: (1) 
the kind of capital investment by ad- 
vertisers in film programs: (2) the 
theory and practical application of re- 
peat programs, or reruns; (3 I the vari- 
ous use formulas written into contracts 
for network film programs: and (4) 



the looming role of Hollywood unions 
in the rerun picture. 

Here's how the profx>nents of film 
shape their arguments: 

1. No better case for the acceptance 
of film by the viewer can be made than 
the fact that it took a film program, / 
Love Lucy, to get the top rating and 
establish a record in ratings for the 
medium during the past season. 

2. A quality film has an advantage 
in competing with a kinescope for 
prime time in a one or two-station mar- 
ket. Stations will take a print of the 
film yvhere they might have refused to 
clear time for a kine. 

3. Film offers the closest approach 
to perfection in production, and, be- 
cause it can be edited in advance, it 
minimizes the possibility of public re- 
lations problems — a safety factor of no 
mean value to many sponsors. 

4. Film has the great advantage of 
mobility over live; limiting the produc- 
tion to indoor scenes can make viewing 
monotonous. 

5. Economically, film is the adver- 

I Please turn to page 69) 



20 



SPONSOR 




Sponsors count on reruns 
to make film economical. Here's 
General Footls formula for number of 
"Our miss Brooks" reruns over three years 



Con- 
tract 
year 


No. 
new 
films 


Cost per 
new film 


No. 
repeat 
films 


Cost per 
repeat film 


Cost new and 
repeat films 


Average cost 
per use for 
39 weeks 


1st 


35 


$30,000 


4 


$14,000 


$7,706,000 


$28,360 


2nd 


28 


$33,000 


11 


$14,000 


$1,078,000 


$27,640 


3rd 


20 


$37,000 


19 


$14,000 


$1,006,000 


$25,795 



Theory of selling and buying film for network airing is based on the 
premise that cost per program is reduced by mixing new and repeat 
films during the course of a network sponsor's seasonal schedule. The 
formula in the "Our Miss Brooks" deal calls for gradual increase of the 
number of repeat shows each year, with individual cost of programs 
declining accordingly. Formula is from contract between GF and CBS. 



Blatz tried reruns for "Amos 'it' Andy," is 

now dropping policy. Ratings for reruns 

were good but dealers, vietvers protested 



MYS1 
KNfGI 



rating 

38 
36 
34 
32 
30 
28 















r\ 






















^M&& 


duc&X 


xepea 


y**, 


/XH&f 
















































































tvenfl 


'xzcttbi 

i 1 


Z&A0i 


'■"rfc£* 


&/_^S 



July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June 
1951 1952 

SOURCE: ARB, 1952 



From a rating and cost-per- 1 ,000 viewpoint the repeat policy of the 
"Amos 'n' Andy" film series proved gratifying to Blatz Beer. Though the 
rerun idea contained a sound economic base, the sponsor took into 
consideration some dealer objection and complaints against the practice 
(as reflected in about 1,000 letters received from viewers) and elected 
to discard the repeat practice altogether. New "A & A" policy is all 
new films on an alternate-week basis scheduled to run for two years. 




28 JULY 1952 



21 




A SPONSOR roundup 



I Stocks on the air 



Wall Streeters are turning to radio to 

broaden their market, teaeh people finanee basies 



There is a new merchandis- 
ing philosophy among the 
nation's salesmen of stocks and bonds. 
Just as free enterprise has brought the 
automobile within the budget of the 
common man. Wall Street is learning 
to expand its securities market to every- 
day Americans. In this broadening of 
the market, radio advertising has 
played a large role. 

The fact that brokers are using ra- 
dio at all in increasing numbers is in- 
dicative of how far the trend to mass 
selling has already come. Traditional- 
ly, their means of reaching the public 
was through word-of-mouth recommen- 
dation, personal solicitation and digni- 
fied small-space ads on the financial 



pages of newspapers. 

But since the war as many as two 
dozen brokers operating from Wall 
Street and points west have sought to 
broaden their clientele with radio ad- 
vertising. There has been scattered use 
of TV as well. 

Radio advertising for stocks and 
bonds has not departed radically from 
the conventional tone of broker adver- 
tising. Much of it is institutional and 
comes under the heading of public 
service. Sales pressure is kept low un- 
til the air salesman reaches the right 
psychological point for turning on the 
heat. 

Ira Haupt & Co. gave a good dem- 
onstration of the technique last year. 



The company bought two quarter hours 
a week over WHLI. Hempstead. L. I., 
for a show called News and Views. One 
program each week was devoted to an- 
nouncements about local club activities. 
The other permitted a local club mem- 
ber to give a talk over the air about 
his group. 

Ira Haupt kept its plug down to 
mentioning at the opening and close 
that the program was a public service 
by Ira Haupt & Co., investment bro- 
kers. But. in return for letting a speak- 
er use the air. each club agreed to per- 
mit an Ira Haupt representative time 
to speak at one of their meetings. 

Either Tony Reinach or Charles E. 
Bacon, partner in charge and manager, 



1951 Brookings Institution figures show broadening of securities market 



i (liKdiiiiiml lewis of adult share owners 

TOTAL POPULATION 



Share owners by income groups 




Last year of school 
completed 

8th grade or less 

I to 3 years high school 

4 years high school 

I to 3 years college 

4 or more years <ollege 

( ii mm students 

Total* _ _. 




Number 



19, 100.1)00 
19,440,000 

23,790,000 

8,820,000 

7,210,000 

720,000 

90,280.000 




CAWW WOMAN 



TOTAL INDIVIDUAL POPULATION 


Reported combined family 
income* 


Percent 


Numoer 


Members of families re- 
porting incomes of: 

I ess than $2,000 

S2,000 to S2.999 

}3,000 to S3.999 

$4,000 to $4,999 

$5,000 to 9,999 _._ 

SI 0,000 or more 


16.5 
15.7 
23.1 
17.6 
23.0 
4.1 
100.0 


26,660.000 
24,460,000 
35,900,000 
27,370.000 

■'.'. .820. 

6.310,000 


Total individuals 


155,520,000 



INDIVIDUAL SHAREHOLDERS 



WOFlSSIONAi 



Last year of school 
completed 


Percent 

im idem < 

in group 

pop. 


Est. no. in 
the group 


Percent 
distribution 


8th grade or less 

1 to 3 years high school 
1 years high school 
1 to 3 years college 
4 or more years college 


3.1 
3.2 

7.7 
15.1 
18.0 

2.8 

I..I 


1,230,000 

630,000 
1 .840,000 
1 ,330,000 
1 ,300,000 
20,000 
6,350,000 


19.4 
9.9 

29.0 

20.9 

20.5 

3 


1 01 ii" 


1 00.0 




flUSINCSSMAN 



INDIVIDUAL STOCKHOLDERS 






Percent 










Reported combined famii\ 


mi idem e 


Est. no. in 


Percent 


income* 


in group 
pop. 


the group 


distribution 


Members of families re- 








porting incomes of: 








1 ess than $2,000 _... 


I.I 


280,000 


4.3 


$2,000 to $2,999 


1.4 


:-.(). 


5.4 


S3.000 to $3,999 


1.6 


590,000 


9.1 


54,000 to $1,999 


3.0 


830,000 


12.8 


$5,000 to $9,999 


8.0 


2,880.000 


44.4 


$10,000 or more 


24.7 


1 ,560,000 


24.0 


Total individuals 


4.2 


6,490,000 


1 00.0 




FARMEU 




"Excludes 140,000 shareholders under 21 years of age. 



•Based on anticipated 1952 income before taxes, as reported 
b\ a representative family member, usually the head. 



W9Wtft 



22 



SPONSOR 




IK v ' ' 







"- e 






Stock talks attract prospects at lower cost than newspaper "tombstone" ads. 
Agencyman Ed Rooney (I.) timechecks Kidder, Peabody's Milt Martin. 



That air is potent medium for brokers was shown by Walter 
Tellier. He sold $300,000 in stocks but station cancelled 



respectively, of the mutual funds de- 
partment talked to the club about mu- 
tual funds. They also covered insur- 
ance, savings accounts, home buying, 
mortgages, government bonds. Book- 
lets were distributed and membership 
lists obtained. Mailings quickly deter- 
mined which of the members were 
"live" prospects and personal solicita- 
tion followed. 

It is tactics such as this which have 
brought new investors into the stock 
market. Ira Haupt & Co. had three 
salesmen in the mutual funds depart- 
ment in January 1950. sold a total of 
$1,241,000 in that year ( over $900,000 
of it during the last three months). 
Today there are 75 salesmen in the de- 
partment, with business running at the 
rate of $500,000 a month. 

The broadening of the market for 
stocks is clearly shown in a report re- 
leased a few weeks ago by the Brook- 
ings Institution. It revealed the total 
of share holders in the U. S. at the end 
of 1951 was 6,490,000. Of these, one- 
quarter — or more than 1,600,000 — 
made their investments within the past 
three years. Six percent — or nearly 
390.000 people — became shareholders 
in 1951 or acquired shares again that 
year. 

This broadening of participation in 
corporate activities is largely the result 
of three factors: (1) educational cam- 
paigns by brokers and the New York 
Stock Exchange; (2) efforts of the 
"blue chip" corporations to keep their 
slock priced within reach of the gen- 
eral public by means of stock splits 
whenever the market price exceeds 
$100; (3) the variety of mutual funds 
that have become available and which 
permit the "little guy" to get into the 

28 JULY 1952 



market via small, periodic investment. 
Though the customers are there to 
be sold, investment advertising has its 
obstacles. It is policed by at least three 
groups: the Securities Exchange Com- 
mission, the New York Stock Exchange 
and the National Association of Secur- 
ity Dealers. Although none of these 
agencies admits having power to "ap- 
prove" or "disapprove" advertising, 
each insists on seeing copy and quickly 
points out any discrepancies, cracks 
down on offenders in various ways. If 
the letter of SEC laws was followed, 
some feel there would be nothing but 
"tombstone" ads listing the name of 
the security, number of shares and the 
broker from whom a prospectus is 
available. 

Brokers, because of SEC restrictions, 
seldom plug individual stocks in print- 
ed or broadcast advertising. A class of 
investment such as common stocks or 
mutual funds, per se, will be explained 
but a particular stock or fund is not 
usually singled out, like a brand of 
cigarettes, and pitched as "less risky, 
more profit inducing, held by the most 
doctors, or recommended by men who 
know investments best." 

The air campaign recently staged by 
Kidder, Peabody & Co. through their 
agency Doremus & Co. illustrates the 
amount of care taken in investment ad- 
vertising. Says Ed Roonev, radio-TV 
director of the agency: "Those scripts 
had to be checked by the S.E.C., N.Y. 
S.E., our attorneys, the guest speaker, 
special counsel, and three or four com- 
pany executives." 

But the results showed it was worth 
il. The format of the show was to be a 
15-minute discussion between Milton 
Fox-Martin, manager of the mutual 



funds department of Kidder, Peabody, 
and the management head of a different 
mutual fund each week. WOR, New 
York, carried the show on Sunday 
mornings at 10:15. This time was 
picked so as not to interfere with the 
listeners' church habits or compete with 
TV or other Sunday activities. 

The program, entitled Your Money 
at Work, offered a booklet on mutual 
funds and a "confidential" Income 
Planning Guide which enabled Kidder, 
Peabody to recommend mutual fund 
investment programs designed to meet 
I Please turn to page 59) 




Hotv mutual 

funds broatlen market 

for securities 

During the past decade mutual fund 
assets have risen from $500,000,000 to 
more than $3,000,000,000. It is esti- 
mated that over a million people have 
entered the stock market via this 
route. Balanced investments within 
each fund gives stockholder feeling 
of security which is not possible when 
holdings are concentrated in only one 
or a few types of common stocks. 



23 



Advertisers learned plenty 

at the conventions 

Here are flaws and strongpoints in convention air selling as adnien see them 




over-ail 



24 



No members of the audi- 
ence were glued more close- 
ly to their TV and radio sets during 
the recent nominating conventions than 
men and women of the advertising fra- 
ternity — and for good reason. There 
were important lessons to he learned. 

Here was the biggest radio-TV sell- 
ing effort in the history of U. S. busi- 
ness and very little was available in the 
way of landmarks to guide advertising 
policy and tactics. 

Here was probably the biggest cu- 
mulative audience to see and hear any 
single radio-TV offering. 

Here were three large appliance man- 
ufacturers, and nobody else, spending 
more than 87 million for two weeks of 
advertising. (In addition, the three 
radio-TV networks went into the hole 
for about $3 million on the theory that 
it was their duty to present to the 
American people a key mechanism in 
the democratic process.) 

What was learned out of all this and 
what kind of selling job was done by 
the advertisers? To get some educated 
opinions, SPONSOR talked to a number 
of advertising people in the agency, 
network and electrical appliance field, 
including those directly concerned with 
the selling side of the convention pres- 
entation. 

Although opinions were far from 
unanimous, here is what the survey 
brought out: 

• The biggest headache is the spot- 
ting of commercials. The sponsors — 
vJtniral on ABC, Philco on NBC and 
Westinghouse on CBS and DuMont^ 
were well aware of their responsibili- 
ties in sponsoring a program of this 
type. They also knew how touchy a 
radio-TV audience can he about a 
commercial interruption at the wrong 

SPONSOR 




Most admen interviewed by SPONSOR 
liked Betty Furness sell for Westinghouse 



Both radio and TV gave audience close- 
ups with portable equipment like above 



Long debates caught sponsors with relatively too tew commercials. 
Interviews like this with Warren were used as programing fillers 



time. Despite this, there was enough 
criticism from those admen queried to 
indicate that the spotting problem was 
not completely solved, at least from 
their point of view as members of the 
audience. 

• In general those interviewed 
thought the radio and TV commercials 
were sound as far as selling principles 
go and workmanlike in detail. How- 
ever, in noting that the commercials 
were often similar to those used by the 
advertisers on their other programs, 
many admen voiced a vague dissatis- 
faction with the lack of "imagination" 
and "creativeness." Tailor-made com- 
mercials should have been used, many 
felt. 

• Most of those interviewed felt that 
there was not enough variety in the 
commercials, especially during the Re- 
publican conclave. It was pointed out 
by the sponsors, however, that they 
were prepared for only 30 hours of Re- 
publican programing and ended up 
with twice that much. Steps were taken 
to have a greater number of commer- 
cials on tap during the Democratic 
Convention. 

• The consensus was that the com- 
mercials were not too frequent or too 
long, although a minority disagreed, 
pointing to Westinghouse as a user of 
too much time. A Westinghouse spokes- 
man said that during the Republican 
Convention a total of 138 minutes of 
commercial TV time was consumed, 
which averages out to two and one- 
quarter minutes per hour — well under 
the norm. ( Philco gave their Republi- 
can Convention TV average as under 
one and one-half minutes per hour.) 

• Concerning Philco's relatively in- 
stitutional approach, the general atti- 
tude was this: an institutional type of 
commercial is effective when the sales 



situation calls for it, and Philco must 
have had good reasons for a low-key 
ad theme. However, there is no reason 
for an advertiser to feel that he must 
use this kind of commercial because he 
is sponsoring a public service type of 
program. The public is used to straight 
salesmanship. Furthermore, it was said, 
considering the amount of money 
spent, it would have been wasteful for 



an advertiser to buy convention spon- 
sorship and not unlimber the best sales 
artillery in his arsenal. 
• Most of the sources liked Beth 
Furness and her Westinghouse spiel, 
and agreed that by this time she is as 
well known as any of the candidates. 
A few said that since male interest in 
a political convention would normally 
(Please turn to page 63) 



tVlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ !l!lll!ll!l!l!i!!l!llll!lllll!!lllllllll!l!!!lllllll!lll!!!lil!llll!ll!!IIIIIH!ll!l!lli 



10 tips on convention air advertising 

Below are listed 10 conclusions drawn by four Democratic Party radio-T\ con 
sultants who monitored the Republican Convention 

Advertisers who use commercials of one minute or longer risk cut- 
ting into vital convention proceedings, annoying the audience 

' Appliance manufacturers do not make best convention sponsors 
because their sales pitches hare to be too long and complicated 

J Networks and political parties should get together and agree on the 
scheduling of commercials so they can be evenly spaced 

A Commercials should be eased into by introducing them with re- 
marks about what is happening on the floor of thr convention 

C Cartoon film commercials are a natural for convention sponsors 
because they offer chance to combine entertainment with pitch 

£ Exclusive sponsorship of conventions is of doubtful value and is 
not necessary in order to get effective sales coverage 

y Commercials should be varied as the audience can tire quickly of 
the same sales message and the face of the same pitchman 

O Network sponsors of national events need protection against local 
stations using station breaks to pack in commercials 

Q Visual identification of sponsorship can be overdone. When the 
product name appears everywhere, the viewer gets irritated 

10 Networks should sill the convention to sponsors fur limited high- 
spot coverage, rather than make a gavel-to-gavel commitment 



28 JULY 1952 




WFAA STARTED OUT IN TENT-ENCLOSED LIBRARY OF NEWSPAPER OFFICE, HAS GROWN TO 50 000-WATT POWERHOUSE. STATEMENT BY FOUNDl 

How WFM's Anniversary "Fair" boosted 

Product displays, newspaper ad lie-ins. made visitors to station's open lion* 



over-all 



Stations are becoming so 
merchandising - conscious 
nowadays that they even put advertis- 
ers in the spotlight when holding spe- 
cial celebrations to mark their own an- 
niversaries. When WFAA, Dallas, ob- 
served its 30th anniversary with a 
week-lonjj open house loi listeners 
(from 23 to 29 June), every sponsor 
on the station — network, local or na- 
tional spot was boosted in attractive 
displays; the corridors and studios of 
the station were literally turned into a 
-how room for \\ FA \ s clients. 



Gay 20's display intrigues (I. to r.) Martin 
Campbell, supervisor of WFAA radio and TV; 
Alax Keese, manager; Ted Dealey, pres., "Dallas 
News"; J. M. Moroney, "Dallas News" air v. p. 




The Radio Fair — as the event was 
called — attracted 30.320 visitors. The 
station reminded these listeners that 
sponsors were part and parcel of the 
hosting by: 

• The above-mentioned displays 

• Using sponsor-contributed products 
as prizes in three daily door prize 
drawings, plus big "jackpot" awards at 
the end of the week. 

• Supporting the event with an inten- 
sive newspaper advertising and public- 
ity campaign, mentioning the name and 
product of every advertiser who con- 
tributed to the door prizes in each ad 
run during the anniversary week. This 
meant that over 65 advertisers received 
daily credit in large newspaper ads in- 
viting the public to attend the open 
house and its festivities. 

In addition. WFAA had its air tal- 
ent, many of them linked with specific 
advertisers, personally meet the public 
by shaking hands in corridors, giving 
autographs and providing entertain- 
ment. 

That advertiser and agent \ reaction 
to WFAA's efforts on their behalf was 



26 



highly favorable can be seen by the 
several comments from admen which 
appear on page 28. 

The thinking behind the event and 
its advertiser-boosting emphasis is ex- 
plained by Martin B. Campbell, super- 
visor of WFAA and WFAA-TV, and 
Alex Keese, station manager. Campbell 
told SPONSOR: 

"Merchandising, properly handled 
and controlled, is in reality a sales tool 
for the station and the advertiser. It 
should be designed to accomplish some- 
thing for the advertiser — not treated as 
lagniappe. 

"You cant do merchandising with 
local firms and local sales people with- 
out advertising your station. 

"In merchandising, station salesmen 
are able to effect change of pace — do- 
ing something for the sponsor for a 
change. This creates the impression 
that \<>u are thinking and working for 
his business. It provides an entree into 
firms that you have not been able to 
break into before. Cood merchandis- 
ing as a job will get a lot of local peo- 
ple interested in what your station is 

SPONSOR 



OUTHWEST 

1922 





( IN 1922 (INSCRIPTION ABOVE) REMAINS ITS MOTTO 



its advertisers 



feel sponsors were hosts, too 



doing. It will move goods off the deal- 
ers' shelves and result in a lot of valu- 
able promotion for the station." 

Giving the "reason-why" for the cel- 
ebration, Keese said: "We wanted to 
give a party to honor the listeners who 
patronize our advertisers and have 
made possible our growth and develop- 
ment. Of course, our advertisers were 
lepresented; every single one of them 
— network, spot announcement or pro- 
gram — had an attractive display of 
their product or service." 

On-the-air promotion for Radio Fair 
started on 1 June, three weeks in ad- 
vance. During the air campaign, every 
WFAA personality extended a personal 
invitation to listeners to attend the cele- 
bration. Copy ran along these lines: 

"Next week, WFAA will be celebrat- 
ing its 30th anniversary. We're having 
open house up here for all our WFAA 
listeners . . . and I want to extend my 
personal invitation to each of you to 
slop by and visit with us. You'll meet 
your favorite WFAA stars . . . you'll 
see your favorite WFAA programs. 
(Please turn to page 63) 

28 JULY 1952 




Uncnitolltlf * S* ars ' man y °f them identified with sponsor shows, per- 
nUo|JllClll Ij . sonally greeted visitors, assured future listening loyalty 




Allt/lrfr Snho 1 Talent willingly gave autographs to all comers. Baritone 
HUlUvl dUllo* Johnny Nolton signed pictures for admiring females 



^Svyv-rw— wvjrr^r t mm >& A* '**" 


mwQW' ■ A 


^m*l xx J S ***«**\ 


TV 



r n X A ul aim mAn l a Stars like Reuben Bradford did their shows to big 
Lille! lull' llclll. visiting audiences. Entertainment was continuous 




Dm«A*i Housewives won products of sponsors when they entered award- 
llZvOa giving participation shows, or hit jackpot in daily door prize 

27 
For quotes from admen turn page 




SPONSORS GOT WALL DISPLAY TO REMIND VISITORS THEY MAKE STATION'S ENTERTAINMENT POSSIBLE. ABOVE, SPOT CLIENTS 

lfftneti ro in pi intent WFAA for pttttiny "elbow grease" into merchandising at celebration 



"On behalf of our client. Karl Hayes 
Chevrolet Company, Dallas, may we 
thank you for the excellent display of 
the firm's facilities during WFAA's 
30th anniversary celebration. 

"We feel the celebration afforded ex- 
cellent promotional possibilities for our 
client. As you know, advertisers are 
eager for the opportunity to display 
their wares to a vast number of peo- 
ple . . . especially at no cost! 

"Not only did your visitors meet and 
see many WFAA stars; they experi- 
enced a personal contact that tends to 
create a more faithful listening audi- 
ence, as the listener feels he 'knows' 
the personality. As we use WFAA to 
help sell Fail Hayes Chevrolet Com- 
pany, we are convinced that we now 
L'ct a more attentive ear for our sales 
messages since the listener has been 
exposed to the live personality. 

*" I he newspaper ads were also a 
help, and we've used the giveaway in 
which Farl Haves participated as an 
additional merchandising device for 
his product sen ice. 

"Thank you again for making possi- 
ble our participation in your celebra- 
tion. One visit to WFAA during cele- 
bration week was proof of its success." 

M. O. Rike, Jr. 

V.P and Manager 
Bozell & Jacobs 



"We were very pleased with the em- 
phasis WFAA put on merchandising at 
their 30th anniversary. WFAA has al- 
ways done a wonderful merchandising 
job, but the way in which you handled 
product identification, displays, give- 
aways, newspaper tie-ins and other pro- 
motional media was exceptionally good. 
On behalf of our client, the Ireland 
Chili Company, we want you to know 
how much we appreciate it." 

W. C. Woody. Jr. 

V.P., Radio & TV Advertising 
Grant Advertising 

"This promotion differed from the 
run-of-the-kilo job like a well-construct- 
ed building differs from a set of blue- 
prints. Media — particularly radio — 
often devise sound plans, wrap them 
in a beautiful package, and place them 
carefully on a shelf where they will not 
bother anybody. 

"Instead of paying lip-sen ice to the 
job of merchandising, WFAA took an 
Isold weather-beaten idea- open house — 
and shot the works around it. Their 
elbow-grease paid off. As long as there 
arc stations around with such vision, 
energy, determination, there'll be radio. 
"If all those obits are true, radio is 
having the doggonedest wake \ ou ever 
saw and it could go on forever." 

Robert H. Nash 

Account Executive 
Ira E. Dejernett 



"Your 30th anniversary celebration 
was tremendous. It proved the public's 
interest in radio is wide and intense. 

"From an angle man's tangent view- 
point, I was most amazed by the clever, 
artful inclusion and handling of your 
advertisers" products displays. The re- 
lating of each advertiser, his product 
and program in a vivid, dramatic, in- 
dividual display . . . the hearing and 
seeing of program broadcasts . . . how 
could anyone forget? 

"We are pleased to have had an ac- 
count participating in this jackpot bo- 
nus." 

James W. f. Randall 

Partner 

Randall-Perry 

" \ big pat on the back to WFAA for 
the big-time showmanship in connec- 
tion with its 30th anniversary. The 
thousands on thousands who came 
pouring into WFAA's studios, demand- 
ing to meet in person, for example. 
such personalities as Lynn Bigler, who 
i* the voice of Gladiola Flour, make a 
lot of pall-bearers for radio's highly: 
advertised funeral! What funeral? 

"It was a good — and perhaps much- 
needed — hypo for radio in these parts. 
The business community will have to 
believe that radio is a very live critter. 

Albert Couchman 

Owner 

Couchman Agency 



28 



SPONSOR 






• f • 




OKEY DOKEY" SMITH, NEW ORLEANS D.J., SYMBOLIZES PERSONAL SALESMANSHIP OF NEGRO-APPEAL RADIO 

The forgotten 15,000,0 
three years 

When sponsor first reported on Negro-appeal radio in its pioneering 10 October 1949 article 
"The forgotten 15,000,000," the development of this segment of American air advertis- 
ing was just beginning. Today, a recent sponsor survey showed more than 200 radio stations in 
all parts of the country are programing partially or entirely to the Negro radio listener, 
offering him everything from music and news to contests and community events that are 
tailored to Negro tastes. In fact, the Negro audience is now as recognizable a 
segment as, say, sports or classical music fans when it comes to measuring over-all U. S. 
listening. A gilt-edged list of leading advertisers are already aware that one 
of the best ways to reach this $15,000,000,000 market is via Negro-appeal radio. 
More are being added each week, sponsor has therefore reexamined this growing radio 
opportunity. This magazine is proud of its record as the first publication to spotlight Negro radio. 



28 JULY 1952 



29 



The to market: 




NEGRO AMERICANS PREFER TO BUY TOP-QUALITY CONSUMER PRODUCTS, EXPLODING MYTH OF A "SECOND-RATE" MARKET 



Q. Is there really such a thing as 
"the Negro market"? 

A. Yes, indeed. Despite the faet that 
Negroes eat the same food, hear the 
same radio shows, wear the same 
clothes and speak the same language as 
U. S. whites, the American Negro pop- 
ulation — now estimated at 15.000.0(1(1 
—can he considered a "market*" from 
several angles. 

Phis is how Joseph Wootton. head of 
the Interstate United Newspapers' ra- 
dio division and himself a Negro, put 
it to sponsor: 

"There are a few Negroes in this 
country, mostly in the upper income 
brackets, who trv to lose an) of their 
identification with the Negro group. 
They avoid reading the newspapers and 
magazines that appeal to the Negro 
audience; they don't li>tcii to stations 
that program for Negroes. They live, 
for the most part, like whites. 

"But. the great mass ol I . S. Ne- 
groes will continue as an 'identifiable 
group' for a long, long time to come. 
As long as there is racial segregation 



or racial prejudice in this country, Ne- 
groes will continue to turn to their own 
news and entertainment media tor 
everything from the interpretation ol 
new legislation to the enjoyment ol 
performing artists of their own race. 

"Naturally, all Negro parents hope 
that their children will have a better 
break in life and a better place in so- 
ciety than they did. But changes come 
slowly, when you're dealing with mil- 
lions of people. Advertisers must real- 
ize that an improved economic picture 
for the U. S. Negro market hasn't 
meant the decline of Negro-app:'al me- 
dia. With more money to spend. Ne- 
groes have tended to increase all ol 
their leisure-time activities, hut the rise 
has been sharper among activities and 
media that's slanted directh to Ne- 
groes. 

"Often, the Negro with an improved 
income is cautious. rel\ ing on the ad- 
vertising that's aimed squarely at him 
in his own media to help him decide 
how he's going to spend that monev. 
Generally, you can say that as long as 



there is a distinction between 'white" 
and non-white." there will be a Negro 
market." 



Q. What is the scope of the U. S. 
Negro market? 

A. Here, in highlight form, are the six 
key facts concerning "the forgotten 15 
million."" as gathered b\ SPONSOR: 

1. Population — The Negro popula- 
tion in the United States, some 99/^ 
of the "non-white"' Americans, now 
stands at close to 15.000.000 persons. 
This is a 16% increase from 1940 lev- 
els. At the same time, the number of 
white people in the U. S. increased, by 
comparison, some 14.5' v . In other 
words, about one out of 10 Americans 
today is a Negro, and as a race within 
the U. S. they arc increasing more rap- 
idlv than whites. 

2. Income — Although U. S. Negro 
income totals $15,000,000,000 annual- 
ly the median income of the individu- 
al Negro still doesn't match that of his 

{Please turn to page 72) 



30 



SPONSOR 



1. 



How has Negro population grown in the United States, 1940-1950? 



1940 



Negro population 12,866, 



000 



1950 



14,894,000 



% INCREASE 



SOURCE: Bureau of the Census, 1950 



75.8% 



One out of every 10 Americans is a Negro, and the per- 
centage of the total population that is Negro is increas- 
ing faster than the white. Contrast the figures at left 
with the percentage of increase of American whites, 
1940-1950, which stands at 14.4%. As a racial group 
Negroes represent a market as large as all of Canada. 



2, 



W hut was the increase in Negro urban population, 1940- 1950? 



1940 
1950 



6,253,588 



y- 



9,120,000 



INCREASE 

2,886,000 



A 



SOURCE- Bureau of the Census, 1 



Figures in the last U. S. Census revealed the startling 
changes that have taken place in the location of Negro 
population. The trend, due to steady migrations, has been 
away from rural areas and toward urban centers. Today, 
about six out of 10 Negroes live in urban areas, and about 
one out of three in cities of over 100,000 population. 
Migration trends have been away from the South. 



3. 



Is Negro income rising? 



1939-1949 MEDIAN INCOME 

INCREASE 



146% 



192% 



WHITE 



NEGRO 



Negro median income is 
still below that of U. S. 
whites, but the gap is 
now starting to close. 
As the figures at left 
show, the 10-year rise in 
income levels of Negro 
families has been notably 
faster than for whites, 
and the trend continues. 



SOURCE: Bureau of the Cen- 
sus, 1950 



ffoir tnang Negroes are etnplogetl? 







8.5 


( 


IVILIAN IAE 


OR 

r old. 

B '. 


FORCE 




4 - 


Mi EMPIQWD B 


MUttO 




— - 




85 




106 
















8.S 




_1.6 




SSfi 6 ' 6 \ 




OTA 


L 


MAU 


F 


EMAt 


E 


JRBA 


N RURAL 


RURAL 



In the past decade, Ne- 
gro employment has ris- 
en, and job opportunities 
for the Negro have 
broadened. As chart 
shows, nine out of 10 
Negroes in the civilian 
labor force (91.5%) are 
employed. Figure for white 
workers is about 95%. 

SOURCE: Bureau of the Cen- 
sus, 1950 



NOTE: Bar charts this page 
courtesy of Associated Pub- 
lishers Inc., representatives 
of leading Negro newspapers 



5. 



What are the top 24 markets bg Negro population? 



CITY 


POPULATION 


% OF CITY 
TOTAL 


CITY 


POPULATION 


% OF CITY 
TOTAL 


New York, N. Y. 


800,000 


9.8 


St. Louis. Missouri 


180,000 


13.3 


Chicago, Illinois 


420,000 


11.5 


New Orleans, Louisiana 


175,000 


30.1 


Detroit, Michigan 


350,000 


18.7 


San Francisco, Calif. 


170,000 


7.8 


Philadelphia, Penna. 


350,000 


16.2 


Houston, Texas 


160,000 


22.4 


Washington, D. C. 


280,000 


31.8 


Indianapolis, Indiana 


130.000 


13.2 


Greater Los Angeles 


220,000 


8.7 


Pittsburgh, Penna. 


119.000 


10.2 


Birmingham, Alabama 


205,000 


48.8 


Kansas Citr, Missouri 


118,000 


22.0 


Cleveland, Ohio 


195,000 


9.6 


Charlotte, North Carolina 


115,000 


35.0 


Memphis, Tennessee 


195,000 


16.3 


Cincinnati, Ohio 


115,000 


15.0 


Atlanta, Georgia 


190,000 


31.6 


Greater Durham, N. C. 


110,000 


38.0 


Greater Newark, N. J. 


190,000 


12.0 


Greater Wilmington, N. C. 


108.000 


31.0 


Baltimore, Maryland 


190,000 


19.3 


\ Greater Jacksonville. Fla. 


106,000 


35.2 



SOURCE: Bureau of the Census, 1950, other local sources, as prepared by Interstate United Newspapers, Inc. 



28 JULY 1952 



31 




ENTERTAINMENT: WLOU'S "LOUISVILLE LOU" AND KOWL'S "JOE ADAMS" D.J. SHOWS; WHAT'S "BREAKFAST AT CLUB ZEL-MAR," WGN 



Negro radio: 200-plus specialist 



Q. How many U. S. radio stations 
program directly to Negro audi- 
ences? 

A. It would seem that there'd be a 
simple numerical answer to such a 
question. But, it just isn't so. No one 
can state with complete accuracy the 
exact number of stations that are beam- 
ing programing, either as a specialty 
or as an occasional thing, at the Ne- 
gro, because of two factors: 

1. Rapid grotvth — Negro-appeal ra- 
dio programing has been in a boom 
period for the past five years. This 
boom has been confined to independent 
stations for the most part, and it is 
continuing in this direction. Many of 
them came on the air in the first post- 
war rush of new radio outlets, found 
that the going was pretty tough when 
they tried to use a "shotgun" program- 
ing approach, and then switched in 
whole <>r in part to Negro programing. 

This revamping of station program 
structures is still going on. With no 
network involved, it's hard to keep 
track of it on a market-by-market basis. 
However, the consensus of admen who 
arc media experts on the subject of the 
Negro market is that there are "from 
200 to 250" radio stations who spend 
all, or a good part, of their time pro- 
graming to Negroes. These stations 
cover at least 00', of the country's to- 



tal Negro population, and practically 
all of the urban Negroes. 

2. Extent of programing — Stations 
programing to Negroes often vary 
widely in the percentage of their total 
programing that is beamed to this 
market. This fact alone makes it hard 
to draw the dividing line between sta- 
tions that are Negro-appeal and those 
that are not. 

Some big stations, like Detroit's 
WJR for instance, might air one or 
two programs a week, with an intense- 
ly loyal Negro following. Most Negro- 
appeal outlets, such as New Orleans' 
WBOK, straddle the fence, devoting 
anything from 25% to 60% of their 
programing in this direction, with the 
rest aimed at such specialized white au- 
diences as language groups, hillbilly 
fans, or news listeners. A few stations, 
like Atlanta's WERD, are designed 
from the ground up to be almost 100^, 
\enro-appeal stations. 

Adding these two factors together — 
the increase in Negro-appeal stations, 
and the variations in the extent of the 
programing — causes a certain normal 
confusion. However, the firms that 
represent these stations, and the sta- 
tions themselves, are stepping up their 
research activities and the flow of mar- 
keting data. It won't be long before 
sponsors will know the complete story 



on just where Negro programing is be- 
ing aired, and how much. 



Q. What's the total potential au- 
dience among U. S. Negroes that 
can be reached by Negro-appeal 
spot radio? 

A. On the basis of average set satura- 
tions, measured against the total num- 
ber of Negro homes in areas serviced 
by stations known to do a sizable 
amount of Negro-appeal programing, 
these are the figures: 

Spot radio that's designed specifical- 
ly for Negroes and aired on stations 
that concentrate on this audience seg- 
ment is aiming at a total potential au- 



COMMUNITY SERVICE: COVERAGE OF LOCAL 



32 



For list of stations teith Negro programing see page 74 





"GENIAL GENE," WLOW'S D.J. REMOTE FROM RECORD SHOP, WPAL'S POETIC "IN THE GARDEN" TYPIFY POPULAR-APPEAL NEGRO AIR SHOWS 



stations-more coming 



dience of some 3,150,000 Negro homes, 
according to a sponsor estimate. 



Q. What are the facts of radio set 
ownership among Negro families? 

A. No nationwide set "census," in the 
style of the recent Joint Radio Net- 
work Committee count of U. S. sets, 
has ever been made exclusively in Ne- 
gro homes. Also, major independent 
research firms have not investigated 
this problem on a nationwide basis, al- 
though Pulse has checked listening 
among Negro families in many mar- 
kets. 

However, since Negro-appeal radio 



is primarily spot radio and bought on 
a market-by-market basis, many sta- 
tions programing to Negro ears have 
made their own studies of radio pene- 
tration in their own areas, and have re- 
ported to SPONSOR. 

Here is a cross-section of these stud- 
ies, giving the radio set picture in Ne- 
gro homes in cities located in both the 
North and the South, including large 
cities and small towns: 

New York City — According to 
WWRL, a station which has increased 
its Negro-appeal programing from six 
hours weekly in 1942 to a well-rated 44 
hours weekly today, set ownership 
among Negroes in the New York area 
is "above 98%, with many homes hav- 



ing more than one set." There are over 
1,000,000 Negroes in New York City. 

Washington, D. C. — The nation's 
capital has a high percentage of Ne- 
groes in its population, nearly 35% of 
a total population of about 1,500,000. 
A station with a sharp eye for mer- 
chandising and programing opportu- 
nities, WWDC estimates that there is 
"near-saturation" of radio in Washing- 
ton's Negro-family homes. 

Philadelphia — The Negro population 
of Philadelphia, like many a Northern 
city, has swung up sharply since 1940. 
A decade or so ago, Negroes accounted 
for about 8% of the population of the 
City of Brotherly Love. Today, that 
figure is nearly 12.5%, amounting to 
some 450,000 people. Radio satura- 
tion, as measured by WDAS, is "over 



94' 



in Negro families in this area. 



Charleston, S. C— WPAL, which 
started its independent Negro program- 
ing less than four years ago with a 
(Please turn to page 78) 



EVENTS, LIKE BLOOD DONATIONS, LODGE GROUP ACTIVITIES, CHRISTMAS AND RELIGIOUS OBSERVANCES HELP CEMENT NEGRO LOYALTIES 




Negro radio: 

you have to see 

il to understand it 



The spirit of youth and enthusiasm glowing in the pictures on these 
pages provides your best indication of what Negro radio is really 
all about. Like the dancers in the picture at right, it is just getting 
into swing. Three years ago when sponsor did its epochal article 
on Negro radio — The forgotten 15.000,000 — there were only a few 
stations with programing beamed at Negroes. Today's 200-plus 
such stations may turn out to be only the beginning. 

The picture of the jitterbugs is representative of more than just 
the youth of Negro radio. Il is actually a visual summation of all 
that makes this specialized branch of spot radio strong. The dancers 
are participating in a jive contest held weekly by WWCA. Gary, Ind. 
They are evidently enjoying themselves as are their onlooking 
friends. Thus the station has provided them with a healthful, com- 
munity-minded service — performing the dual role of showman and 
social servant. 

It is by such programing on two planes that Negro radio has gained 
li^tt ner loyalty known to few other specialized media. The teen-agers 
shown at right, as well as their grateful parents, are as responsive to 
the selling over Negro radio stations as they are to programing. 
They buy with enthusiasm — provided you keep your selling in har- 
mony with the entire operation. Let the same talent who have earned 
respect with their programs sell for you and you're making sales 
sense. Jar the atmosphere with some off-beat notes of canned selling 
and you've wasted an opportunity. 

As the pictures along the bottom of these pages plainly show, it 
isn't just youths who give Negro radio its vitality. The d.j. at lower 
left reading a request letter, the blues singer next to him giving it 
her all, the WERD newscaster interpreting news of interest to Negroes 
— all show you the kind of enthusiasm that goes to make up Negro 
radio in 1952. 




LOCAL JIVE CONTEST IS BROUGHT TO NEGRO 



NEGRO TALENT LIKE D.J. WALTER ANGLIN, SINGER ROSETTA THORPE AND DISKMEN MASSEY AND ALEXANDER ARE POWERFUL VOICES IN 





LISTENERS BY WWCA'S JESSE COOPWOOD, SEEN LEANING AGAINST PIANO. SUCH COVERAGE PAYS OFF FOR NEGRO-APPEAL OUTLETS 



1 THEIR COMMUNITIES AS ARE WERD'S ACE NEWS COMMENTATOR DR. WILLIAM BOYD AND D.J. PAT PATRICK; WJIV'S WHITE "JACK THE BELLBOY' 








-^tO. o*<- 







IT'S MORE BOUNCE 
TO THE OUNCE 

■i WITH ► 

AND IT'S MORE BO UNC E 
TO YOUR SALES 




STOCK O. K? 



ORDER TODAY! 



OFFICIAL ENTRY BLAN ( 



miss Sweet Peac 
Snuff for W52 



Kotou 



I. u.«»j itiicin .\«»l* til (ficir oini Style. Like most Negro d.j.'s, 
WWCA, Gary, Ind., performer above is most effective as salesman when 
he phrases own sales pitch from client's outline. Show is from store 



2. Take €idrantage of merchandising opportunities. Negrc 
appeal stations go all out to help as shown in WWRL, New York, mailing of autc 
graphed picture to dealers; WDIA, Memphis, card; WLOW, Norfolk, Va., contes 




to lopes: don't talk down 



Several years ago, one of the leading 
cigarette firms decided that a good way 
to boost sales was to aim a special ad- 
vertising campaign at Negroes. The 
tobacco company quickly mapped out 
its plans, nicked what it felt was a sure- 
fire selling angle, and charged ahead. 
Then, executives of the big firm sat 
back contentedly to await results. They 
never came. In fact, the whole cam- 
paign was viewed by the average Ne- 
gro smoker with the cold indifference 
reserved for a saloon keeper who has 
blundered into a temperance wienie 
roast. 

Ad\ertisin« men were soon called on 
the carpel by top brass, who loudly de- 
manded an explanation. Nobody had 
a good one. Finally, many months 
later, the cigarette firm learned why its 
well-meant campaign bad laid an egg. 

Instead of featuring its premium 
brand, the tobacco firm had chosen as 
its star performer in the Negro market 
its 10-cent brand. And, since the firm's 
admen had held the notion that the 
Negro was an impoverished, ignorant 



minority, the pitch had been a racially 
stereotyped one, centering on an ap- 
peal of "Get more for your money." 

Today, with Negro-appeal radio add- 
ing an ever-growing dimension to the 
means of selling to the Negro market, 
advertisers still fall into the same kind 
of blunders when they buy time on 
Negro-appeal outlets. They start off 
with a prejudiced concept of the Negro 
market, and then proceed to do them- 
selves more harm than good with a 
campaign that offends Negro listeners, 
or makes them feel that they are being 
ridiculed or talked down to. 

SPONSOR, realizing that selling to Ne- 
groes (or any other minority group) 
\ ia radio is a nicely-balanced blend of 
tact and good advertising tactics, has 
therefore prepared the following report 
covering many of the basic problems in 
this field. Information for it was gath- 
ered by SPONSOR editors in a nation- 
wide survey of stations who air Negro 
programs, as well as through discus- 
sions with media representatives, 
agencymen and several clients who 



have used Negro-appeal broadcast ad- 
vertising with success. 

A few readers may find some of the 
information that follows to be "old 
stuff" to them, having learned it the 
hard way by trial and error. But, for 
those advertisers who are eyeing the 
nation's $15,000,000,000 Negro mar- 
ket for the first time as a distinct eco- 
nomic unit, and who now realize that 
one of the best ways to reach and sell 
this market is through the use of Ne- 
gro-appeal radio, these tips could prove 
invaluable : 

-X- * » 

1. Negroes, despite lower-than-white 
income levels, prefer the best of brand- 
name merchandise and respond well to 
air advertising for such products. 

As Philadelphia's WHAT, an inde- 
pendent station that airs its program- 
ing exclusively for that city's 450,000 
Negroes, put it to sponsor: 

"Through experience, we have found 
that Negroes have a sensitive prefer- 
( rice for quality merchandise, and 
many of them will buy higher-priced 



36 



SPONSOR 




t. Tie into radio with your newspaper tuts. 

)!>achs furniture stores builds large-space ads in Negro press 
iround WLIB, New York, personality, Ruth Ellington James 



-f. Follow up at poittt'Of'Sale. Strong p-o-s follow-through is always good but makes 
more sense than u?ual with Negro radio where loyalty of audience to stations is unusually strong. 
Above, Negro magazine Ebony, a WBOK, New Orleans, advertiser, uses cards on magazine rack 



goods even if it means cutting down 
somewhere else." 

This is a hard fact for some advertis- 
ers to grasp, but to ignore this precept 
is to invite disaster. To use it proper- 
ly can bring results out of all propor- 
tion to expenditures. 

WLIB — a New York independent 
station that has managed to attract a 
huge and loyal Negro audience — ex- 
plains it this way: 

"The most important factor in ap- 
proaching the Negro through air ad- 
vertising is considering the Negro con- 
sumer a human being of dignity and 
self-respect — one who does not want to 
be talked down to, or catered to bla- 
tantly. 

"The Negro buys the best, whether 
it is clothes, automobiles, food, liquor, 
houses or furniture. High-priced sta- 
ples and luxuries are bought by Ne- 
groes in greater quantities than by any 
other comparable population group. 

"It is an accepted psychological fact 
that a minority people seek to attain 
more of the good things in life and 
articles of better quality than would 
ordinarily be expected of the general 
populace in comparable income levels. 
This understandable desire for recog- 
nition makes the Negro far more 



brand-conscious than tbe average con- 
sumer." 

These comments are typical of the 
advice Negro-appeal stations are quick 
to give new advertisers who feel that 
the Negro market is a golden oppor- 
tunity for second-rate or left-over 
brands. So many advertisers have 
made this mistake in the past that Ne- 
groes are today apt to become instantly 
suspicious, and close their purses ac- 
cordingly, to anything that sounds like 
an inferior buy. 

On the other hand, the advertiser 
who throws away his notions about 
Negroes "not being able to afford my 
best products" when he is deciding 
mhat he's going to sell is headed in 
the right direction. 

2. Negroes are proud and sensitive 
Americans, and can spot a chauvinistic 
advertising approach every time. 

In selling to Negroes on the air, one 
of the surest ways to bring the Negro 
sale of even the best brand of merchan- 
dise sliding downward instead of up- 
ward is to use an approach in commer- 
cials that is patronizing. 

Few advertisers, of course, would 
dream of being as obvious as the drug 
firm which once planned to advertise 
a hair product on Negro-appeal radio 
stations with a transcribed pitch of 



"Attention Negro women ! Now you 
can have hair that's just as attractive 
as that of white ladies!" (The stations 
to whom this campaign was offered re- 
fused it, knowing that Negro women 
would not only steer clear of the prod- 
uct, but of the station as well. ) 

However, many a well-meaning ad- 
vertiser who doesn't want to leave the 
selling up to the individual performers 
on Negro-appeal outlets and who in- 
sists on having agency written copy 
read verbatim on the air can make 
other and more subtle mistakes. 

As WDIA, Memphis, stated to SPON- 
SOR: 

"What sells a white person will sell 
the Negro listener in almost every in- 
stance. He needs and buys a home, 
food, clothing and little luxuries. He 
needs respect in the community, recrea- 
tion, a good job, just as white people 
do. Our commercial policy is never to 
high-pressure the Negro listener. They 
have been high-pressured too long. 

Attempts by advertisers to create a 
"friendly" commercial impression usu- 
ally turn out to be a resounding flop 
when a radio client goes off the deep 
end in trying overly hard to be a real 
pal to Negro listeners. Even if colored 
talent is being used, when the an- 
i Please turn to page 86) 



28 JULY 1952 



37 




lep results: 



From Memphis to Santa Monica, radio 
station operators have leaped at the 
opportunity to tell sponsor the story 
of advertisers, national and local, who 
have aimed their pitch at the Negro 
market with resounding success. The 
stations which have delivered the best 
results for sponsors are those which 
have most successfully integrated 
themselves with their communities. 

From the replies received to a 
SPONSOR questionnaire it is evident 
that the station managers, salesmen 
and disk jockeys of stations with Ne- 
gro programing are the greatest col- 
ection of "joiners" in the country. It 
is not unusual to find station person- 
alities who belong to as many as 40 
clubs. 

The sales results of sponsors who 
use these personalities to plug their 
products attest to the soundness of this 
philosophy of boundless associations. 
In each case listed below, the air sell- 
ing was done by a station personality 
whose recommendations have a high 
degree of acceptance in his locale. 
Some of the outstanding performers 
are pictured elsewhere in this section, 
but here are some examples of the 
effectiveness of their work: 



WDiA, Memphis 

Washing machines — When the Gen- 
eral Home Service Co. opened its doors 
in 1949. it received a co-op appropria- 
tion from the Memphis branch of the 
General Electric Sales Corp. A 13- 
week test was scheduled using a quar- 
ter-hour participation on one of the 
WDIA Negro disk jockey shows. At 
the end of this period the store added 
no sales of the item. A total of 546 



ftcuiofc shots build store traffic 

WHOM, Homestead, Pa., keeps star attrac- 
tion Mary Dee busy making personal pitches 

New product he is plugging is explained to 
clerk by WWDC's Jon Massey in D.C. market 

In Gary, Ind., d.j. Jesse Coopwood does a 
weekly show from market, adds zing to plugs 

Thorn McAn shoes "sell like crazy" when Wins- 
ton-Salem's WAAA sends its ace to stores 



SPONSOR 



rich yield for all types of clients 



washers had been sold — more than any 
other dealer had disposed of and al- 
most as many as all the G.E. dealers in 
Memphis together had sold. This ac- 
count has never been off the station 
since and in certain seasons has in- 
creased its amount of time on the air 
from five to 10 or 12 quarter-hours 
weekly. 

Patent medicine — Calotabs went 
about its test with exactitude. An ex- 
act stock count of both 15f* and 25tf 
sizes was made in eight of Memphis' 
volume drug stores (seven independ- 
ent, one chain ) , all having a high per- 
centage of Negro business. A second 
stock check was made two weeks later, 
one day before the air campaign. 

Four announcements a day were 
used, Monday through Saturday, and 
to make the test even tougher the ad- 
vertiser used e.t.'s rather than the live 
voices of WDIA personalities. 

Seven weeks after the announcement 
schedule began, the same eight stores 
were checked and sales recorded for 
the two-week period just past. Results 
were: Dollar volume increase for both 
sizes of Calotabs was 571%; 383% for 
the 150 size and 906% for the 25tf size. 
The sponsor snapped up a 52-week 
renewal. 

WERD, Atlanta, lia. 

Margarine — Quickly noting that Nu- 
coa margarine had started an an- 
nouncement campaign over WERD, 
Danneman's Supermarket decided to 
tie in with an announcement of their 
own, offering the product at a bargain 
price. On the following day, after one 
announcement, the store reported sales 
of over 3,000 pounds of margarine. 

Auto tires — After Prior Tire Com- 
pany started a saturation announce- 
ment schedule, one of its salesmen re- 
ported that his sales alone were up by 
$5,000 or more per week. 

Barbecued chicken — Ben Reid. a lo- 
cal cafe owner, told the station that he 
sold approximately 300 barbecued 
chicken dinners as the result of one an- 
nouncement on WERD. 

WL1B, JSew York City 

TV sales leads — Over 500 replies 
were received in response to an offer 
(Please turn to page 84) 

28 JULY 1952 



National advertisers using Negro radio 


APPLIANCES 


Ballard & Ballard 


Black Draught 


Admiral 


Best Foods 


Calotabs 


Easy Washer 


Borden 


Charles Antell Formula 


General Electric 


Calumet (baking pow- 


JSo. 9 


Hot point 


der) 


Chlorodent 


Maytag 


Carnation (milk) 


Clorets 


l\orge 


Carolina (rice) 


Colgate (dental cream) 


Philco 


Cloverleaf (dry milk) 


Dr. Pierce's Favorite 


RCA 


Dad's (root beer) 


Prescription 


Singer 


Diamond (tissues & 


Dr. Pierce's Golden 


AUTO SUPPLIES 


wax paper) 
Durkee's 


Medical Discovery 
Ex-Lax 


Goodyear 


Fab 


Fath"r John's (medi- 




Florida Citrus Fruits 


cine) 
Feenamint 


BAKERIES 


Folger's (coffee) 


Continental Baking 


General Foods 


Formula X 


Purity Bakeries 


General Mills 


Gem Blades 


Ward Baking 


Gold Medal (flour) 


Grove [laboratories 


BEER & WINES 


Griffin (shoe polish) 


Hadacol 




Ideal (dog food) 


Miles Laboratories 


Atlantic 


Kellogg 


Murine 


Ballantine. 


McCormick (spices) 


Musterole 


Blalz 


Maxwell House (coffee) 


Nervine 


Champagne Velvet 

Cartings 

Griesedieck 

Jax 

Knickerbocker 


ISucoa (margarine) 


Pepto-Bismol 


Lipton's (tea) 
Pet (milk) 


Pepto-Magnin 
Pertussin 


Pur ex 


Roral Crown (hair 


Manischewitz (wine) 


Royal Hawaiian (tuna 


dressing) 


Miller High Life 


fish) 


Rybutol 


National Bohemian 


Shinola 


Scott's (emulsion) 


Red Top 


Silver Dust 


SSS Tonic 


Regal 


Standard Brands 


Stanback 


Stag 


Super Suds 


Sulfnr-8 


Twenty Grand 


Swansdown (flour) 


Sunkist Frozen Orange 


Virginia Dare (wine) 


Tarstee Bread 


Juice 


W etch's (wine) 


Tide 


W ildroot Creme Oil 




Wilson & Co. 


4-Way Cold Tablets 


APPAREL 




666 Cold Tablets 


Adam Hat 


INSURANCE 




Robert Hall 
Thorn McAn 


Service Life 


ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 


Universal Life 




GROCERS 




General Electric 


A & P 


DRUC PRODUCTS 


(lamps) 


Kroger 


Anacin 
Arrid 




CROCERY PRODUCTS 


FINANCE COMPANIES 


Armour 


Bayer Aspirin 


Family Finance Corp. 


Aunt Jemima 


B. C. Headache Remedy 


Seaboard Finance Corp. 



Personal delivery of prize wins aood w ; ll Mary Dee's personal appearance plugs Fort Pitt 




>.■■'.■'■". 



AUTOMOBILES 



SPONSOR: McCaa Chevrolet \CENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: This auto dealer in West 
Memphis, Ark., started with five one-minute participations 
daily to promote used car sales. Sales picked up percepti- 
bly. Then McCaa shifted to two announcements daily for 
two months at about $9 per announcement. During this 
period McCaa Chevrolet reported the sale of an average 
oj six cars a day directly attributable to the announce- 
ments: s 10,000 north oj used cars for a $000 expenditure. 



\\ Dl \. Memphis 



PROGRAM: Announcements 




results 



INSECTICIDE 



SPONSOR: Harris Chemical Corp. AGENCY: Marfree 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Harris Chemical introduced 
WGY listeners to their Fly-Han through participations on 
The Chanticleer, an early-morning program. The insec- 
ticide was offered to listeners on a mail order basis for 
$2.98. Results were immediate and for 13 weeks Harris 
averaged 455 orders weekly on an expenditure of $450 each 
week. Average sales tally for every $450 spent: $1,355.90. 



\\ • .> . Sclirjicc-l.-iih 



PROGRAM: The Chanticleer 



MENS HOSE 



SPONSOR: Joy Hosier Mills AGENCY: Maxwell Sackheim 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Over a three-month period, 
Joy Hosiery employed 30 participations on the Mrs. Page 
program on the Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday, 9:30 
to 9:45 a.m. shovjs. They offered five pairs of men's 
nylon hose for $2.98 plus C.O.D. and postage. The an- 
nouncements, costing $3,300. produced $11,210.66 in 
sales. This from 2.817 pieces of mail containing 3,762 
unit orders. The cost per order was 88(*. 

WJR, Detroit PROGRAM: Mrs. Page 



CATTLE 



SPONSOR: Meadowbrook Farms AGENCY: Gilbert Sandler 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: On his first venture into ra- 
dio J. C. Lewis, Meadowbrook Farms owner, contracted 
for a series of 13 five-minute stockyard reports scheduled 
at noon. After the first program, which contained two 
100-word commercials. Lends sold 10 heifers and one 
bull. For Lewis that meant a sale of $7,000 worth of 
cattle at a total cost of five minutes of station time, or 
less than $75. 



WBAL. Baltimore 



PROGRAM: Stock Yard Reports 



STRAWBERRIES 



SPONSOR: Tradewell Stores AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Tradewell Stores had to 
move 800 cases of fresh strawberries before they spoiled. 
They scheduled 15 run-of-the-air announcements for a 
Tuesday afternoon, evening, and all day Wednesday. By 
Wednesday morning, however, remaining announcements 
were cancelled. Eleven, announcements for $63.14 sold all 
800 cases of strawberries. 



KRSC. Seattle 



PROGRAM: Announcements 



DOUGHNUTS 



PORTRAIT STUDIO 



SPONSOR: Donut Bar 



\(.E\(A : Direct 



• M'SULE CASE HISTORY: The sponsor used air copy 
based on The Dunkers Handbook, published by the 
Downyflake Doughnut Company. Three one-minute an- 
nouncemenls during u single baseball game was the 
starter. After these three commercials, Donut liar re- 
ported sales of 171 dozen doughnuts or over $90 worth 
at an advertising cost of $7.50 — a radio-spurred sale of 
2,052 doughnuts. 



KRXL, Roseburg, Ore. 



PROGRAM: Announcements 



SPONSOR: Varden Studio AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: This local studio sought to 
attract customers with disk jockey Beechcr Frank and 
folk singer Jimmie Osborne. Commercials were integrated 
in a daily five-minute show. After 12 shows, Varden 
pulled 1.350 inquiries from interested potential customers. 
Cost-per -inquiry amounted to 12.6 cents for the 60 min- 
utes of air time. Two-week cost: $171 — to build up a sales 
potential of several thousand dollars. 

WKLO, Louisville PROGRAM: Beecher Frank-Jimmie Osborne 



Topeka's Biggest 
Building Boom On, 
Valued 45 Mijjjp^t> 




E. LEWIS 



. building tx\ 
'd Saturday 
dw the city's 

start before t\ 
alm\ 

sldential Th\ 
Numix-r more 
of units [gram 
"»8 7? n ' ch 



^) 



\0$ 



4s 







Y 



NEW BELL TELEPHONE BUILDING 



MIGHTY 



NEW CARLINCHOUSE BLDC. 



HUSKY MARKET 

Perhaps you've read about Topeka's rapid increase in 
retail sales -- the nation's leader in increase for many 
weeks running, in fact. Perhaps you know too that big 
and reliable industries give Topeka one of the highest 
employment ratings in the nation. You may also know 
about the record wheat crop we're enjoying .... or 
the record 45-million dollar construction program just 
underway. Knowing these facts, you may need one 
more for your fall-buying file: Topeka's trade territory 
population of nearly 500,000 is sold on WREN. 



* More Listeners.. More Hours.. Than Any Other Station in Topeka 

*ASK US FOR ANY RECOCNZIED SURVEY OF THE LAST 4 YEARS 



5,000 Watts 




ABC 



GET THE FACTS FROM YOUR 
WEED & COMPANY REPRESENTATIVE 



r 





Why is it worthwhile for a national advertiser to 
plan a special radio campaign geared to the Negro 
market? 



Charles D. Kasher 



President 

Charles Antell, Incorporated 

Baltimore, Maryland 




Mr. Ferguson 



The 

picked panel 
answers 
Mr. Kasher 

Because a smart 
national advertis- 
er could very 
conceivably get 
20% of his sales 
volume from the 
10' < Negro pop- 
ulation of the 
United States. 
And. he should 
get it at a lower- 
cosl-per-1.000, 
making it produce even more than 
20' i of his net profit. Sound like a 
pipe dream? There are more than 
15,000,000 Negroes in America. Geo- 
graphically they can be located, fre- 
quently making up half the population 
of a city. They are a sincere, respon- 
sive radio audience. They are a vivaci- 
ous, fun-loving, warm-hearted people 
and they love to be entertained. In 
this part of the country, radio, beyond 
the shadow of a doubt, is the only me- 
dium that penetrates the suburb and 
subdivision, the town and farm, and 
goes through educational, racial and 
-<><ial barriers to reach the mass of the 

\c;jl n people. 

To a great degree, their speech is 
idiomatic to the extent that nobody 
sells a Negro like another Negro ivho 
knows how l<> sell. For long term re- 
sults an advertiser should invest his 
monej in a Negro personality of prov- 
en ability. Many sales messages in- 
tended f<>r the cars of the Negro have 
fallen far short of their goal. Rut. 
once that sales message i- phrased in 
liis kind of talk and voiced by a friend 



of his in whom he has confidence and 
pride, he'll buy more quickly and he'll 
buy more. 

They are an intensely proud and 
loyal people. To a degree, they buy 
what our WDIA personalities sell be- 
cause they are proud of them as sym- 
bols of progress. They are eager to co- 
operate with them for the good of all 
Negroes. 

What of that remark about lower 
cost-per-1.000? In a station like ours 
you have one of America's most effi- 
cient advertising tools. A good Negro- 
audience station puts your message 
directly into the ears of the people you 
are trying to convince with very little 
seeding of barren ground. And even 
when a station has a considerable 
white audience as well, as ours has. 
this bonus is a part of the market on 
which advertisers have long depended 
for sales. 

From their cold, aloof ivory towers, 
some advertising men have been striv- 
ing desperately to dream up the one 
idea that might squeeze the last drop 
of blood from an already mutilated 
white turnip. And yet, within his 
grasp, hangs plump and juicy, the suc- 
culent plum of a $15,000,000,000 Ne- 
gro market. 

The sooner he wakes up and reaches 
i ut for this plum, the sooner he ma\ 
join the ranks of those -cores of na- 
tional advertisers who are already 
quietly going about the business of 
making money, hoping fervently that 
not too much of the competition will 
catch up on to the fact that here, liter- 
ally, is the -ales opportunity of the 
decade. 

Bert Ferguson 
Manager 
WDIA 
Memphis 




Miss Allison 



After all the en- 
thusiastic articles 
and impressive 
statistics with 
which advertisers 
and agencies have 
been barraged, I 
doubt whether 
a n y o n e today 
questions the val- 
ue of the Negro 
market. Our ex- 
perience certain- 
ly proves it. Through many years of 
advertising package goods products to 
the "'general" market, we have never 
seen results such as have been achieved 
in a relatively short time in the Negro 
market — results far beyond the opti- 
mistic predictions in those articles and 
statistics. 

However, if the campaign to the Ne- 
gro market is to be truly worthwhile 
it must be really "special." We have 
found that it is impossible to produce 
an amazingly high volume of sales at 
a dramatically low advertising cost. 
But only by applying special effort 
along special lines. 

The timebuyer approaching the Ne- 
gro market often does not have the 
well developed yardsticks and working 
tools which serve so effectively in the 
general market. The three R's — rcp>. 
rate cards and ratings — which are so 
important to the timebuyer's other ac- 
tivities are too often lacking here. And 
so, special knowledge must be devel- 
oped painstakingly and special pro- 
cedure- must be improvised for mak- 
ing subtle decisions which often can 
mean the difference between sensation- 
al success and discouraging failure. 

Copy. too. must be different. You 
can't always use the cute jingle or 
minute transcription which has done 



42 



SPONSOR 



so well on the larger, general market 
stations. In fact you can't always use 
the same copy in all parts of the coun- 
try, nor equally well on gospel and 
jive programs. 

Our actual experience has proved 
beyond question that the Negro market 
is definitely worthwhile — responsive, 
loyal and very profitable. But only if, 
of course, it is approached in a "spe- 
cial" way. 

Madeleine Allison 
Media Director 
Herschel Z. Deutsch 
New York 



\\ bile some as- 
t u t e advertisers 
have discovered 
the Negro mar- 
ket, the bulk of 
national advertis- 

X ^H H first national ad- 
f ^H vertiser in any 

' ^| particular indus- 

Mr. Donneson try that beams 

specific advertis- 
ing to the Negro market immediately 
gains the undivided product loyalty of 
large segments of this market. 

The cost-per-1,000 listeners is usu- 
alh many times less than on the larger 
radio stations. Negro-audience pro- 
grams are usually found on smaller in- 
dependents ranging in size from 250 
watts to 5.000 watts, but all with sig- 
nals that come into the Negro commu- 
nities like a ton of bricks. However, 
iheir rates are low enough to make the 
cost-per-1,000 very low.— At WWRL 
the cost-per-1,000 on Negro audience 
shows is as low as 11#. Very few me- 
dia can deliver at such low cost. 

Negro people do listen to Negro 
audience shows all over the country. 
A study made by Pulse in New York 
two months ago. showed that more 
Negro people in greater New \ ork 
(Negro pop.: 1,001,3711 listened to 
5.000-watt WWRL than any other ra- 
dio station, network or independent. 
This is typical of listener studies made 
b\ unbiased rating organizations in a 
dozen or more Negro markets. 

The Negro market i- large enough 
ti' require special attention. Most ad- 
vertisers in planning a national cam- 
paign would not omit cities like Boston 
(pop. 801,000) St. Louis (pop. 856,- 
000 1 or Pittsburgh I pop. 676.000). 
Yet in the New York area alone there 
[Please turn to page 49) 



28 JULY 1952 




Slorer Broodcosfing Company 



ZIV's NEW ELECTION YEAR SHOW THAT 



i 







CAPTURING THE DRAMA THE WRIT, AND THE 



^SXCMEMiNrW THE U.S. SENATE AT WORK! 






"S4* 



'&?4& 




a great 
public service! 




■5— .—i.i— " ,J aa 



rir 



/n //o/> Foreman 



A- 



lS the tall roster of shows went 
off the air. some amazement was 
registered at the fact that the sit- 
uation comedy type of program 
had climbed to a position of domi- 
nance. Exemplified by / Love 
Lucy, which is way out front in 
anybody's rating system, shows of 
this type ended up leaps and 
bounds ( or should I say sprocket- 
holes ) ahead of, say Mr. Berle 
who. according to A.R.B.. just 
made the first 10. 

My Friend Irma had also clo-ed 
fast and looks like it will lie in the 
money for a Ions: while next sea- 
son, too. The only amazing thing 
to me is. why the amazement? 



The human embryo passes 
through the entire history of man's 
development and television, too. is 
doing just that — almost before be- 
ing born. So there should be little, 
if any, wonderment at what is hap- 
pening right now. For example, 
look back a scant five years, and 
you'll recall, I'm sure, how the 
soothsayers were stating flatly that 
TV was only for plav-by-pla\ 
sports broadcasting. (Remember 
when they said that about radio?) 

Then the boys with the ouija 
boards went on record stating that 
you needed an hour-long program 
to get impact out of the new me- 
dium. (Radio look 20 vears to 



Ben Duffy on film show reruns 

As a follow-uu to Bob Foreman's comments on reruns in the 14 
July issue, here's a viewpoint from Ben Duffy, president. BBDO: 

1. // the public is expected to buy a product as a result of advertising, 
it is important that nothing be done to discredit the product or company 
making the product. It should always be "in character?' A rerun or 
second showing would rewh some new jieople, but those who viewed it 
before may get upset and this would reflect on their attitude towards 
the client's product. Why go looking for trouble by being "penny wise 
and pound foolish?'' 

2. Experience has indicated that reruns can secure an audience, but 
research on the effect of reruns on the TV public 'those who have viewed 
before) is lacking. Not audience measurement, but audience attitude. 

3. Reruns are okay at certain times under certain conditions (summer 
replacements, etc.) but at the height of the season, lor high ranking, 
high cost shows in fee) time spots and sponsored by top ranking adver- 
tisers, they are out of place. 

I. The quoted costs for second showings for many shows are too high. 
•>. A lot depends upon the type of sponsor. For example, advertisers 
with set e<ted dealers selling high priced products may be criticized In 
the dealers for "palming of]'' second showings. 

ft. ) ou can get away with second showings on children. Perhaps here it 
is an advantage because children like to anticipate what is going to 
happen. (Hopalong Cassidj is a good example.) Further, you can get 
aica\ with second showings in non-competitive time spots better than 
you can in the competitive time periods. "The show's the thing." A 
person may read a good book twice instead of reading a poor book. Hut 
if you had the selection of two good books on your reading tabic, you 
iiou/d be more likeh to read them both than to read one twice. 



live down that fallacy; remem- 
ber?) 

Next came the swamis with tow- 
els on their heads, and these gave 
forth the revelation that no one 
could possibly watch daytime tele- 
vision because the housewives of 
America wouldn't have time with 
all their dusting and diapering 
chores. ( Once they had also said 
there was no market for daytime 
radio because women were too 
busy!) 

And now we find that the loose- 
ly formated, 60-minute TV vari- 
ety show has burned up more acres 
of gags and comics than are avail- 
dble, so each week there is consid- 
erable fizzling and sputtering, and 
shows of this type have more and 
more trouble getting off the 
ground. Then, at this crucial mo- 
ment, in waltzes the first really 
lunnv situation comedy (unfortu- 
nately, the Erwins and Beulah 
missed). The newcomer was half 
an hour in length, a barrel of fun. 
(Please turn to page 48) 

commercial reviews 



(See also Conventions story page 24) 

TELEVISION 



SPONSOR : 

agency: 

PROGRAM : 



Westinghouse 
McCann-Erickson, N. Y. 
Republican Convention 



The Westinghouse commercial format 
of the Republican Convention, at least for 
the first two days of the extravaganza, was, 
I'd say, a model of restraint, good taste, 
and held to a minimum of intrusion. Hav- 
ing transported the first lady of commer- 
cialdom, Betty Furness, to Chicago, the 
advertiser offered copy that was informa- 
tive, interesting and well presented. The 
first glimps; I caught of Miss Furness (I 
think it was her premiere — on the dav he- 
fore the circus began) she explained, by 
way of preface and apology, that she would 
br;ak in from time to time during the 
proceedings to tell us about Westinghouse 
?nd its products. Tactfully she pointed 
out that her remarks would never obscure 
any important convention news, and she 
showed how a buzzer would interrupt her 
(Please turn to page 56) 



46 



SPONSOR 



T. V. story board 

A column sponsored by one of the lending film producers in television 

S \ I { 1 1 A 



NEW YORK: 200 EAST 56TH STREET 
CHICAGO: 16 EAST ONTARIO STREET 




How to present a new product to TV viewers is ably illustrated 
in a series of program commercials for Finesse — the new cream 
shampoo of Jules Montenier, Inc. For this highly competitive mar- 
ket, these SARRA-produced messages sell — and sell hard- — on the 
product's colloidal cleansing, utilizing live action and illustrative 
animation sequences. As an added note, Dr. Jules Montenier himsell 
appears in the SARRA VIDE-O-RIGINAL commercials. Earle 
Ludgin & Company is the agency. 

SARRA, Inc. 

New York: 200 East 56th Street 

Chicago: 16 East Ontario Street 




In an aura of dignity, introduced by the distinctive twin medallions 
to mark its 60th anniversary, Philco showed its entire line of prod- 
ucts to the TV audience in a commercial opening produced by 
Sarra especially for presentation of the Republican and Democratic 
national conventions. The quality of reproduction and reception 
is another evidence of the excellence of the SARRA VIDE-O- 
RIGINAL print. Produced for the Philco Corporation through the 
Hutchins Advertising Co., Inc. 

SARRA, Inc. 

New York: 200 East 56th Street 

Chicago: 16 East Ontario Street 




This sprightly group of TV commercials produced by SARRA for 
Lone Star Beer bounce right into viewers' consciousness and hold 
their attention from jingle introduction through a series of product- 
enjoyment action scenes interpolated with appetite-appealing still- 
lifes to the ending jingle fadeout. The sparkle of Lone Star Beer 
is shown to best advantage in the crystal-clarity of the SARRA 
VIDE-O-RIGINAL prints. Made for the Lone Star Brewing Com- 
pany under the supervision of Thomas F. Conroy, Inc. 

SARRA, Inc. 

New York: 200 East 56th Street 
Chicago: 16 East Ontario Street 



28 JULY 1952 



47 



#* &!. 




soles increase 
PERMA STARCH' 



A. Earle Clark, food broker, has found that wvTwtf television 
has brought him sales increases up to 400"/, ... this from the 
825,(100 year 'round residents who spend over one billion 
dollars annually in the great south Florida market. 

Learn more about this amazing WTVJ sales story ! 
CALL YOUR FREE & PETERS' COLONEL TODAY! 



*?fottdad 'pCiaC' TV StatC&t 

L -mw 



CHANNEL 4 



MIAMI 



48 



COMMERCIAL REVIEWS 

(Continued from page 46) 

and presented two different, yet 
sympathetic people. What hap- 
pens? We're amazed that it wins 
friends and influences rating ser- 
vices. But why? 

Since Lucy's success, it's safe to 
assume that scores of other situa- 
tion shows are already underway, 
both live and on film. Some have 
already been aired as summer re- 
placements. Others are in the cut- 
ting rooms being processed into pi- 
lot films, and still others are onlv 
in typewritten form, bound with 
equal parts of Bristol board and 
hope. 

One of the smartest ways to de- 
velop shows of this type and of the 
right caliber has been devised by 
several producers who are current- 
ly engaged in the making of tele- 
vision films. These outfits are now 
in production with a series of un- 
related dramatic programs, which 
are already spoken for by sponsors 
either on a network or as local 
buys. In each 13 of the series, the 
producers expend a little extra 
money and a lot of extra effort 
trying to come up with a plot or a 
cast or a combination of both 
which looks like it would be a good 
bet expanded into a series on its 
own. This singleton film paid for 
by the original sponsor (and run 
by him or by "them" if it is syn- 
dicated) becomes the pilot film 
from which the contemplated sit- 
uation series is peddled. I know 
of one case in which this technique 
has already worked and another 
near-miss. 

Whatever does emerge next 
year, it is obvious that more and 
more situation comedies will find 
their way onto rosters of networks, 
local stations, and advertisers next 
fall . . . for the simple reason that 
such ventures are pleasant to view, 
comparatively low in cost (up 
against the hour variety show, that 
is) and far easier to put together 
from a scripting, casting, and pro- 
duction standpoint. 

A good thing, I'd say, for audi- 
ences and advertisers alike! 

SPONSOR 



MR. SPONSOR ASKS 

[Continued from page 43) 

are more Negro people than the entire 
population of any of these three cities. 

A national advertiser will receive a 
great deal of extra merchandising be- 
cause these stations are anxious to 
make the campaign a success. At 
WWRL we set up product displays in 
supermarkets; send out many promo- 
tion pieces to grocers, druggists; call 
on wholesalers; attend company sales 
meetings; continually advertise and 
promote shows through newspapers, 
posters, etc. 

Breads, rice, sugar, flour, canned 
milk, canned meats, coffee are more in 
daily demand than luxury type foods. 
Any advertiser in each of the above 
industries that beams ads to the Negro 
market will gain thousands of regular 
customers who buy this type of product. 

However, when money is available 
Negro people will buy the best quality 
product regardless of price. With more 
people working today than ever be- 
fore, the Negro market is ready for 
higher priced items in all food and 
drug, as well as soft and hard goods 
lines. One supermarket chain sells 
more quality cuts of steaks in low in- 
come Bedford-Stuyvesant in Brooklyn 
I predominantly Negro I than in their 
high income, predominantly white 
Manhasset, L. I., supermarkets. 

A national advertiser will be reach- 
ing domestic workers who not only buy 
for their own family, but in many in- 
stances for the family they work for. 

Selvin Donneson 
Sales Manager 
WWRL 
New York 

When a nation- 
al advertiser 
knows that he has 
substantial dis- 
tribution in a Ne- 
gro market he 
shouldn't be con- 
tent to sit back. 
Instead he should 
do something spe- 
cific to keep up 
with competition 
through the utilization of special cam- 
paigns rather than a general campaign. 
If, for example, the product up for 
promotion, is food the advertiser knows 
the Negro population represents a sub- 
stantial percentage of the total popu- 




Mr. Wootton 



lation. He then has some idea of the 
potential dollar volume they represent. 

Since the per capita spendable Ne- 
gio consumer dollar, for food, esti- 
mated at 27.9 cents, approximates the 
national average, the interested nation- 
al food advertiser's targets can be pin- 
pointed, market-by market, just so long 
as they have information which fully 
establishes such a potential. 

These advertisers must be willing to 
grapple with the definition of "mar- 
kets," generally, and the so-called Ne- 
gro market, in particular. They must 
establish the market ratio between 
white and non-whites, and be gov- 
erned accordingly. 

This is one of the measurements de- 
vised to provide the evidence of Negro 
market worth, as related to any con- 
templated over-all campaign. 

Many so-called "sure fire" national 
radio campaigns actually promote 
"discrimination," against the advertis- 
er's own dealerships. Dealerships whose 
investments in property, by grace of 
location, happens to be, in what, some 
uninformed advertisers and/or their 
agencies prefer to call "C" and "D" 
markets. 

One of several possible formulae for 
some national advertisers designed to 
enable them to determine the worthi- 
ness, in Negro radio usage, is to re- 
assay the sales pattern their products 
now reveal, to find out, whether or not 
such products have a common affinity 
with Negroes and/or Southerners as 
consumers. 

Under this requisite, the advertiser 
may get to know the sympathetic rela- 
tionship between market groups, pre- 
sumed to be different, in social and 
economic backgrounds. 

When appealed to, through both 
Hillbilly and Spiritual programs over 
the same station, the impact can be 
measured separately. 

Local and/or regional sales man- 
agers inherit a greater control over the 
processes for merchandising tie-in, re- 
lated to the media and the product. 

Coverage of a market is not the only 
desirable element to be achieved by 
the national advertiser interested in 
Negro markets. Through the employ- 
ment of Negro market radio, penetra- 
tion is then possible, as well. 

Joe Wootton 

Director 

Radio Division 

Interstate United Newspapers 

New York 






r* 
II 
I 

A 

y 
r 
i 

M 



KNOW HOW 

*<IMM 

ANNOUNCEMENT 

OF NEW 
NATIONAL REP! 

Takeum ad in SPONSOR . . 
Tellum many Paleface 
about new brother — 
" Brave -Who-Cover-Coun try" 

WILLIAM G. 

RAM BEAU 

National Representatives 

Sellum OKLAHOMAN 
same way . . . 
Cover Market plenty 
MUSIC • NEWS • SPORTS 
Keepum Sponsors happy! 



Vice President 
Ceneral Manager 



REX M 

"CHIEF" LESTER 

\ 

A 
f 
I 

8 800 

OKLAHOMA CITY, OKLAHOMA 



KTflUI 



ITS THE 

FREQUENCY 

THAT COUNTS 



28 JULY 1952 



49 



WHEN 

TELEVISION 




RESULTS 

Here's a rich market . . . and 
here's Central New York's most 
looked at television station — 
ready to present your story to 
a "buying" audience. More top 
shows . . . more local adver- 
tisers . . . greater results. 



say "WHEN 



11 



CENTRAL NEW YORK'S MOST 
LOOKED AT TELEVISION STATION 



Represented Nationally 
By the KATZ AGENCY 



CBS 



ABC 



DUMONT 



WHEN 

TELEVISION 

SYRACUSE . 

A MEREDITH TV STATION 





agency profile 



Chester MaeCraehen 

V.p. & dir. radio-TV prod. 
Doherty, Clifford & Shenfield 



It isn't very often than an agency radio-TV director gets his name 
mentioned on a coast-to-coast TV show, so that an incident on Break 
the Bank last year was something of a precedent shatterer. In the 
middle of this show Bert Parks was delivering an Ipana commercial 
when it suddenly dawned on him that there had heen a script change- 
just before the show and that he was delivering the unrevised version. 
Throwing out his arms in a supplicating gesture. Parks cried into 
the camera, "Chester. Chester, forgive me. I really didn't mean it." 

Although this is not a typical incident, it is indicative of the sort 
of camaraderie that Chester MacCracken generates among his asso- 
ciates. He is the antithesis of the "Von Stroheim type" of radio-T\ 
director described in a recent sponsor article. In the score of years 
that he has been in the air media end of the agency business, no one 
recalls an instance of temperament or lost temper. 

Born in Chicago, Mac moved out to the quieter environs of Ore- 
gon at an early age. eventually took his degree at Oregon State. After 
seven years with Skelly Oil Co.. during which he switched from 
being a sales student to the advertising department, he worked for 
Scott Paper Co., J. Walter Thompson. Benton & Bowles and Pedlar 
& Ryan before hitching up with his present employer. 

Mac looks forward to the expansion of TV facilities for a number 
of reasons, one of which is the desire to avoid the loss of quality 
which results from the use of kinescopes. "It's not too much of a 
problem with Bristol-Myers" Break the Bank because bright lighting 
is used throughout the show," he says. "But Borden's Treasury Men 
in Action often uses low-key effects which transmit poorly on kine." 
"Another advantage of TV's expansion is the fact that the onl\ 
added cost to the sponsor will be time charges. Talent costs remain 
the same whether you use 10 stations or 1.500." 

"But. frankly. I don't see how it's possble. from a business economy 
point of view, to support 1.500 TV stations. Even with the limited 
number of stations, we have today, some of them arc still losing 
monej . 

From his office on the 52nd floor of the Empire State Building, 
Mac commutes to his home in Bronxville, N. Y. One of the few men 
in his line who doesn't see any sense in flogging a little white ball 
around the fairways, he gets his relaxation reading and puttering 
with photography. • • • 



50 



SPONSOR 



We've sorted out the facts 



Don't let the 240 pages scare you. 
Once you've cracked the 1952 Fall Facts Issue, you'll discover that 
we've kept your reading interests uppermost. We've indexed, section- 
alized, charted our thousands of facts. We've handled text in ques- 
tion-and-answer style. 

By all odds, this is the most factual and important of the six Fall 
Facts Issues published by SPONSOR. Naturally we're prejudiced. But 
unbiased readers are writing, wiring, and phoning that each of the 
eight sections is a honey — and we're doing any reader a service by sell- 
ing him on the extraordinary value of using its contents. 

The highlights of the book are Radio Basics, TV Basics, Interna- 
tional Basics, and the detailed TV Map. Each of these four sections 
is being made available in reprint form. Last year only the Radio Basics 
reprints were available; 30,000 were sold. 

If this ad sells you on the Fall Facts Issue ( that's its aim ) and you 
don't have a copy write to SPONSOR, 510 Madison Avenue, New 
York 22. 



SPONSOR 



the 



magazine for radio and TV advertisers 



28 JULY 1952 



51 




This SPONSOR department features capsuled 
broadcast advertising significance culled fro 
ments of the industry. Contributions are 

Oakland pitches its industrial 

Oakland. Cal., fed up with being re- 
garded as San Francisco's "kid broth- 
er," started a drive to promote itself 
back in 1936. This year, when Oakland 
added TV to its promotional efforts, it 
became probably the first advertiser to 
use TV for the purpose of pitching the 
industrial advantages of an area. 




To lure industry, films dramatized area pluses 

The Metropolitan Oakland Area 
(Alameda County) has a $70,000 an- 
nual advertising budget, financed en- 
tirely by city and county funds, in or- 
der to attract new industry to the area. 
This year Ryder '& Ingram Ltd., Oak- 
land ad agency, which handles the 
MOA account, decided to allocate 
$10,000 of the budget to TV (the rest 
goes largely for ads in business mags 
and newspapers, direct mail, follow-up 
activities). The thinking which led to 
the decision ran something like this: 
The best way to sell a prospect was to 
have him visit Oakland for a personal 
look. The next best was to make a full- 
length feature film and show it to him. 
Both of these were ruled out due to 
high cost and other factors. TV offered 
a means of showing off Oakland at 
comparatively low-cost — providing it 
was used smartly. 

The agency had three five-minute 
sound films built (bv the W. A. Pal- 
mer Company, San Francisco) on the 
general theme "Why they chose MOA." 
Fach featured a testimonial from an 
executive of a national firm telling whv 
his firm selected this area for a branch 
plant and how it worked out in actual 



advantages via TV 

operation. The three firms chosen were 
General Foods. Maxwell House Divi- 
sion; St. Regis Paper Company and 
Detroit Steel Products Company. 

These films were run between March 
and June on stations WPIX and 
WNBT. New York; WEWS and 
KNBK. Cleveland; WENR and WBKB, 
Chicago. To make sure that the right 
audience saw the films. MOA used 
mail, phone and wire to notify all in- 
dustrial prospects in each viewing area. 

From the standpoint of volume and 
quality of returns, according to Ryder 
& Ingram president, Ross H. Ryder, 
TV compared favorably with any of 
the other media being used (at the end 
of each film, they invited write-ins for 
a free book "Why they chose MOA of 
California'). But more important than 
the number, volume or quality of re- 
turns, said Ryder, were the scores of 
letters from business counsel, site-find- 
ing firms complimenting the area. 

Photo at left shows the key men in- 
volved in the campaign: (1. to r.) : 
Walter Eggert, pres., Oakland Cham- 
ber of Commerce; Maurice G. Read, 
chairman. Exec. Committee. MOA; 
Ross H. Ryder; Harry Bartell, chair- 
man. Alameda County Board of Super- 
visors, -k -k -k 



WLW-TV spurs activity with 
"'Operation Sunburst" 

To dissipate hot-weather inertia 
about TV, both audience- and advertis- 
er-wise, and to prove to sponsors that 
they can get as good results from TV 
in the summer as at any other time. 
WLW-TV (WLW-C, Columbus, WLW- 
D, Dayton, WLW-T, Cincinnati) is run- 
ning its allout summertime promotion 
plan "Operation Sunburst" for the sec- 
ond year. 

This year, in addition to a lineup of 
top-caliber summer shows backed to 
the hilt with continuous promotion, 
merchandising and exploitation, the 
drive is spearheaded by a special in- 
terest-provoking feature: a contest for 
viewers offering $50,000 in prizes. The 
contest centers on the theme "If I were 
President," capitalizes on the height- 
ened interest in politics this year. 
Strong viewing incentive is provided 
by the clues that the three WLW-TV 
stations flash on the screen daily — at 
irregular times — to help contestants an- 
swer 90 questions pertaining to the 
presidency. Each entrant must also 
write a short essay on what he would 
do if he were the chief executive. 

Launched on 17 June, the contest 
will run throughout the three-month 
"Sunburst" schedule. It is being ex- 
tensively promoted via newspaper ads. 
cab covers, car cards, 3,000 newsstand 
posters, truck posters, hundreds of 
counter cards, plus on-the-air promo- 
tions, day and night. Some 500,000 
entry blanks are being distributed 
throughout the area. 

Because of the "Sunburst" effort, 
WLW-TV reports a 35% gross billing 
increase for June 1952 over June 1951 ; 




WS1R plays weehend host to timehuyers at sporting event 

More than 59 timebuyers from lead- late in June. They are shown in the 

ing ad agencies were weekend guests photo above at Hancock Field, Syra- 

of WSYR and WSYR-TV (Syracuse) cuse, about to board one of the two 

at the Intercollegiate Rowing Regatta planes chartered for them by WSYR. 



52 



SPONSOR 



as of mid-July, 102 new accounts have 
been acquired. 

Advertisers tying in with "Sunburst" 
this summer include Clorets. Red Top 
Beer, B. C. Remedies, Tide, B. F. 
Goodrich. Sinclair Oil, French's Mus- 
tard. Palm Beach Suits, Albers Super- 
markets, Kroger Grocery Company. 

Among advertisers using "Sunburst ' 
resultfully last year, according to 
WLW-TV, were Ford Dealers, Raleigh 
Cigarettes, International Harvester, 
Minnesota Mining. American Vitamins. 
U. S. Tobacco, Arthur Murray. Pontiac 
Dealers. * * * 

Briefly . . . 

Jane Todd, woman commentator on 
KCBS, San Francisco, was the grand 
prize winner in the 1952 Wendy War- 
ren and the News I CBS Radio. Monday 
through Friday. 12:00 to 12:15 p.m.) 
\ft omens Commentator Contest. Her 
story of a Chinese-American housewife 
whose shrimp-fishing business will send 
three youngsters to college this fall 
won Jane Todd a stay in New York 
City, complete with a tour of high 
spots, as guest of General Foods and 
Benton & Bowles. 




KCBS commentator Todd won a whirl in N. Y. 

At a party held by Wendy Warren 
in Miss Todd's honor at the Savoy- 
Plaza Hotel, guests included (photo, 1. 
to r.) Henry Flynn, Eastern sales man- 
ager. CBS Radio Spot Sales: Jane 
Todd; Fred Hitchcock, product man- 
ager, Maxwell House Coffee Div., Gen- 
eral Foods; Wendy Warren; Harry 
Warren, Maxwell House account exec- 
utive. Benton & Bowles. 
* * * 

Following the House of Commons 
approval of a plan for making British 
television commercials, a slurring state- 
ment was made concerning American 
"Good taste" in TV commercials. Offi- 
cials of the Telepix Corporation, Holly- 
wood TV producer, rushed to the de- 
( Please turn to page 58) 



• COMPARE ... the Coverage with 
the Cost and You'll discover 
Why this Greater "Dollar Distance" 
Buy is Ringing More Cash 
Registers than ever 
for Advertisers! 




• Covers a tremendous 
Population Area 
in 5 States at the 
Lowest rate of any 
Major Station in 
this Region! 

"It's The DETROIT Area's Greater Buy!" 

Guardian Bldg. • Detroit 26 

Adam J. Younc, Jr., Inc., Nat'l Rep. • J. E. Campeau, President 



28 JULY 1952 



53 



PINPOINT 

YOUR 
PERSISTENT 

SALESMAN 




PROSPEROUS 
SOUTHERN 
NEW 
ENGLAND 
with 
UNDUPLKATED COVERAGE 
in 
220,000 

homes! 

Represented Nationally by 

Weed Television 

In New England — Bertha Bannan 



What's New in Research? 



Comparison of program types shows boxing 
topped by eomedy variety 




1-7 JUNE 1952 



1-7 JUNE 1951 



PROGRAM TYPE 


RANK 


AVG. RATING 


RANK 


AVG. RATING 


Comedy variety 


1 


25.6 





12.3 


Boxing 


2 


25.5 


1 


22.5 


Westerns 


3 


10.9 


4 


14.3 


Comedy situation 


4 


19.3 


5 


12.5 


Drama & Mysteries 


5 


17.8 


2 


16.7 


Talent competition 6 


15.0 


3 


15.3 


Horse racing 7 


12.0 


18 


4.5 


Musical variety 8 


11.5 


8 


10.7 


Quiz-Aud. Partic. 9 11.4 


9 


10.2 


Wrestling 10 10.7 


14 7.2 


No. Quarter-Hours: ©82 No. Quarter-Hours: 647 


(Source: Multi-Market Telepulse) 


Continent: Despite the rapid rise of comedy variety as the 


most popular TV program type, boxing still manages to stick close 


on the heels of the leader. It will also be noted that the only stand- 


ard program type that underwent a marked shift over the year was 


Drama & Mysteries. In June of last year it was the second most 


popular type. This year it ranks fifth. 



Xatiomil Ratinys top 10 proyratns 

(Percentage of homes reached in program station areas) 





TRENDEX 


TV 






NIELSEN RADIO 


Rank 


1-7 July 1952 
Program Rating 


Network 


Rank 


8-14 June 1952 
Program Rating 


1 


Talent Scouts 


29.9 


CBS 


1 


You Bet Your Lite 7.6 


2 


Godfrey's Friends 


26.2 


CBS 


2 


Broadway Is My Beat 7.2 


3 


Rocket Squad 


22.1 


CBS 


3 


Romance 6.7 


4 


Pabst Fights 


21.4 


CBS 


4 


Fibber McGee 6.6 


5 


The Web 


20.7 


CBS 


5 


Dr. Christian 6.2 


6 


Summer Theatre 


19.6 


NBC 


6 


Big Story 6.0 


7 


Big Town 


19.1 


NBC 


7 


Walk a Mile 5.9 


8 


Dragnet 


18.3 


NBC 


8 


The Lineup 5.3 


9 


Little Margie 


18.2 


CBS 


9 


Great Gildersleeve 5.3 


10 


Danger 


17.6 


CBS 


10 


Bob Hope 5.3 


Trendex Note: Republican 
all network ■ — 41.0 rating 


convention 


July 7. 







54 



SPONSOR 



Y####* available in reprint farm 

4 BASIC TOOLS FOR SPONSORS 



Radio Basil's (revised, 19S2) 

\(>-l>age supplement reprinted from 1952 Fall Facts 
issue. Includes 31 charts and tables statistically out- 
lining the vital facts of radio distribution, listening, 
cost-per-thousand, out-of-home listening, comparative 
media costs, hour-by-hour listening, effects of TV, etc. 



TV Basics ( a sponsor first) 

16-page reprint of supplement appearing in sponsor's 
Fall Facts issue. Statistical data on TV homes, viewing 
habits, cost-per-thousand, comparative media costs. 22 
charts presenting the case for TV as gathered from the 
best available research sources. 



TV Wlap (showing TV locations and network links) 

Shows every TV market and stations; lists number of 
sets in market, net affiliation of stations; representative 
for each station with New York phone number. 



international Basics (Radio & TV Abroad) 

Basic data on stations in the 50 countries outside 
U.S.A. that permit commercial broadcasting. Charts 
of international market and radio coverage; compari- 
son ivith newspapers; U. S. imports; U. S. advertisers 
and moneys spent; agencies doing business abroad, etc. 



SPONSOR 



The 



USE 



► 



► 



► 



» 



SPONSOR • 510 MADISON AVE. • 
Please send me copies of 

RADIO BASICS 



NEW YORK 22 



and Bill me later. 



Name 
Firm 



Address 

City 

10c. each in quantities of 100 or more; 15c. each for 25 or more; 25c. 
for single copy. 



State 



SPONSOR • 510 MADISON AVE. • NEW YORK 22 
Please send me copies of 

TV BASICS and Bill me later. 

Name 

Firm 



Address 

City 

10c. each in quantities of 100 or more; 15c. each for 25 or more; 25c. 
for single copy. 



State 



SPONSOR • 510 MADISON AVE. • NEW YORK 22 
Please send me copies of 

TV MAP and Bill me later. 

Name. ______^__ 

Firm 



Address 

City 

10c. each, 50 or more; 20c. each, 10 or more; single map free to sub- 
scribers; additional copy, 25c. 



State 



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Please send me copies of 

INTERNATIONAL BASICS 



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City 

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magazine for radio and TV advertisers 



COMMERCIAL REVIEWS 

i Continued from page 46) 

whenever the convention itself warranted 
a flash cut-in. A good gimmick and ex- 
cellent public relations. 

Also — this was the first time in history, 
I believe, that a program was enabled to 
interrupt a commercial and may very well 
start a trend in the industry, though I 
doubt it. 

The brief and fairly infrequent commer- 
cial chats with Betty covered a variety of 
subjects such as dehumidifiers, ranges and 



the propulsion equipment (whatever that 
is) on the new liner, United States. The 
copy was fairly colloquial and, as usual, 
well delivered. 



sponsor: 

agency: 

program: 



Philco 

Hutchins Adv. Co., N. Y. 

Republican Convention 



Having witnessed but a fraction of the 
convention sponsored by the above adver- 
tiser, I'm not in a position to make any 
sweeping statements. But I would like to 
point out one basic difference between Phil- 
co copy and what I saw (and described 




You can't cover Indiana's #2 
market from another state. 

Our rates are local and include 
complete merchandising distri- 
bution and promotion assistance. 

We serve 400,000 loyal listen- 
ers in Negro, rural, industrial, 
and four nationality groups. 

Only the Gary Sales Plan sells 
Indiana's second market. 

Call us without obligation. 

Gen. Mgr.-WWCA 



WWCA 

Gary Indiana's 
No. 2 Market 



* 



Chicago's 

Radio 

Monster 



above) for Westinghouse. I'm referring 
to the use of a voice-over treatment to de- 
pict the virtues of a piece of equipment 
versus the straightforward presentation of 
a Betty Furness talking-as-she-demon- 
strates. 

Here is a fair comparison of the two 
techniques and, of course, the more direct 
(Furness) method beats the voice-over 
hands down. I say "of course" because 
a person talking as product features are 
pointed out by the speaker is far closer 
to the direct type of selling done on the 
retail sales floor, and since TV is at its 
best when it's closest to retail selling, voice- 
over is obviously the weaker of the two. 

In fact, I often wonder why so much 
voice-over is used for demonstration copy. 
It seems silly to have one voice talk while 
another person in pantomime points to the 
features being described. This puts an in- 
surmountable acting-burden on the thes- 
pian doing the mute demonstration as well 
as dissipating the greatest value of televi- 
sion, namely, its ability to combine inte- 
grated sight, sound and motion. Philco's 
pretty little girl gesturing at the refriger- 
ator while a man's voice extolled same was 
inane — but not her fault. 



sponsor: 
agency: 



program : 



Wheaties 

Dancer-Fitzgerald -Sample, 
Inc., N. Y. 

Stu Erwm Show 



Wheaties copy on the Erwin show as 
evidenced by the middle break on 7 July- 
is an example of well rounded salesman- 
ship. This effort delivered Mike Fitzmau- 
rice as a sportscaster, Stan Musial as a 
home run hitter, a giant size kernel of 
wheat as a demonstrator, and some slick 
optical work as package-identifier. 

Within the span of a single commercial, 
we thus covered a number of very sound 
and diverse, but well-related copy points. 
The sports insert which progresses from 
crowd-scene to the sportscaster in his booth 
and then to the field is well shot and edited 
so that it appears to be a continuous piece 
of filmed action (which I'm sure it isn't), 
and the part played by Fitzmaurice is thor- 
oughly convincing. 

I'm not sure that the giant wheat kernel 
as it is taken apart to point out its energy- 
supply, etc., is a very tasty thought but it 
certainly is a graphic one. 

As for the gimmick at the end — pop-ons 
of the various letters which go to spell the 



56 



SPONSOR 



name Wheaties on the box — here is a fine 
bit of attention-holding art and lab-work. 
It is replete with action, since each letter 
also brings with it a line-drawing of some- 
one engaged in a sport-endeavor — it is 
relevant because of the way the visual 
treatment is achieved, and it is dramatic 
since the motion really holds the eye and 
fixes the product name in one's mind. 

agency: Schick Electric Shavers 

program: Kudner Agency, Inc., N. Y. 

SPONSOR: Crime Syndicated 

I have only one bone to pick with the 
copy used for this electric shaver — and 
it's simply this. Every woman (not the 
market, I realize) and most men who see 
this copy in which the salesman uses the 
shaver and then hands it to the prospec- 
tive customer to use is horrified, disgusted, 
and repelled. I daresay even the most mas- 
culine male feels that there is something 
unsanitary and downright vulgar about 
this — almost as bad as using someone else's 
toothbrush. 

Hence no matter how good the product 
and how sound the demonstration of it 
on this footage, a repulsive thought such 
as perpetrated here, as graphically as TV 
can do it, serves to unsell Schick shavers. 



MEN, MONEY, MOTIVES 

(Continued from page 6) 

tricky, not candid, loaded with selective 
statistics. Worse, copy has been written 
on occasion more to appeal to the 
known prejudices of the men okaying 
the appropriation than to appeal to 
John Q. Public. This was the sort of 
self-deception by Boards of Directors 
against which Fortune sounded off. 



A symbol, it seems, of the hoked-up 
kind of institutional advertising which 
has drawn unfavorable comment is the 
barefoot boy with fishing pole. Just 
why this barefoot boy, out of James 
Whitcomb Riley, is supposed to be so 
nostaglic, so beguiling, so perfect an 
argument for rugged individualism is 
never explained. But the folklore seems 
uncritically accepted among advertis- 
ing copy writers that almost any Board 
of Directors is sure to purr with delight 
if they are shown some variation of 
Huckleberry Finn. 



Fortune has called the roll of non- 



The 

General Electric Company 

Announces 
The Appointment of 

THE HENRY I. CHRISTAL CO 

New York, Chicago 
as 

National Sales Representative 
for 

Radio Station 

WGY 

Effective August 1, 1952 



28 IULY 1952 



57 



sense in institutional advertising. But 
none of the valid objections to copy 
hokum invalidates the usefulness of 
"institutional" advertising itself. What 
is needed is better use, not abandon- 
ment. 

ft ft # 

Fairfax (imie. president of Foote, 
("one & Belding. emphasized anew re- 
cently before the National Industrial 
Advertisers Association in Chicago the 
vast need of getting business more fa- 
vorably impressed upon the people. It 
was too widely accepted, he argued. 



that success in business was equivalent 
to failure in morals. Great numbers of 
Americans still bought the concept that 
"bigness is bad and that business is 
sharpie, wholly materialistic and pred- 
atory, and profoundly unscrupulous." 
* * * 

Cone spoke of institutional advertis- 
ing as building-in a third-dimensional 
factor in the public's picture of busi- 
ness. This is a good analogy. Plainly 
the public often lacks understanding in 
depth of business. But it goes the other 
way round, too. Often enough business 



;&w«r« 




An independent survey of radio listening habits in the 
Red River Valley was recently made by students at 
North Dakota Agricultural College. The Survey cov- 
ered 3,969 farm families in 22 counties within about 90 
miles of Fargo. In answer to the question, "To what 
radio station does your family listen most?" 78.6% of 
the families said WDAY, 4.4% Station "B", 2.3% Sta- 
tion "C", 2.1% Station "D", etc. WDAY was a 17-to- 
1 choice over the next station . . . a i'/^-ro-I favorite 
over all competition combined!*' 

It's the same story in town. Year after year, WDAY 
makes a run-away of the Hooper race, consistently get- 
ting a 3-to-l greater Share of the Fargo-Moorhead 
Audience than all other stations combined! 

Truly, WDAY is a colossal radio buy in a stupendous 
farm market. Write direct, or ask Free 8C Peters for 
all the facts. 




^Competition includes local studios of the other three 
major networks. 

WDAY • NBC • 970 KILOCYCLES • 5000 WATTS 
Fret- & Peters , Inc., Exclusive National Representatives 



managements exhibit a lack of under- 
standing in depth of the way ordinary 
Joes react. No barefoot boys with fish- 
ing poles, they. * * * 



ROUNDUP 

{Continued from page 53) 

fense; they immediately sent a dem- 
onstration reel of typical American TV 
commercials to the House of Commons 
to disprove the statement. Ad agencies 
handling products which had TV 
pitches on the reel included Roy S. 
Durstine, Calkins & Holden, Tim Mor- 
row, Hixson-Jorgensen. Ringer and As- 
sociates. Richard B. Atchison, Leonard 
Shane. 

* * •::- 

The newest Frederick W. Ziv Com- 
pany radio production. Freedom, U. S. 
A. — a dramatic, informative series 
about the American scene starring Ty- 
rone Power — will be released for 
broadcast early in September. This is 
the first Ziv radio program since / Was 
A Communist for the FBI was inlro- 
duced last year. Freedom, U. S. A. 
combines showmanship with the reali- 
ties of the American scene today, ac- 
cording to John L. Sinn, executive v.p. 
of Ziv; was created by Ziv in response 
to requests by many radio stations that 
they produce another new program. 



58 



KFWB. Los Angeles, points with 
pride to the results achieved in a one- 
day announcement campaign for Wil- 
shire Beverages. Sponsor used 23 half- 
minute announcements. Bob Kaufman, 
KFWB account executive, reports a to- 
tal of 5,798 cards and letters in re- 
sponse; this, he stresses, in a market 
which has 23 radio stations and seven 
TV stations. 

«- * » 

The 150th anniversary of the Du- 
Pont Company on 18 July was marked 
by ceremonies at the site of the com- 
pany's first mill on Brandywine Creek. 
Wilmington, Del. Included was a one- 
hour program on NBC Radio. In con- 
nection with the anniversary, DuPont 
has published a book. "DuPont — The 
Autobiography of an American Enter- 
prise" — tracing the company's role in 
the growth and development of the 
nation. DuPont currently sponsors 
Cavalcade of America (Tuesdays, 8:00 
to 8:30 p.m. I on NBC radio, through 
BBDO: may extend show to NBC TV 
this fall. 

SPONSOR 



The 15 local chapters of the Ameri- 
can Association of Advertising Agen- 
cies report that the recently-elected 
chairmen of the Boards of Governors 
of each chapter are as follows: Chesa- 
peake Chapter: Joseph Katz. Joseph 
Katz Company, Baltimore; Cleveland: 
S. L. Abrams. Ohio Advertising Agen- 
cy; Dayton: Hugo Wagenseil, Hugo 
Wagenseil & Associates; Northern Cali- 
fornia: John J. Wiley, Kenyon & Eck- 
hardt, San Francisco; Oregon: Wayne 
R. Leland. House and Leland; Phila- 
delphia: Wesley M. Ecoff, Ecoff & 
James, Inc.; Pittsburgh: Harry P. 
Vieth, BBDO; Puget Sound: J. F. Crol- 
lard, Ruthrauff & Ryan, Seattle; Rocky- 
Mountain: Carl A. Salstrand, Ball & 
Davidson; St. Louis: E. E. Krom- 
nacker, Arthur R. Mogge, Inc.; South- 
ern California: Lee Ringer, Ringer & 
Associates, L.A. : Southeast Chapter: 
W. W. Neal, Liller, Meal & Battle, At- 
lanta; Southwest: Wilson W. Crook. 
Crook Adv. Agency. Dallas; Spokane: 
Harvey A. Brassard, Devine & Bras- 
sard, Inc.; Twin City: Harold C. Wal- 
ker, Harold C. Walker Advertising. 



STOCKS ON THE AIR 

{Continued from page 23) 

various needs. 

Despite the fact that the campaign 
was basically institutional, with rela- 
tively minor stress placed on obtaining 
leads, it produced more leads at less 
cost than was previously obtained from 
printed media. The quality of the leads, 
in terms of conversion to sales, matched 
those which had been drawn by the 
financial section of The Neiv York 
Times — but at substantially lower cost- 
per-lead. 

In the matter of actual sales, which 
is what really counts, the show has cost 
the sponsor about 40 for each dollar 
of sales. Each program pulls from 200- 
300 leads (about 85 per week, from as 
far away as Philadelphia) which are 
followed up by three weeklv letters and 
a personal solicitation if the prospect 
seems "hot." Now taking a summer 
hiatus, the program will be on the air 
again in the fall. 

So successful has the WOR show 
been that recordings of it are used by 
Kidder. Peabody over WHDH, Boston, 
and WGN, Chicago. Transcriptions 
have been used by other dealers for 
sales meetnigs and a Wichita dealer. 
Small-Milburn Co., started broadcast- 



ing a recording a short time ago. 

Kidder, Peabody also tried eight- 
and 20-second breaks on NBC i \ - 
Today but found the time insufficient 
to get their story across. They plan to 
try five-minute segments of the morn- 
ing TV show soon. 

Another broker who has made suc- 
cessful use of the air to promote mu- 
tual funds is Bache & Co.. New York 
I via Albert Frank-Gunther Law). 
Bache tried a number of program t\pes 
before settling on thrice-a-week spon- 
sorship of Today's Business, a 7:15 to 



7:20 p.m. WOR show conducted night- 
ly by Henry Gladstone. This show, cur- 
rently on the air. features a general 
roundup of business and financial 
news, important stock market quota- 
tions and trends. The commercial con- 
sists of a pitch for mutual funds in 
general, stresses the reliability and ser- 
vices of Bache & Co. in particular. 

That a mass market for mutual funds 
exists is indicated In the Brookings 
Institution study. It found that more 
than 1.220.000 individual sharehold- 
ers in the I*. S. are members of lam- 




Only ONE Station DOMINATES 

THIS RICH, CROWING 15-COUNTY MARKET 

WITH 

HOME FURNISHINGS SALES OF $38,324,000 

Sales Management' 1952 Survey of Buying Power 




^?e y(ma<K<i/£ert&k^ £&iZt0n> 



AM FM 

WINSTON-SALEM 



NBC Affiliate 



Represented b»: 
HE4DIEYREED CO 



28 JULY 1952 



59 



ily groups with annual incomes of less 
than $4,000; 2,880,000 stockholders 
are in the $5,-10,000 bracket. 

The brokers' big problem is one of 
educating his market and developing 
trust in investment brokers. As a re- 
sult of the 1929 market crash persons 
of moderate means have been quite 
cautious about investing their limited 
finances in a particular common stock. 
In other words, they have hesitated to 
put all their cash eggs in one basket. 
Their limited means (and knowledge) 
also prohibited them from purchasing 
a diversified portfolio of stocks so that 
if one stock dropped abruptly the oth- 
ers could take up the slack. 

Along came the mutual funds. De- 
spite the fact that various investment 
funds have been available for over 25 
vears. it has only been during the past 



decade that their assets have increased 
from $500,000,000 to more than $3,- 
000,000,000. The more people who got 
to know about this form of investment, 
the more who diverted surplus capital 
to it. 

Oversimplified, the principle of mu- 
tual funds is that an investor can pur- 
chase a piece, however small, of a large 
pool of diversified stocks (and some- 
times bonds). These pools, or port- 
folios, are set up with specific invest- 
ment purposes. 

An investor, for example, could pur- 
chase stock in a pool whose purpose is 
to guarantee (as much as anything can 
be guaranteed these days) a dividend 
yield which, while comparatively safe, 
is in excess of what he can get from a 
savings bank or government bond. Or 
he can get into a fund whose specula- 



In HANNIBALAND 

THEY have money 
to spend! 



* HANNIBALAND-z/h Urge 41 county 
area surrounding Hannibal, Mo., 
Quincy, III., and Keokuk, Iowa. 




The population of the rich Hannibaland area is mostly 

rural. These are the folks who have the money to spend 

to buy your products. To sell 'em use the station they 

listen to most— KHMO. 

KHMO reaches and sells the buying power of the 

240,470 radio families who live in this large, 41 county 

area. 

Make your selling job easy in the middle-west in 

Hannibaland — buy KHMO. Write, wire or phone 

KHMO or Pearson today for availabilities. 



KHMO 



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John E. Pearson Company 

• 

Mutual Network 

Hannibal, Missouri 

1000 watts at night 



tive nature is such that a good possibil- 
ity exists of increasing his capital in- 
vestment. Or he may want a hedge 
against inflation on the theory that 
common stock values more closely mir- 
ror current prices than does govern- 
ment currency. 

Bache & Co. manages to get one or 
more of these points across on each 
show and finish the job on the follow- 
up. 

This is not the first Bache experience 
with air media. A trial period on the 
Tex and Jinx Show (NBC) pulled a 
load of inquiries but resulted in few 
sales. A CBS news show late at night 
had similar results. The trick seems to 
be to pick a show that draws a particu- 
lar type of audience. 

Says Albert Frank-Gunther Law's ra- 
dio-TV director. Robert Day: "We 
have found that radio, properly used. 

*••••••• 
"Radio advertising is not as 'big a 
business' as it should be — nowhere big 
enough. Annual radio advertising vol- 
ume is roughly equivalent to the dollar 
volume of tires sold each year by only 
one of the leading tire companies. It 
is about the same as the sales at candy 
stands in theater lobbies. Is radio ad- 
vertising less important than the candy 
and popcorn sold in theaters?" 

CHARLES C. CALEY 
Chairman of Board. BAB 

• •*••••• 

not only gets us prospects at a much 
lower cost-per-lead than printed media, 
but that we can convert a higher pro- 
portion of leads into substantial sales." 

Bache & Co. are currently sponsoring 
the Paul Gibson Show over WBBM, 
Chicago, after a year's use of John 
Harrington's newscasts. In Philadel- 
phia, they tried classical music over 
WCAU, have now switched to 6:00 
p.m. newscasts once a week. They plan 
to try some a.m. participations over 
KYW in the fall. 

The importance of program selection 
is exemplified by the experience of 
Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Beane. 
As far back as 1948 this firm tried a 
number of radio formats and finally 
took a hefty plunge into TV. It signed 
for a nine-week sponsorship of a show 
called America Speaks, featuring Dr. 
George Gallup. Coming during the 
election season, the NBC TV network 
program built a large audience and 
pulled a fair number of leads. The 
show came to an abrupt halt after Gal- 
lup's flat prediction of a win for Dewey 
proved wrong. Nobody wants to talk 
aboul the show now. but it is obvious 



60 



SPONSOR 



that the reasoning behind the cancel- 
lation was simple: how do you expect 
to build confidence in your selections 
in the highly complicated financial 
market when you can't pick which of 
two men will win an election? 

Since that debacle MLPFB's air ac- 
tivities have been limited to supplying 
radio stations with quotations from the 
New York Stock Exchange in return 
for a plug. At present 14 stations carry 
stock prices, nine broadcast commodity 
quotations, and 20 carry both. 

Another stock selling advertiser is no 
longer on TV for an altogether differ- 
ent reason. His success was apparently 
too great. 

This story needs a bit of background. 
The cancelled sponsor, Tellier & Co., 
is an investment house — not a member 
of the New York Stock Exchange — - 
which specializes in speculative slock 
issues. These stocks rarely sell for 
more than 35tf a share (often as low 
as 15^) — commonly referred to by the 
big brokers as "cats and dogs." 

Walter Tellier, president of the bro- 
kerage house, operates on the theory 
that the little fellow is just as entitled 
to a little "action" in the market as the 
big boys. He makes no bones about 
the speculative nature of his offerings. 

Working with his agency man, Bob 
Day (Albert Frank-Gunther Law), he 
cooked up a format for a TV pitch. 
They then bought a participation on 
WPIX's 7:15 Show, a movie program 
m.c.'d by one time child star Freddie 
Bartholomew. 

The stock selected was that of the 
Trad Cabinet Corp. of Asbury Park, 
N. J., a firm organized for the purpose 
of building cabinets for TV sets. The 
plan was to offer just under $300,000 
worth of stock at 25^ per share. 

Bob Day learned just before the first 
show went on the air that Tellier had 
held 20 of his salesmen at the office to 
take phone calls, and gloomily pic- 
tured them playing cards all night long. 

Then came the show. After an in- 
troduction from Bartholomew, Walter 
Tellier stood up with a long pointer, 
aimed it at a blown-up stock prospec- 
tus that dominated the screen. "Ladies 
and gentlemen," he said, "my name is 
Walter Tellier and I'm a stock broker 
with offices at 42 Broadway. I'm here 
this evening to tell you a little some- 
thing about a purely speculative stock 
that we are offering in a new com- 
pany." 

After making his pitch and warning 



^Jhe ^Jelevl&lon ^rudience of \Joduu 

In answer to a number of requests, we are publishing 
below a complete list of studies covered to date 
through "The Television Audience of Today." All 
of these studies are still available and many be pur- 
chased from the TV section of Advertest Research. 



NO. 
NO. 
NO. 
NO. 

NO. 
NO. 
NO. 
NO. 
NO. 
NO. 10 
NO. 11 
NO. 12 
NO. 13 
NO. 14 
NO. 15 
NO.. 16 
NO. 17 
NO. 18 
NO. 19 
NO. 20 
NO. 21 
NO. 22 
NO. 23 
NO. 24 
NO. 25 
NO. 26 
NO. 27 
NO. 28 
NO. 29 
NO. 30 
NO. 31 
NO. 32 
NO. 33 
NO. 34 
NO. 35 
NO. 36 
NO. 37 
NO. 38 
NO. 39 
NO. 40 



March, 1949 Daytime Television 

April, 1949 Children's Programs 

May, 1949 Radio vs. Television 

June, 1949 Night-time Television 

July, 1949 Advertising Effectiveness 

August, 1949 Summertime Television 

Sept., 1949 Sports and Television 

Oct., 1949 Television Drama 

Nov., 1949 Advertising Effectiveness 

Dec, 1949 Television News 

Jan., 1950 Television Movies 

Feb., 1950 Radio vs. Television 

March, 1950 Advertising Effectiveness 

April, 1950 TV's Effect on Reading Habits 

May, 1950 Television Variety Programs 

June, 1950 Daytime Television 

July, 1950 TV Index of Product Usage 

Aug., 1950 Purchases of Durable Goods 

Sept., 1950 Television Commercials 

Oct., 1950 Children's Televiewing 

Nov., 1950 TV vs. Radio — 18 Month Comparison 

Dec, 1950 Televiewing After 11 PM 

Jan., 1951 Advertising Effectiveness 

Feb., 1951 Week-end TV Habits 

March, 1951 TV Mystery Programs 

April, 1951 TV Western Programs 

May, 1951 Daytime Television 

June, 1951 Weekly vs. Alternate Week Program 

July, 1951 Study of Non-Owners 

August, 1951 Summertime Television 

Sept., 1951 TV News and Educational Programs 

Oct., 1951 Television Commercials 

Nov., 1951 TV vs. Radio— 30 Month Comparison 

Dec, 1951 Sports and TV 

Jan., 1952 Movies and Television 

Feb., 1952 Early Evening Televiewing 

March, 1952 Television Drama 

April, 1952 Product Usage 

May, 1952 Daytime Television 

June, 1952 TV Spot Commercials 



90 BAYARD STREET 

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28 JULY 1952 



61 




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rown 

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Big New Off 


uce Bldg. 


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Dere All 






I here you 


got a 


new job with Mr. 
Lever. 1 wanna 




F*/"»L 


f tell you about th' 


f\ £,' 


a/» 


new brand of 
baseball here we 
got with th 
Senators in th' 
Amurican Assn. 
Charleston iz now 




rfl 


i in big company 
| with Milwakey, 
1 Minnevapolus, 






f Louise ville and 
thim other big 
cities. Bite now 


I y^^mf \ 




we're drawin 


1 1 

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bigger crowds 




than thim. 




Charleston is 




sure full of biz- 




ness. Wall, may- 






be it ain't gist 


yy^fff- 




S| ('.has. but th' 




vW^ 


Whole Kanawha 


^m 




Vallie. Lux end 
Pepsodent h a z 


lllUllll S(//<'\ 


hear A 


in be boosted with 


WCHS with 


5,000 


at 580. Th' boss sez 


we got more 


W.Va 


. lisseners then any 


other stashun in th' state. 






Yrs., 






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w c 


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Charleston, W. Va. 




viewers that the company wouldn't 
start to pay off for three or four years, 
if then, he invited phone calls to his 
office for further details. He gave the 
phone number, urged them to "do it 
now." 

The office switchboard lit up like a 
Christmas tree. Salesmen had time 
only to take names and addresses be- 
fore breaking off to answer another 
call. Literature was mailed out the 
same night and a follow-up made three 
days later. Between 500 and 600 calls 
were received after each telecast with a 
high mark of 800 being hit one night. 

Relates Tellier: "Those telecasts real- 
ly produced for us. We got leads at a 
cost of about l&V apiece. Newspaper 
ads had supplied leads at about $2-2.50 
each. You can see why we were en- 
thusiastic about continuing the WPIX 
series. But when renewal time came 
around the station made all kinds of 
excuses for refusing our business."' 

(A WPIX spokesman told sponsor 
that the reason the contract was not 
extended was that "the product offered 
was too speculative.") 

Following up leads produced by the 
telecasts, Tellier salesmen were able to 
convert better than 50% of the pros- 
pects into stockholders, with orders 
averaging about $100 per sale. But 
Tellier has been unable to buy TV time 
since then. 

Among the other investment firms 
which have used the air is the Wel- 
lington Fund of Philadelphia which has 
tried eight-second spots, turned to giv- 
ing away about $1,000 worth of shares 
in return for plugs on Stop the Music 
(ABC TV). A TV ticker tape idea 
didn't pan out and was dropped by 
WOR-TV. 

The use of radio by investment 
houses and financial magazines in gen- 
eral is on the upsurge. Currently 
Shields & Co. in Buffalo. Dempsey, 
Tegeler in Los Angeles, Esterbrook & 
Co. in Boston and Small-Milburn in 
Wichita are additional firms using ra- 
dio successfully. 

As more brokers and their agencies 
learn to use the medium a definite trend 
is developing. Says Marty Monroe. 
WOR sales executive, "We now have 
seven business and financial shows per 
week going. As a result of their suc- 
cess, we expect to have at least four 
more programs of this type on the air 
next fall. There's a rich market here 
for advertisers.'' * * * 



62 



SPONSOR 



WFAA FAIR 

[Continued from page 27) 

There'll be souvenirs . . . prizes . . . 
pictures . . . and a special contest for 
amateur camera fans. Any day next 
week from 5:30 in the morning until 
10:00 at night. This will be the largest 
anniversary celebration WFAA has 
ever had . . . and it's all for you. Plan 
to be with us sometime next week. 
Save a day for WFAA. I'll be looking 
for you." 

Backing this up was the newspaper 
advertising campaign which ran from 
15 to 30 June in the Dallas Morning 
News (owner of the station) plus the 
the plentiful editorial coverage which 
that and other papers gave the event. 

Visitors arrived at WFAA's pent- 
house studios in its building on Jack- 
son Street in Dallas via a "sky bridge" 
which connected that building with the 
next one. On the bridge were histori- 
cal exhibits telling the story of the sta- 
tion's growth from the tent-enclosed 
studio area in the library of the former 
Dallas News building in 1922, to the 
50,000-watt NBC and Texas Quality 
Network ,and 5,000-watt ABC affiliate 
it is toda) . I The station operates half- 
time at 820 kc on the 50,000-watt na- 
tional channel, and half-time at 570 kc 
on the 5,000-watt regional channel. ) 

All visitors registered for sponsor- 
contributed door prizes, with the draw- 
ings coming three times a day: at 
10:30 a.m., 3:00 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. 
Among the 65-odd advertisers donat- 
ing daily door prizes were General 
Foods. Standard Brands. Procter & 
Gamble, Kraft Foods. Manhattan Soap 
Company. Charles Antell, Gulf Oil, 
Brown & Williamson, Cudahy Packing, 
The Mennen Company. Cook Chemical 
Company, Mercantile National Bank. 
R. C. A., Earl Hayes Chevrolet Com- 



pare. Pacific Citrus Products Com- 
pany. At the end of the anniversary 
week came the drawing for the grand 
prizes: a Philco refrigerator; two dia- 
mond and gold Bulova watches; a 
Slumberton Mattress; a course at Pa- 
tricia Stevens School of Modeling; a 
Magnavox radio-phono combination. 

Two of the station's studios were 
turned into exhibit halls of colorful dis- 
plays of sponsors' products and star 
pictures. Network sponsors-shows-and- 
stars displavs lined the walls of one 
studio in free-standing display units. 
Among products represented were Co- 
ca - Cola, Alka - Seltzer, Dreft, Kix, 
Wheaties, Old Gold cigarettes, Philip 
Morris, Kellogg's dry cereals, Allsweet 
Oleomargarine, Mutual of Omaha, 
U. S. Steel, Ex-Lax, Anacin, Schlitz 
beer. 

"Growing with WFAA" was the 
theme of the display featuring spot ad- 
vertisers, including Bulova Watches, 
Tender Leaf Tea, Wonder Bread, Bryl- 
creem, Neuhoff's Frankfurters, Dallas 
Power & Light Company, Pillsbury's 
Best Flour, Pepsodent. 

All local programs were given hall- 
way shadow-box display space, combin- 
ing show, talent and sponsor's product 
in eye-arresting units. Among pro- 
grams featured were the 23-year-old 
Early Birds, sponsored by Aunt Jemi- 
ma Flour, The Mennen Company and 
Morton's Foods among others, and the 
Saturday Night Shindig, now in its 
ninth year and sponsored by the Fant 
Milling Company. 

Local news advertisers had a corner 
in one of the studios all to themselves; 
among them were Time and Life Mag- 
azines. Griffin A-B-C Shoe Polish, Dal- 
las Railway & Terminal Company, Nu- 
trena Egg Mash, Slumberon Mattresses, 
Admiral TV. 

With its anniversary, WFAA demon- 



strated that any event which a station 
runs in order to build good will for it- 
self among listeners can also be used to 
boost its advertisers — with benefit to 
all. • • • 



CONVENTIONS 

I Continued from page 25 \ 

be higher than female interest, West- 
inghouse should have inserted some 
commercials that would appeal more to 
a man. Miss Furness was on 77 TV 
commercials during the Republican 
Convention and spoke for about 114 
minutes of the total 138. One-third of 
Westinghouse's radio commercials were 
done by Miss Furness in transcriptions 
tailored especially for the audio me- 
dium. 

While agency people and those in 
the appliance trade in general were 
complimentary about convention air 
advertising, a sharp critical note was 
injected in exclusive statements to 
sponsor by a group of consultants to 
the Democratic National Committee. 
These consultants, who monitored the 
Republican convention on TV from 
beginning to end, were led by J. Leon- 
ard Reinsch, managing director of the 
five radio and TV stations owned by- 
James Cox I Democratic Presidential 
candidate in 1920). Reinsch, now on 
leave, has been President Truman's 
radio-TV adviser since the beginning 
of his administration. 

Some of the criticism laid bare 
basic questions also bothering radio 
and TV clients sponsor interviewed. 

Kenneth D. Fry. Democratic Nation- 
al Committee radio-TV director, said: 
"Complete sponsorship of convention 
coverage by one advertiser is of ques- 
tionable value. Although sponsor iden- 
tification runs high, increasing an- 




28 JULY 1952 



63 




TWO TOP 

CBS RADIO STATIONS 

TWO BIG 

SOUTHWEST MARKETS 

ONE LOW 

COMBINATION RATE 



Sales-winning radio 
schedules for the Great 
Southwest just naturally 
include this pair of top- 
producing CBS Radio 
Stations. Results prove 
this! Write, wire or phone 
our representatives now 
for availabilities and 
rates! 

National Representatives 



JOHN BLAIR & CO. 



tagonism is generated by repeatedly 
hammering away for the same sponsor. 
Many viewers consider a national po- 
litical convention as a public property 
and harbor some resentment against 
commercialism of it. . . . 'Irritant value' 
may be considered desirable by some 
advertisers but certainly not by all 
successful sponsors." 

This view was seconded by Elmo 
Ellis. Reinsch's assistant, and program 
director of WSB, Cox station in At- 
lanta. Ellis felt that exclusive sponsor- 
ship was a waste of money. He ex- 
plained: "Since a considerable per- 
centage of the audience stays put for 
hours at a time during convention pro- 
ceedings, one advertiser does not need 
exclusive sponsorship to obtain effec- 
tive coverage." 

The benefits of participating spon- 
sorship are twofold, Ellis went on. The 
sponsor saves money and the viewer 
gets more variety in the commercials. 

Reinsch raised the question of wheth- 
er it was advisable to telecast the entire 
convention. He said: "A committment 
to cover virtually everything from 
opening to closing gavel ties up the 
network and its affiliates so completely 
that serious revenue losses from can- 
celled programs are inevitable, even 
though some portions of the proceed- 
ing offer little of interest to the listener 
and could just as well be skipped." He 
recommended "limited, high-spot cov- 
erage rather than (the sale of) a cer- 
tain number of hours of the conven- 
tion." 

The 60-hour G.O.P. convention 
nicked the networks for a handsome 
sum. everyone agrees. At least 36 hours 
of sponsored TV network time alone 
was cancelled by the four webs. The 
breakdown was. CBS. 16%; NBC, 15; 
DTN. 31/4, and ABC, Vfa. The radio 
network and local station tab. together 
with additional operating costs due to 
the unexpected additional time, prob- 
ablv made the Republican convention 
alone one of the most expensive broad- 
cast undertakings of all time. 

The Mutual radio network was also 
hit financially because of preemptions 
of commercial time, but not as badly 
as the other networks. Mutual sold 
its coverage of the conventions locally 
on a co-op basis. However, the pub- 
lisher of the Farm Journal and Path- 
finder magazines picked up the tab 
(about $15,000 to $20,000 a week) 
for nine daily network public service 
announcements during both of the 
conventions. 



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Of the four networks, only CBS had 
a contract providing for additional 
payments beyond a certain number of 
hours of convention coverage. Du- 
Mont. which like CBS signed up West- 
inghouse, got no such clause. Neither 
did NBC or ABC. The latter three 
promised the sponsors that if they 
didn't provide a certain amount of con- 
vention time, the sponsors would get 
rebates, but the contracts didn't work 
the other way. 

To recoup some of the lost money 
for stations, the networks hoped to 
provide radio station breaks every half- 
hour, at least one station break an hour 
on TV. Because of the unpredictabili- 
ty of the convention proceedings this 
was not always possible, but it was 
noted that when station breaks did oc- 
cur some stations tried to make up for 
lost time with double-spotting of com- 
mercials. 

This prompted another one of the 
Democratic observers to warn against 
the practice. Bob Swan, vice president 
in charge of radio and TV, Joseph 
Katz Co. (Democratic National Com- 
mittee ad agency) declared: 

"Network sponsors of national events 
need protection on the local station. 
Not all stations were guilty of this prac- 
tice, but some outlets carried — in ad- 
dition to network commercials — gobs 
of local commercials, which they 
packed, pushed and sandwiched in at 
every station break. It is doubtful that 
such practice does any good for either 
the network sponsor or the local ad- 
vertisers under such conditions, since 
it causes so much ill will on the part 
of listeners and viewers." 

Another crucial question about con- 
vention sponsorship was brought up 
by Ellis, who doubted whether appli- 
ance manufacturers are the ideal con- 
vention sponsors. "The person who is 



seriously interested in the convention," 
he said, "will not sil patiently through 
an appliance demonstration or an in- 
volved sales pitch. He will accept, how- 
ever, brief commercials that sell brand 
names or make a public relations 
pitch." Among the products which he 
thought lend themselves to convention 
commercials. Ellis listed cigarettes, 
chewing gum and soft drinks. 

Fry also urged short commercials, 
preferably from 10 to 20 seconds. Any- 
thing over a minute, he said, risks cut- 
ting into vital convention proceedings 
and creating audience resentment. 

The seemingly overwhelming prob- 
lem of audience irritation bothered the 
sponsors from the beginning. Accord- 
ing to Ed Sherwood, who coordinated 
Admiral's convention advertising, com- 
mercials as short as five seconds wen- 
available for situations where impor- 
tant convention goings-on made longer 
pitches impractical. Westinghouse 
brought along 18 flip cards for use in 
30-second commercials (the average 
Westinghouse commercial was less than 
90 seconds). On the first day of the 
CO. P. gathering, a Philco official or- 
dered a cut in the length of the com- 
mercials. Transparencies of the Philco 
name were often used against a shot of 
the convention to avoid interruption 
with a commercial when it was obvious 
the viewer would want to watch what 
was going on. 

All three sponsors made it a point 
of policy to insert a commercial only 
when nothing important was going on. 
Westinghouse appliance division's J. 
C. Baird. who was in charge of airing 
Westinghouse commercials at the con- 
vention, told sponsor: "We would 
sometimes go for an hour and a half 
without a single commercial. Then 
when things got dull, we might put on 
a few* within a short time. That prob- 



ably explain- why some people felt 
that Westinghouse was crowding on 
too many commercials or complained 
that they weren't evenly spaced."' I The 
latter complaint was voiced by one of 
tlie Democratic monitors, i 

The sponsors made few changes in 
their commercials between the CO. P. 
and Democratic conventions. All felt 
that, execpt for minor technical details, 
they were on the right track. Philco 
armed themselves with additional com- 
mercials so they could be prepared in 
the event that the Democratic conven- 
tion dragged. Westinghouse was ready 
with new introduction gimmicks for 
Miss Furness but made no changes in 
the body of her commercials. 

Baird explained that the new intro- 
ductions for the Furness sales talks 
were used primarily to avoid an abrupt 
switch from convention to commercial 
since a sudden appliance pitch might 
jar and annoy the listener. There were 
some introductions used during the 
CO. P. convention but not enough, it 
was felt. The new introductions usu- 
ally made some friendly reference to 
the weather or included a remark or 
two about what was happening on the 
convention floor. The lack of transi- 
tion from convention to commercial 
was noted by the Democratic monitors 
as well as a number of admen. 

The problem of providing flexibility 
in the length of commercials (so as to 
avoid an unwanted sales harangue 
when something important was going 
on I was fortuitously solved bv Ad- 
miral, due to the following circum- 
stances: The appliance firm, which 
has a reputation for being fast on its 
feet, approached the convention with 
its merchandising plans in a state of 
flux. It was decided to school the an- 
nouncers in the whys and wherefores 
of Admiral and then let them ad lib. 




28 JULY 1952 



65 



WSYR's Local 

Radio Sales 

UP 39% 

For the period ending April 30. 
WSYR's local radio sales were 
39'; ahead of 1951. The local 
advertisers responsible for this 
increase are in the best position 
to test the effectiveness of all me- 
dia. They know which advertising 
keeps the cash registers ringing. 

One Important Reason . . . 

In Syracuse 

TV Supplements 

Radio 

Has Not 



Replaced It 

Even though Syracuse is a tvvo- 
TV-station city - even though 
71% of the homes in the Syra- 
cuse area have TV sets — radio in 
Syracuse is very much alive and 
kicking. Two separate surveys of 
television homes show 2.4 radios 
per TV home, with 61 radio re- 
ceivers purchased after the homes 
had TV. Combined radio-listen- 
ing and TV-viewing in these 
homes total an average of 7.59 
hours a dav. Compared with non- 
TV homes — 

Radio Listening 

Average Hours per Day 

In TV homes 3.07 hours 

In non-TV homes .... 4.52 hours 

National Sp ot 
Advertisers 

TAKE NOTE! 

Write, Wire, Phone 
or Ask Headlcy-Reed 




ACUSE 



570 KC 

NBC Affiliate 
WSYR— AM— FM— TV 

The Only Complete Broadcast 

Institution in Central New York 



The announcers were immersed in 
the Admiral story for three days, by 
which time they could rattle off a com- 
mercial at the drop of a hat. More im- 
portant, they could give a sales talk 
ranging from five seconds to five min- 
utes. This meant, for example, that if 
a short commercial was called for be- 
cause of convention doings, it could be 
turned out without making any com- 
plicated plans beforehand. All of Ad- 
miral's live commercials (half of the 
total number of commercials) went out 
over TV ad lib. 

Many of the convention commercials 
were thrown into the breach during 
gavel-rapping, the theory being that it 
was a tough problem to call to order 
the boisterous conventioneers. This 
theory didn't always work out too well, 
however, because the delegates would 
sometimes quiet down suddenly and 
the chairman would make an impor- 
tant announcement while the commer- 
cial was still going on. The sponsors 
had methods of cutting short a com- 
mercial but they didn't always work 
smoothly. 

In defending themselves against 
some of the criticism relating to badly- 
spotted commercials, unevenly spaced 
commercials, etc. the sponsors often 
pleaded inexperience. "After all." one 
of the appliance spokesmen said, "we 
were working with something new and 
untried and we were also faced with 
the problem that we couldn't always 
predict what was going to happen. It 
was no easy job and I'm sure glad that 
it's over. We learned a lot and we can 
do better now." 

One of the more common criticisms 
by admen was that the convention 
called for something special in the way 
of commercials. It was intimated, even 
among those who said the commercials 
were effective, that advertising was on 
trial during the convention, that the 
audience expected the commercial to 
reflect the importance of what was go- 
ing on in Chicago. This was by no 
means a universal feeling, but it 
cropped up in the SPONSOR survey often 
enough to suggest that some oppor- 
tunities were missed and that a crea- 
tive flavor was lacking in the adver- 
tising. 

To give an idea of how admen felt 
about the over-all convention advertis- 
ing picture, here are some quoted 
opinions: 

The president of a top-10 advertising 
agency: "I think the impact of the 
convention advertising was terrific be- 



TOP 



HOOPER 



Biff Collie on "Collie's Corral" 

12:45-1:00 PM Segment — 

Mon.-Sat. 

KNUZ 2.5 

Net. "A" 1.5 

Net. "B" 1.0 

Net. "C" 2.0 

Net. "D" 0.2 

Ind. "A" 0.7 

Ind. "B" 1.2 

Ind. "C" 0.7 
April, 1952 Hooper 



COST PER WEEK 
CTalent&Time — 52-Wk. Basis) 
Mon.-Sat. — $162.00 
Mon.-Fri. — $135.00 




ui FORM 
Dave Morris 

Cenerai Manager 

., KE-2581 




HOUSTON'S LEADING INDEPENDENT 



66 



SPONSOR 



cause of the size of the audience, the 
long period of listening and the fre- 
quency of the commercials. However, 
I thought the commercials were ordi- 
nary and even monotonous at times. A 
little variety would have helped an 
awful lot. It looked like there wasn't 
too much planning, although there ac- 
tually had been. There should have 
been more of an institutional approach. 
The appliance people could have tied 
in their advertising with history and 
the development of American tech- 
nology." 

The advertising manager of a large 
appliance manufacturing firm (not one 
of the sponsors) : "I thought the spon- 
sors did a pretty good job. I didn't 
find the commercials intruded in any 
way. Betty Furness was O.K. but it 
was the standard Studio One stuff. One 
of the important questions to me is 
whether the average viewer or listener 
remained up late. I took a private poll 
and found out that most people did." 

An account executive with an agen- 
cy that has a large appliance account: 
"The commercials didn't take the mood 
of the listener or viewer into account. 
The radio-TV audience was excited by 
the convention and the commercials 
should reflect this in some way. I was 
a little too conscious of that rotating 
Philco chassis, although I think that 
the Philco idea of making one sales 
point and mentioning the name — and 
no more — was sound. I doubt that 
Betty Furness commercials appeal to a 
man. but I believe she had a tremen- 
dous impact all in all. I didn't feel she 
was on too much and I certainly didn't 
find the commercials offensive. Com- 
mercials don't take away from the 
dignity of a convention because a con- 
vention has no dignity." 

An agency research executive who 



has been close to the problem of mak- 
ing an effective commercial: "The com- 
mercials were standard stuff but then 
again I believe they should have been 
standard stuff. The sponsors bought 
time to sell appliances and they were 
right in sticking to a straight selling 
job. I found that many of the com- 
mercials were badly spotted. The spon- 
sors should have been more careful. 1 
think a lot of listeners and viewers 
ducked the commercials by switching 
to another network. There should be 
some liaison between the sponsors so 
they can all put on commercials at the 
same time." 

The president of another well-known 
culvertising agency: "The commercials 
were a little boring and I resented the 
way some of them were spotted. If I 
was a sponsor I wouldn't sink $3 mil- 
lion into two weeks of advertising. 
That's a lot of money to get back. It 
would pay off more if the money were 
spread over a number of months." 

A well-known advertising agency 
timebuyer: "I think the commercials 
were the same old stuff. Something 
special was called for with all the ex- 
citement of the convention coming 
across so powerfully. I didn't find that 
the commercials were too frequent." 

To sum it up. the majority of those 
questioned by sponsor were favorably 
impressed by the commercial approach 
used by appliance advertisers at the 
first sponsored conventions in radio- 
TV history. It was recognized that 
agency and advertiser personnel were 
operating under tremendous pressure 
— almost as if they were attempting to 
insert commercials into a combined 
World Series game and three-ring cir- 
cus. The wonder was, most felt, that 
there weren't more boners and poor 
ad breaks. * * * 



510 MADISON 

(Continued from page 8) 

very highly on the nice things you said 
about us. It was certainly swell of you 
to include us among the more alert 
TV agencies in the country. 
Lowe Runkle 
Lowe Runkle Company 
Oklahoma City 



RADIOS CAS WAR 

Congratulations on your excellent 
article, "Radio's Gasoline War." The 
article and the accompanying editorial 
certainly represent exactly the type of 
frank, straight thinking which this sit- 
uation demands. 

Robert D. Swezey 
WDSU, New Orleans 



My compliments on your article 
about price wars in the broadcast me- 
dia. It couldn't come at a better time 
and I hope you mailed tear sheets to 
every advertiser, agency, station man- 
ager, station representative and pro- 
gram packager in the industry — that is 
to those few who don't happen to be 
subscribers to SPONSOR! 

Don Kearney 
ABC, N. Y. 



ANOTHER WRICLEY 

Upon reading your article on page 
21 of your June 2nd issue entitled "The 
Chlorophyll Revolution," we feel sure 
you must be confused by the name 
Wrigley on a toothpaste made by a 
company other than ours, and inas- 
much as we are deeplv interested in 
maintaining both the quality reputation 




28 JULY 1952 



67 




Same old story 
in Rochester . . . 

WHEC WAY 
OUT AHEAD! 

Consistent audience rating 
leader since 1943. 

WHEC 



ROCHESTER, N.Y./// 
5,000 WATTS \ 

ftprtitntativt ... 
IVERITT-McKINNIY, Inc., N.w York. Chic 
LEE r. O'CONNEU CO., Lei Angel. i, San Franc 



^Jne VJnlu 

COMPLETE BROADCASTING 
INSTITUTION IN 






f\ichmond 

WMBG- 
W C D -" 
W T V R > 



First Stations of Virginia 

WTVR Blair TV Inc. 
WMB6 The Boiling Co. 



of our product and the distinctiveness 
of the name with which it has long 
been associated throughout the world, 
we would appreciate your sending us 
any information you have which led 
to the reference, apparently, to our 
company in the article. 

We want to say here and now that 
the Win. Wrigley Jr. Company doesn't 
manufacture or sell toothpaste, and has 
never made or sold such a product. 
Our only product is Chewing Gum. 

H. L. Webstkr 

R m. Wrigley Jr. Company 



• It was not in. 1. 1, i I. ..i in the article that the 
"Wrigley's Spearmint Chlorophyll Creen Tooth- 
paste" referretl to is manufactured and distrib- 
uted by Wrigley Sales Corp., of New York, whieh 
has no conneetion with the William Wrigley Jr. 
Company. 



MACK 



RADIO RESULTS 

I am compiling a brochure for sales 
presentations and find that you 1952 
Radio Results has some wonderful suc- 
• r-,> stories which I would like to clip- 
mount and include in my booklet. 

However, our station has but one 
copy and I would like to order two 
more copies for my own use. Would 
you kindly send me two copies and 
the charges as soon as convenient. 

Sid Collins, Sales Dept. 
WIBC, Indianapolis 



• The above is one of the many uses SPONSOR 
readers are making of RADIO RESULTS. Copies 
of RADIO RESULTS 1952, and TV RESULTS 
1952, are included with every subscription to 
SPONSOR. Additional copies are available at low 
quantity rates. Write to SPONSOR SERVICES. 
510 Madison Ave.. New York 22. for full details 
on costs. 



WILSON COMMERCIALS 

On page 42 of your 2 June issue you 
have referred to some Wilson & Co. 
Hickory Smoked Mor television spots 
as having been prepared under the su- 
pervision of Davis and Co. Advertis- 
ing Agency, Los Angeles. 

These spots were developed by this 
company and John Sutherland Produc- 
tions. Inc. 

A. J. Engelhardt 

Ewell & Thurber Associates 

Chicago 



• Our apologies to reader Englehardt for in- 
correctly crediting tin- TV spots developed bj his 
agency and John Sutherland Productions. We are 
happy to have this opportunity to make such cor- 
rections. Letter- commenting on articles or sug- 
gesting corrections are welcomed b> the editors. 




5000 WATTS 



JOHN E. PEARSON CO. 
National Representatives 



NEWS on 
KMBC-KFRM 

is TOPS... 

...because KMBC-KFRM 
stays on 'top' of the NEWS! 




68 



And there is no greater value today 
than radio news ! 

KMBC - KFRM news programs are the 
most-listened-to newscasts in the heart 
of America. They enjoy their high rat- 
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KFRM News Department. 

Here is a tremendous sales potential in 
one of the nation's richest markets. . .the 
great Kansas City Primary trade area. 

Call KMBC-KFRM or ask your nearest 
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SPONSOR 



FILM VS. LIVE 

(Continued from page 20) 

tiser's white-haired boy. If he owns 
the shows or has a financial interest in 
it, he assures himself of a program 
stockpile that's like money in the hank 
in many ways. His ability to repeat 
his shows on the air automatically re- 
duces the long-range cost of his pro- 
graming. He amortizes his program 
cost with each additional broadcast of 
the same film so that he keeps reducing 
the cost factor the longer he's on the 
air. Then again the investor stands to 
make a profit with the film after he's 
through with it by selling the subse- 
quent runs to other advertisers. If the 
advertiser is just leasing the show from 
the producer and he's not interested in 
reruns, he's still at an advantage with 
a film series since the price to him is 
as a rule much less than he would have 
to pay for a live show of equal quality. 

6. A show in the can frees the ad- 
vertiser and the agency from the fear 
of an "act of God" befalling an impor- 
tant member of the cast. 

7. TV, when reduced to its essen- 
tials, is after all a combination of pic- 
tures and sound; so why discriminate 
against a product (film) which made 
Hollywood one of the world's largest 
and most successful industries? 

Following are some of the points 
advanced by those who look on the 
film trend with either concern, disdain 
or skepticism: 

1. The broadcast quality of live 
shows is superior. 

2. The film show cannot match the 
feeling of immediacy which the live 
show gives the audience. Also the fact 
that there's an audience watching them 
at the moment creates an air of spon- 
taneity among the cast of a live show 



that cannot be duplicated on film. 

3. A live show can cash in on a topi- 
cal subject with several days' prepara- 
tion while the sponsor of a filmed se- 
ries is shackled by what he has in the 
can. 

4. The advertisers who are making 
capital investments in their film could 
be harboring exaggerated ideas of the 
future value of their product. The hun- 
dreds of stations that are expected to 
come into the medium in the next few 
years may be pictured at the moment 
as maws hungry for any sort of pro- 
graming. But what assurance have 
these advertisers that quality levels and 
available product won't be increased to 
the point where competition will make 
it tough to recoup the balance of their 
investments? 

6. As for the rerun angle, this could 
prove the biggest delusion and snare of 
them all. Didn't Blatz Beer, despite 
good ratings and a gratifying cost-per- 
1,000, drop its rerun policy after 13 
weeks because it found that it was an- 
tagonizing viewers, not to mention 
dealers? Then again, the cost of re- 
runs may not turn out to be as attrac- 
tive as anticipated now that the Holly- 
wood unions have already started to 
move in for their share of the rerun 
take. 

7. Advertisers are going film too 
fast to set at rest the suspicion that the 
decisions lack the sober analysis and 
long-range treatment that the same ad- 
vertisers accord to the debut of a new 
product. There's a good prospect of 
lots of burned fingers. 

Regardless of the strength of the 
anti-film position, the experiences ol 
the business and the dominant thinking 
among important advertisers indicate 
that film is assured of an important 
role in TV. P & G. for instance, came 



out generously well with its flier into 
film production via Fireside Theatre. 
It is now so deeply committed to film 
that its production tab for three on-film 
shows. Beulah, Fireside Theatre and 
The Doctor, will add up to around 
$2,225,000 for the 1952-53 season. 
Lever Bros, is also in heavily. It 
financed Big Towns conversion to film 
and the sale of the series to advertisers 
outside the Lever-selected markets has 
so far been quite gratifying. 

Here's how the sponsor-investment 
facet of the business operates. 

In the case of P & G, the negatives 
of Beulah, Fireside and Doctor are 
owned outright by the soap manufac- 
turer, which pays a royalty onlj foi 
the use of the Beulah title. P & G farms 
out making of the films to Hollywood 
producers but the latter do not share 
in the subsequent-run proceeds. That's 
left to a separate deal worked out with 
a syndicator. 

Under the Lever Bros, type of invest- 
ment deal, the advertiser goes a step 
beyond putting up a major portion of 
ihe wherewithal for the production. 
The client here makes the producers of 
the film a participating partner in the 
residual, or rerun, rights. To be spe- 
cific, Big Town's film production is 
budgeted at $24,000. Jack Gross and 
Phil Krasna are the producers. 

There are several contract formulas 
between network advertisers and pro- 
ducers who own dramatic shows out- 
right, but the formula mostly in vogue 
is the one contained in the deal be- 
tween General Foods and CBS for Our 
Miss Brooks (see chart on page 21). 
Under this formula the sponsor agrees 
to use an increasing number of repeat 
show with each successive year of the 
contract. What producers consider the 
best deal for them is that calling for 




28 JULY 1952 



69 



52 uses a \ ear. \\ ith 39 of them new 
productions and 13 of the schedule re- 
peats. 

Blatz Beer entered into such a for- 
mula via its contract with CBS for 
Amos 'n Andy but abandoned the re- 
peat idea after 13 weeks of it. Blatz's 
retreat from reruns ( which will be 
dealt with in detail in subsequent para- 
graphs ) didn't meet with huzzahs from 
the network's film investment quarter. 

Under the original arrangement, 
CBS was barred from selling A & A 
for third runs until Blatz terminated 
its association with the series. With 
second runs completely out and Blatz 
content to use but 26 new pictures a 
year on an every-other-week basis for 
the next two years. CBS finds itself 
deeper in the hole than ever on the 
Amos n Andy film venture. 

With this and other film properties 
CBS, it is estimated, has already about 
$3,000,000 tied up in film investments. 
Its other financing ventures in that 
field involved / Love Lucy, Our Miss 
Brooks. Gene Autry and Burns and 
Allen. In each instance the network 
anticipates a very long wait for the full 
return of its capital outlay, since all 
deals are exclusive with the sponsor 
and the residual rights remain frozen 
while the show is on the network. 

NBC's film financing operations at 
the moment are nothing as extended as 
CBS'. It is expected that with Robert 
Sarnoff heading up NBC's film division 
there will be more activity in that di- 
rection. NBC has a co-financin« ar- 



rangement on the film version of Drag- 
net and somewhat similiar participa- 
tion in Dangerous Assignment. ABC 
would become part of the underwriting 
setup for Ozzie & Harriet when the 
series finds a buyer. 

Of the program transitions from ra- 
dio to TV-film DuPont s Cavalcade of 
America appears headed for the desig- 
nation of "most expensive." The job 
of putting this one on film will be split 
up between Screen Gems ( Columbia 
Pictures Corp. ) and Jack Shertock, a 
Hollywood pioneer in TV film, with 
the budget per show expected to exceed 
$40,000. There will be no reruns on 
this series. 

In the controversy over whether the 
rush to film is economically sound, the 
topic that gets the greatest play from 
contenders has to do with repeats by 
the network advertiser. The opposition 
will invariably cite in support of the 
argument against the repeat idea the 
experience of Blatz Beer with the Amos 
'li Andy show. To the anti-film camp 
this has taken on the aura of a classic 
case. 

What are the facts of this experi- 



ence? In terms of ratings 



chart 



on page 21 1 and cost-per-1.000 the 
repeat idea proved quite rewarding, 
but from the viewpoint of "audience 
attitude" I which, incidentally. Ben 
Duffy, BBDO president, points up in 
a comment about reruns on page 46) 
the results were not so happy. During 
the first three months of reruns Amos 
V Andy garnered, according to ARB, 




a composite rating and share-of-audi- 
ence that compared very favorably 
with the composite rating and share-of- 
audience of the preceding months of 
new films. Nielsen ratings for the "re- 
peat" month of February gave the show 
a record 38.8 and a share-of-audience 
which was but 1.7 below the peak 
(55.3i. 

Blatz had no complaints about the 
way that the repeats were faring on 
the audience-collecting level, but it 
didn't like the flow of complaints about 
repeats from letter-writing viewers, 
dealers and salesman. Faced with 
something it could weigh — ratings — 
and an intangible it couldn't weigh — 
the extent of annoyance among poten- 
tial consumers — the sponsor elected to 
shelve his repeat policy altogether. The 
letters of complaint amounted to about 
1.000. Another factor that disturbed 
the sponsor was the refusal of about 
10 stations, practically all of them in 
one-station markets, to run the repeats. 
Among them was the brewer's sole 
hometown outlet^ WTMJ-TV, Milwau- 
kee. 

At the William H. Weintraub agen- 
cy, which handles the Blatz account, 
the feeling prevails that on the dollars- 
and-cents side the repeat idea proved 



CKNW leads all day saijs KLLJOTT-HAYNES latest car 
radio survey in high-spending Greater Vancouver. 



D0THAN, ALABAMA 



5000/560 

NON-DI RECTION AL 



■I Representative I Southeast 
Stars anil Ayer I Dora-Clayton Agency 



Going to Hollywood? 
Want to see television 
production facilities that 
you have been dreaming 
about? 

. . . Just drop in on the 
new Telepix building . 

ythft 

1515 N. Western Ave., Hollywood 
155 E Ohio Street. Chieaeo 



70 



SPONSOR 



even stronger than had been antici- 
pated. It was a risk and it succeeded. 
But the agency probably never an- 
ticipated that the opposition from 
stations would be just as marked as 
from viewers. In these days of limited 
outlets it is easy to make up for dis- 
gruntled viewers, but, as the agency 
found out. making up for lost stations 
is a frustrating task. 

Here's the Hollywood union com- 
plication which is cited by the anti- 
film element in the ad fraternity as a 
looming threat to what they term the 
"rerun fallacy" : 

1. James C. Petrillo. AFM presi- 
dent, has repeatedly rejected all pleas 
from TV film producers that he modify 
his rule imposing a 5% fee for the 
union on the gross production cost of 
a program. 

2. The Screen Actors Guild has just 
issued to Hollywood producers the 
terms of compensation for its members 
who appear in TV films that are re- 
peated. The terms are: 50% of mini- 
mum salary from one to three reruns; 
25% of minimum for the fifth run and 
another 25% of minimum for the sixth 
run. 

3. The Screen Directors Guild is 
reported favoring a straight formula of 
50% of salary, which would cover all 
subsequent uses. 

4. Nothing has been heard as vet 



r~Mui/jji 



ft* 




£ 4 Reasons Why 



The foremost' national and local ad- 
vertisers use WEVD year after 
year to reach the vast 

Jewish Market 
of Metropolitan New York 

I. Top adult programming 
2. Strong audience impact 
3. Inherent listener loyalty 
4. Potential buying power 
Send for a copy of 
"WHO'S WHO ON WEVD" 
HENRY GREENFIELD 

Managing Director 

WEVD 117-119 West 46th St., 

New York 19 




by producers on rerun compensation 
from the Screen Writers Guild, but the 
anticipation is keen. 

5. Service factions, such as the 
stagehands union, are expected in due 
time to take a leaf out of Petrillo's 
handbook and have something to say 
about a similar "royalty" arrangement. 

As sharp as is the swing toward film, 
the networks this fall will still have a 
sturdy representation of live half-hour 
dramatic shows. (A list of live vs. film 
dramatic fare, plus a boxscore is car- 
ried on page 20) . Even the most ardent 
advocate of film will admit that the 
current rush cant be construed as fore- 
shadowing the death knell of the live 
dramatic program. 

Live dramatic programs still make 
up almost half of the total of network 
shows of the type. It is conceivable 
that before the fall season opens un- 
foreseen complications may delay plans 
of some clients to go film and the total 
of live shows will regain its edge over 
film. Moreover, as the season pro- 
gresses some clients may move back to 
a live basis if expected film advantages 
turn sour. 

Some of the staunchest advocates of 
live programing maintain that ratings 
will be the deciding factor. They point 
out that the current trend to film rep- 
resents, in large part, follow-the-leader 
thinking based on the success of / Love 
Lucy. Therefore, they argue, should 
film shows fail to maintain rating su- 
premacy over comparable groups of 
live shows, the trend may reverse it- 
self quickly. 

Others among the anti-film faction 
regard the lengthening shadow of 
unions over the film rerun picture as 
the factor most likely to reverse the 
trend to film. As detailed above, the 
unions have taken the attitude that ex- 
tra use of film shows demands extra 
compensation. In such a situation there 
is always the fear that initial demands 
of the unions will turn out to be but 
the beginning. 

A subject which a few astute agency- 
men brought up was the future of the 
networks if film becomes the backbone 
of programing. These students of the 
business wondered whether the net- 
works weren't treading on dangerous 
ground in backing film. They felt sta- 
tions might tend to feel networks were 
no longer vital to them if the source of 
programing was a film can. * * * 



lirlflo 



SAN DIEGO'S 

TV STATION 

4l**t6et<i, CALIF'S. 
THIRD MARKET 



Wise Buyers Buy 
KFMB-TV, AM 

TV - CHANNEL - 8, AM - 550 K. C. 

KFMB • 5th and Ash, San Diego I, Calif. 

John A. Kennedy, Board Chairman 
Howard L. Chernoff, Gen. Mgr. 




28 JULY 1952 



71 



NEGRO MARKET 

{Continued from page 30) 

white counterpart. The 1950 U. S. Cen- 
sus lists S3, 135 as the median income 
for white families and individuals; for 
Negroes, the figure is $1,569. How- 
ever, three major trends are at work 
here. First, the median increase for 
white incomes. 1940-1950, was 146%; 
for Negroes it was 192%. Secondly, 
the fact that nearly 6.000.000 Negroes 
are still "rural" population tended to 
pull down the over-all averages for Ne- 
gro income. Thirdly, the population 
shift is strongly away from rural com- 
munities to urban centers. To advertis- 
ers, this means that the country's Ne- 
gro population is gradually acquiring 
better disposable incomes, and is spend- 
ing it more and more in urban areas. 
3. Employment — The general level 
of Negro employment, and job oppor- 
tunities for him, are growing better. 



******** 

"Let's aoept the faet that daytime radio 
is a hearty, lusty, solid advertising me- 
dium. The national bills for daytime 
radio are being paid by some of the 
sharpest national advertisers in the 
countrv." 

J. S. STOLZOFF 

Account Executive 

Foote, Cone & Brlding 

******** 



Of the total civilian labor force of 
some 6,000,000 Negroes, better than 
91.5% are employed. This compares 
closely with the figure for whites, which 
runs around 94.7%. Negroes hold all 
kinds of jobs, from laborers on up the 
line to top professionals. And, between 
1940 and 1950, there was a significant 
decline in the proportion of Negro 
workers engaged in farming and do- 
mestic service (41% and 29% less, re- 
spectively) with a corresponding in- 
crease in the proportion of Negroes em- 
ployed in professional, skilled, clerical 
and other more profitable occupations. 
4. Education — Schooling is a key 
factor in raising incomes and the gen- 
eral standard of living, and the Negro 
gets a better educational opportunity 
today than he did a decade ago. In the 
past 10 years, school enrollment in the 
U. S. as a whole has gone up some 
6.1%; for non-whites the rise has been 
some 17.2%. By age groups, the sharp- 
est increase has been in the 18-24-year- 
old category, which for Negroes has 
increased nearly 60% while the U. S. 
i Pletue turn to page 76) 



HERE THE/ ARE I 




+ 



SOUTHERN SALES APPEAL 
SOUTHERN SALES APPROACH 



In the deep South, the Negro market CAN NOT be overlooked. Negroes 
have a tremendous buying power which is steadily increasing. Many areas 
in the South have a Negro population far in excess of the white population. 
Skillful programming to this vital group keeps em tuned to their favorite — 
The Family Station! 

Southern farmers are in clover these days, enjoying greatly increased incomes 
and they are eager to spend them! Radio is the farmer's chief entertainment, 
and we beam selected blocks of musical and informative programs to him. 
The mail response proves that The Family Station is first in farmland! 

In the heart of the Bible Belt there's a great and influential segment of honest, 
hard-working, Cod-fearing Southerners who prefer religious programs ANY day 
in the week. The Family Station fills their need for inspirational messages by 
scheduling program after program of local preachers, religious groups and 
religious music. 

THE FAMILY FOUR, in addition to their rich concentrated primary markets 
in Ceorgia, Arkansas and Tennessee, deliver tremendous bonus audiences in 
the states of South and North Carolina, Florida and Mississippi. With THE 
FAMILY FOUR your SSA ; is positively assured. 



CALL YOUR NEAREST FORJOE AGENCY 

OR 
STARS INC. ATLANTA, GEORGIA 



72 



SPONSOR 



THESE STARS 
SHINE IN PIXIE 




t oo« «*«* 



ooo 






***" 




THE FAMILY FOUR 

SELL MORE BECAUSE 

THEY GO HOME TO MORE 

THAN 5 MILLION SOUTHERNERS 



Cross-section of stations which have 
programing beamed at Negroes 

This is by no means a complete listing. More stations join the total monthly 



Proportion of IMegro programing on stations below designated bg code: 
7 all Negro programing 2 about half Negro programing 3 substantial Negro programing 



Alabama 



WBCO Bessemer- 

WJLD Bessemer 1 

WEDR Birmingham- 

WLBS Birmingham'' 1 

WHOS Decatur* 

WMFT Florence 

WKAB Mobile* 

WMGY Montgomery- 



Arizona 



KGPH 



Flagstaff* 



Arkansas 



KVLC Little Rock* 

KXLR Little Rock- 



California 



KGST Fresno* 

KWBR Oakland 

KWKW Pasadena* 

KCSB San Bernardino'* 

KWBR Oakland 

KOWL Santa Monica* 



Colorado 



KTLN .... Denver! 

KMYR Denver 2 



Delaware 



WTUX Wilmington 



Florida 



WNDB Daytona Beach* 

WROD Daytona Beach 3 

WINX Ho//ywood' 

WIVY Jacksonville 2 

WOBS Jacksonville 

WFEC Miami- 

WINZ Miami* 

WMIE Miami* 

WTNT ..Tallahassee* 

WALT Tampa* 

WEBC Tampa-* 



Georgia 



WRFC Athens* 

WERD Atlanta^ 

WBBQ _ Augusta 

WGBA .... Columbus* 

WEAS Decatur 2 

WIBB Macon- 

WROM Rome- 

WCCP Savannah'* 

WJIV Savannah 2 

WGOV Valdosta* 



Illinois 



WEDC Chicago 2 

WGES Chicago* 

WSBC Chicago* 

WTMV East St. Louis* 



Indiana 



wwca Gory- 



Kansas 



KJAY Topeka 

kwbb .. Wichita- 



Kentucky 



WKLX Lexington' 

WLEX Lexington- 

WLOU Louisville* 



Louisiana 



WIBR Baton Rouge 

KAOK Lake Charles 2 

KWSL Lake Charles 2 

WBOK New Orleans 2 

WJMR New Orleans* 

WNOE New Orleans 

WWEZ New Orleans 

KCIJ Shreveport* 

KENT Shreveport' 



Maryland 



WITH Baltimore* 

WSID Baltimore* 

WWiN _._ Baltimore* 

Massachusetts 

WBMS Boston* 



Michigan 

WJLB 

Mississippi 



WJLB Detroit 



WGVM Greenville* 

WJXN __ Jackson- 



Missouri 



KIMO Independence* 

KSTL St. Louis 

KXLW St. Louis 



New Jersey 



WMID Atlantic City 
WAAT .. Newark 



New York 



WHOM New York 

WLIB New Yorfc- 

WWRL New York- 



North Carolina 



WSKY Asheville* 

WGIV Charlotte 2 

WGTC Greenvi//e< 

WGBG Greensboro* 

WTIK Durham* 

WFNC Fayetteville* 

WJNC Jacksonville 

WHIT New Bern* 

WRAL Raleigh* 

WCEC Rocfey Mount 

WCPS Tarboro- 

WGNI Wilmington* 



WGTM Wilson* 

WAAA Winston-Salem* 



Ohio 



WNOP _.. Cincinnati* 

WSAI Cincinnati 

WDOK .... .develand- 

WSBS Cleveland* 

WVKO Columbus 

WBBW Youngstown* 



Oklahoma 



KBYE Oklahoma City- 

KTOW Oklahoma City* 

KFMJ Tulsa 

Pennsylvania 

WDAS . Philadelphia* 

WHAT Philadelphia* 

WHOD Pittsburgh* 

WPIT Pittsburgh 



South Carolina 



WAIM Anderson* 

WACA Camden 

WPAL Charleston- 

WNOK Columbia* 

WJMX Florence* 

WESC _. Greenvi7/e- 

WAKE Greenvii/e^ 



Tennesee 



WDXB Chattanooga* 

WMFS Chattanooga- 

WOBS Chottonoogo- 

Wl BK Knoxville* 

WKGN Knoxville* 

WDIA Memphis 1 

WHBQ Memphis-* 

WHHM Memphis* 

WSOK Nashville* 



Texas 



KVET Austin* 

KPBX Beaumont* 

KTRM Beaumont- 

KSKY _ Dallas- 

KXOL Fort Worth- 

KGBC — Galveston- 

KNUZ Houston' 

KONO San Antonio* 



Virginia 



WDVA Danville* 

WLOW ..... Norfolk 2 

WANT Richmond* 

WLEE Richmond* 

WXGI Richmond* 

Washington, D. C. 

WOOK Woshington 1 

WUST Woshington 1 

WWDC Washington* 

West Virginia 

WTIP Charleston* 



74 



SPONSOR 



\6uve found if J 




: Ulhat?- 




Good Luck -and 
Good buying action 

will be yours with this four leaf clover 
in your broadcast schedule. WERD 
stimulates sales. And it's the most 
economical radio buy in Atlanta. 
Remember, there's a lucrative market to 
be tapped. It's yours through WERD! 




Your luckiest "find" in radio — 
WERD t Atlanta! It's your 
"direct wire" to Atlanta's great 
Negro audience, and to its 
vast — but scarcely 
tapped — buying power. 



Why?- 



WERD listeners have confidence in 
what they hear on their station— the only 
Negro owned and operated radio station 
in the U.S. Their confidence shows where 
it counts most -at the sales counter, 
where they buy the products they 
hear about on WERD. Write for WERD's 
"Proof of Performance." 




RADIO DIVISION 

Interstate United Newspapers, Inc. 

Represented nationally by 

joe uioonon 

28 JULY 1952 




ATLANTA 

1000 WATTS • 860 ON EVERY ATLANTA DIAL 
J. B. Blayton, Jr., Gen. M gr 



75 



NEGRO MARKET 

l Continued from page 72) 

increase has been about 337c Since 
the end of the last war, the number of 
Negro youths who have received a high 
school or college education has jumped 
sharply. 

5. Migration — The American Negro 
population, many vears ago. was large - 
1\ confined to the South, where it rep- 
resented a poorly-paid agricultural la- 
bor force. Today, huge changes have 
been made that are of great importance 
to advertisers. Some two-thirds of 
American Negroes still live in the 
South, but the Negro population be- 
low the Mason-Dixon line is declining 
in relation to whites. In the Northeast, 
Midwest, and Western U. S.. this ratio 
is running just the reverse; it's rising. 
Negroes are migrating, in a steady- 
stream from rural areas to urban areas, 
where 617 of them now live. From 
farms in the South, they are seeking 
better-paying jobs in the big cities of 
the South ; and, from cities below the 
Mason-Dixon line, they are moving 
northward to cities like New York. 
Philadelphia. Detroit and Los Angeles. 
In the Northeast U. S.. with the excep- 
tion of a few areas, Negro population 
is growing twice as fast as white pop- 
ulation. 

6. Home ownership - The home 
owner, as any adman knows, is one of 
the prime targets for advertising. He 
is in effect a "purchasing agent." both 
for his family consumption needs and 
for the maintenance and improvement 
of his home. Today, in urban areas, 
one Negro family out of every three 
owns its own home, despite the over- 
crowded "slum" conditions for Ne- 
groes in some cities. Urban Negro 
home ownership has increased 1297 
since 1940, while white home owner- 
ship in urban areas has increased 81 % . 
according to the Bureau of Census. 



Q. Does the Negro have a stand- 
ard of living (and a product con- 
sumption) that compares with the 
standard of living of U. S. whites? 

A. According to all the market re- 
search available on the subject, he does 

and he doesn't. It's in the variations 
from the all-U. S. patterns that adver- 
tisers have found a gold mine, or have 
wasted their sales efforts. 

An expert on Negro media, who has 
in extensive background in sociology. 
told sponsor: 



"The American Negro is immediate- 
ly resentful of anything or anyone who 
doesn't treat him as an individual or 
who treats him unfairly. At the same 
time — despite the fact that his average 
income is often lower than that of the 
average white man — there runs a 
strong current feeling that he's just as 
good as the average white. But, since 
the white man discriminates against 
the Negro, the result is a form of 'in- 
security neurosis' in which the Negro 
tries to prove his equality. 

"That sounds pretty fancy, but it 
isn't. In terms of what happens in re- 
tail stores and dealers, this 'insecurity 
neurosis' is pretty important. For in- 
stance, Negroes are denied many rec- 
reations in many parts of the country 
that whites take for granted. I mean 
access to theatres, restaurants, night- 
clubs, beaches, vacation resorts, travel 
facilities and the like. 

"As a result. Southern Negroes can 
he considered largely as having that 
much more money to spend on non- 
recreational items. Even in Northern. 
Midwestern and Pacific areas where the 
discrimination is much less than in the 
South, this is true to quite an extent. 

"The Negro, therefore, will spend 
much more money on food, clothing, 
appliances, automobiles and other 
items in order to help overcome his 'in- 
security neurosis.' The results has been 
that Negro standards of living, in many 
categories of goods, are a match for 
white standards. When matched on an 
income level, the Negro standards are 
often higher, particularly where it con- 
cerns something he can wear, use him- 
self or consume personally." 



Q. What does the desire on the 
part of U. S. Negroes to prove that 
they are "just as good as anyone 
else" mean to an advertiser? 

A. Simply this. The Negro market is 
often underrated by advertisers, who 
steer their course by Census figures 
which show Negro median incomes to 
be about half that of white families, 
and by a feeling that they reach the 
Negro market completely with their 
normal advertising expenditures. 

But, despite the fact that the Negro 
is generally considered as belonging to 
a low-income or middle-income group, 
his expenditures do not rank as "typi- 
cal" of this class. He has had so much 
shoddy merchandise and second-rate 
stuff passed off on him in the past that 



he demands only the best of nationally- 
advertised and Negro-media-advertised 
brands today. Frequently, he will do 
without certain "white" luxuries (trav- 
el, nightclubbing. etc. I in order to ac- 
quire other more practical luxuries that 
make him feel "equal." 

For instance, take the case of the 
cars made by the Buick division of 
General Motors. Buicks are, generally 
speaking, a car that is bought by mid- 
dle-income and upper-middle class fam- 
ilies. But, a survey among 31 Buick 
dealers not long ago revealed these re- 
sults. Some $3,092,460 worth of Buicks 
— at an average retail price of $2,600 
- — were sold to Negroes, representing 
11.4% of the total new-car sales of 
these 31 dealers during a five-month 
period. (Negroes are about 10% of 
the total U. S. poulation.) This is one 
of many clear-cut indications that Ne- 
groes buy expensive durable-goods 
items out of proportion to their over- 
all income status, and in a pattern 
which closely resembles the consumer 
spending of whites earning higher in- 
comes. 

Incidentally, in Negro families whose 
incomes are $5,000 a year and over 
recently some 27% of all Negro auto 
purchases were made. But. in Negro 
families in the $2.000-$3,000 bracket, 
some 22% of the purchases were made, 
indicating a considerable "holding up" 
of purchasing power even in the lower 
groups, according to Bureau of Cen- 
sus figures. 



Q. Why should advertisers make 
a special effort to reach the Ne- 
gro market through Negro-appeal 
media? 

A. Just as advertisers have many mis- 
conceptions surrounding the buying 
power of 15,000,000 U. S. Negroes, 
they are often deluded by what seem 
to be "normal" results in this market 
with the non-Negro advertising media. 

Since Negroes often buy anything 
from baby food to Buicks out of all 
proportion to their apparent economic 
levels, many advertisers often feel they 
are getting full coverage in the Negro 
market with non-Negro media just be- 
cause the results are comparative with 
those of low-income and middle-income 
white families. 

What's actually happening in most 
cases is that Negroes are being reached 
to a lesser degree than the advertiser 
thinks, through his regular media ad- 
vertising. But. those who are reached 



76 



SPONSOR 



" 



Buying in Pittsburgh? 



STREMGTHE 




youi sales penetration with Ini MM%jM} 
the station of nations! 



WHOD — 250m; — 860 on every Pittsburgh dial — beams programs to 
Negro'" — Slovak — Jewish — Italian — Greek — Arabic — Croatian — 
Polish — Hungarian — Lithuanian 



You've a surprise in store, if you haven't yet sold your product 

through WHOD. The Pittsburgh market is a most lucrative one, and 

the topography of the area is such that radio continues to be the 

major and most powerful selling medium. WHOD delivers beyond expectations! 



Write for WHOD Sales Case Histories and latest Pulse report. 
Here's the basic story on WHOD Negro programming— 



"Mary Dee and 
Mai Goodc 
doing their 
wake-up show" 



Represented nationally by 
JOE WOOTTON 

Radio Division 
Interstate United Newspapers, Inc. 



Radio Center, Homestead, Pa. 

Leonard Walk, Program Director 
Roy Ferree, General Manager 



Pittsburgh's only station with a considerable block 
of time devoted to Negro programming — four 
hours daily. An all-Negro staff, including talent, 
sales and office personnel, handles the Negro 
programming. 

penetrates and sells the rich Pittsburgh Negro 
Market — 60,000 spending families. Their buying 
income — $86,894,350. 1952 marks the fourth 
anniversary of WHOD's public service activity. 
Listeners show their appreciation for these "com- 
munity" announcements at sales counters. 

its sales promotion activity is so great that station 
personalities spend as much time in stores, making 
personal appearances, as in the studio. Listeners 
accept their product recommendations as "gospel." 



buy proportionate!) more, thus balanc- 
ing the picture. 

But. advertisers who have taken the 
extra step into Negro-appeal media can 
tell a different story. Results of air ad- 
vertising designed specifically for Ne- 
gro ears, and in the 150-odd Negro 
newspapers and publications which 
reach over 3.000.000 Negro readers 
each week, have shown that the intense 
loyalt) to these media pays off in sales. 

If an advertiser is wise and skillful 
in his use of Negro-appeal media, par- 
ticularly air advertising, he is likely to 
reap a reward that is entirely out of 
proportion to what he might expert. 
He is no longer merelj adding a sort 
of "supplemental" coverage to his reg- 
ular advertising. He is reaching a mar- 
ket which, more and more, looks to its 
own media for news and entertainment, 
and to the advertising in this media 
for goods on which to spend a $15.- 
I II K 1,1 )( )( ).( II II ) annually income. * * * 



RADIO FACTS 

{Continued from page 33 I 

half-hour weekly disk jockey show and 
has since boosted the total to 22 hours 
per week, reported as follows to spon- 
sor: "There are approximately 65.000 
Negroes in Charleston County, and 
with our clear-channel coverage 1 1.000 
watts on 730 k.c. ) we figure about 
300.000 in our primary area, with 
about 85'a having radios." 

Montgomery, Ala. - Tom Sewell. 
general manager of Montgomery's 
WMGY. made his own checkup recent- 
l\ on his Negro audience, stating: 
"Montgomery County is about 43*/r 
Negro, with a population of 140.000. 
In the Negro homes I have visited, both 
urban and rural, 75% or more have 
radios in their homes, and are loyal 
listeners to the programs beamed at 
them." 

Louisville, ky. — According to U. S. 
Census figures, there are about 80.000 
Negroes in the metropolitan area of 
Louisville, with a buying power of 
some $70,000,000. Some 37$ of the 
30.000 Negro families own their own 
homes. Station WLOU reported to 
SPONSOR that radio saturation here was 
about 78.5' i . 

idanta, Ga— In a special study con- 
ducted for \\ I.HI). a pioneer station in 
Negro programing. Atlanta Universitj 
reported that "there are 1.8 radios per 
IVearo home in the Atlanta area." Ac- 



cording to U. S. Census figures, there 
are nearly 175,000 Negroes and some 
50.000 Negro families in Atlanta, with 
a total annual purchasing power of 
over $100,000,000. 

Neiv Orleans — Independent station 
WBOK estimates that there are 208.000 
Negroes in New Orleans, and some 
500.000 in its listening area. The sta- 
tion was the 10th station to come on 
the air in New Orleans when it bowed 
on in February 1951. Since then, it 
has made a marked success as an "in- 
tegrated" I i.e.. part Negro, part white 
programing I station, estimates that to- 
day some 86.4$ of New Orleans fam- 
ilies own radios. 



Q. Is there any "rule of thumb" in 
determining how many Negro 
homes in an area serviced by a Ne- 
gro-appeal station have radios? 

A. On the basis of the individual sta- 
tion surveys listed above, and in dis- 
cussions with station reps, agencymen. 
media representatives and others. SPON- 
SOR suggests the following as a rough 
guide to estimating Negro radio owner- 
ship: 

1. In cities above the Mason-Dixon 
line, and in the Midwest and Pacific 
regions, radio set saturation will be be- 
tween 90$ and 98% of the Negro 
homes in the area. It's best, however, 
to check further with stations and rep- 
resentatives for individual market sta- 
tistics and for the exact percentages for 
specific areas. 

2. In cities below the Mason-Dixon 
line, throughout the South and South- 
east, radio set saturation is less, run- 
ning around 75$ to 85$ as an aver- 
age, with jumps into the high 90's for 
the principal metropolitan areas. 
Again, check closely for individual 
markets, as the figures may vary. 



Q. Are stations with Negro pro- 
graming network affiliates, or in- 
dependent outlets? 

A. Station reps estimate that more 
than nine out of 10 Negro-appeal sta- 
tions are independents, with a good 
percentage of them having come on the 
air since the end of World War II. 

Networks, and network outlets, have 
not bothered to any great extent with 
the Negro market, preferring to devel- 
op a "general family" pattern of listen- 
ing. Independent stations, on the other 
hand, have often built their successes 



on programing to fractional audiences 
with foreign language, music-and-news, 
sports, and other "specialized appeal" 
types of programing. 

The independent station, therefore, 
that airs a sizable amount of Negro- 
appeal programing is just another ex- 
ample of the non-network station that 
is building its listening by programing 
directly at a fraction of the total listen- 
ing audience. 



Q. Is television a factor in reach- 
ing the Negro market? 

A. It goes without saying that Negro 
families own and enjoy TV sets, par- 
ticularly since the trend in the U. S. 
Negro population has been toward met- 
ropolitan centers, where 61$ of them 
now live. 

Due to the large amount of in-home 
entertaining that is done in urban Ne- 
gro families, there is a corresponding 
interest in TV as one of the forms of 
home entertainment, primarily during 
evening hours. 

Purchases of TV sets by Negroes va- 
ries with income, but there has been 
considerable activity in set sales to Ne- 
groes in the low r and middle-income 
brackets. Even in 1949, when a 10- 
inch table model set would bring $295 
at retail, some 56% of the TV sets 
bought by Negroes went into homes 
where the family income was in the 
$2,000-$5,000 a year bracket, accord- 
ing to a survey made by the Federal 
Reserve System. Today, with set prices 
considerably below the 1949 levels, 
even the below-$2,000-a-year homes are 
beginning to fill up with TV. A spon- 
sor estimate of TV-equipped Negro 
homes would be about 850.000 in the 
U. S. 

However, no major TV outlet has, 
at the time sponsor went to press, de- 
cided that the time has arrived to start 
programing to the Negro as a "frac- 
tional audience." Some of the TV sta- 
tions in the largest video areas, such as 
New York. Chicago and Los Angeles, 
are talking about it, but nothing much 
has happened. 

Until there's a real competition for 
TV audiences, and until more indepen- 
dent, non-network-afliliated TV stations 
emerge, there's not likely to be much 
in the way of special Negro-appeal vid- 
eo fare. 



Q. Does the major appeal of Ne- 



78 



SPONSOR 



gro-programed stations lie in using 
Negro talent? 

A. Not necessarily, although the ma- 
jority of Negro-appeal performers who 
have found radio success are them- 
selves Negroes. Several stations pro- 
graming to the Negro market, like De- 
catur's WEAS and Savannah's WJIV, 
use white d.j.'s on their Negro disk 
shows with good results. 

The secret of success lies in some- 
thing else entirely. As Bert Ferguson, 
manager of WDIA, Memphis, put it to 
sponsor: 

"First of all, we have entertainers 
on the air who are showmen. Second- 
ly, we have put ourselves at the dis- 
posal of the Negro community in every 
way we could think of. The lack of 
this approach will cause the weakness 
or failure of many an operator who 
thinks that the key to the mint in the 
Negro market is a few blues and gospel 
records, and a Negro face at the mike."' 



Q. How does the amount of radio 
listening done in a Negro family 
compare with the amount done on 
an over-all basis? 

A. Since many avenues of entertain- 
ment are restricted or closed to Ne- 
groes, much more in-home entertain- 
ing is done, and the Negro home is 
usually a greater center of leisure time 
activities than the over-all U. S. av- 
erage. 

A typical clue to the effect of this 
on radio was furnished to sponsor by 
WDIA, Memphis, in whose coverage 
area 42.2' r of the people are Negroes. 
Reported the station: 

"In a special survey just completed, 
the results show that 93% of the Ne- 
gro homes in Memphis have a radio. 
And, 30% of these families owning 
radio have two or more sets. 

"Radio listening is an important part 
of the Negro family's day, twice as 
high as the over-all average shown by 
Hooper. The December 1951 through 
April 1952 Hooper shows average tune- 
ins to be 14.9% . whereas Negro listen- 
ing averages 32%." 

Just what this means to an advertiser 
in terms of dollars and cents can per- 
haps be judged by a few economic facts 
which relate to the following case. In 
Memphis, and in the 20 counties of the 
WDIA area, there are some 439,266 
Negroes, according to the last census. 
They have, says the station, a total ef- 
fective buying income in excess of 
$300,000,000 annually. And. although 



MIDDLE 
TENNESSEE'S 
RADIO VOICE 




100% NEGRO PROGRAMMING! 
100% NEGRO PERSONALITIES! 



MR. ADVERTISER: Would you be satisfied if you knew 
one of your salesmen was only making a 70% effort to- 
ward completing a sale? If you're overlooking the NEGRO 
segment of the city of Nashvilie's population, you're 
neglecting 30% of your prospects! 

The only sure way of making a 100% sales effort in 
Nashville is through the use of NEGRO RADIO 1 

NEGRO RADIO in Middle Tennessee is WSOK' 

WSOK is the station that began broadcasting December 
14, 1951 and ranks THIRD 1 ', month-by-month in the 
C. E. Hooper total rated share of audience time periods, 
January through April, 1952. 

When you compare rates and Hooperatings with the ether 
leading Nashville stations, you'll be convinced that WSOK 
is your best radio buy in Middle Tennessee. 

Over 110,000 NEGROES live and buy in the WSOK 0.1 
MV listening area. 

Forjoe men have fact sheets on this top station and 
market! 

* Indicating a large segment of White listeners also. 



^EE32- 



REPS 



NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 

FORJOE & CO. . . . DORA-CLAYTON (Southeast) 



28 JULY 1952 



79 







^ TOP RATED 
* NEGRO 

/ DISC JOCKEYS 

ON W#£ 

These two Negro disc jockeys, 
each with a style of his own, have 
captured the listeners in New 
Orleans. They are the most lis- 
tened to according to Hooper, ac- 
cording to personal survey and 
according to results. 

HIGHEST RATED 

For 16 consecutive quarter hours 
these Negro disc jockeys lead the 
field in New Orleans over all other 
disc jockeys. Consistently for 18 
months "Okey Dokey" has wowed 
the radio listeners with his jazz, 
jive and knocked out race music. 
"Honeyboy" has done likewise with 
his spiritual programs. 

ON HIGHEST 
RATED STATION 

WBOK is the leader. It carries 
more national advertising than all 
other six independents combined. 
It carries more local advertising 
than any two other independent 
stations. For results, WBOK is first 
in New Orleans among all inde- 
pendents. 

Write for information and proof. 
Represented by Forjoe and Company 
29 West 57th Street, New York 



y**ok 



80 



NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA 



they represent 42.2% of the total pop- 
ulation in the WDIA area, they account 
for some 39% of the department store 
sales and over 50% of the food and 
drug purchases. 

The relationship between the high 
listening and extreme loyalty of Negro 
families to Negro-appeal stations, and 
the excellent sales results of advertis- 
ers who have used this growing medi- 
um is far from accidental. And, with 
the amount of Negro-appeal program- 
ing on the increase advertisers can 
no longer overlook it in their air ad- 
vertising plans. 



Q. From the standpoint of the spot 
advertiser who may be thinking of 
building a series of Negro-appeal 
programs, either live or custom- 
transcribed, what are the main 
Negro talent and program prefer- 
ences? 

A. Learning what Negro listeners want 
has largely been a matter of trial and 
error for most stations. However, based 
on the findings of sponsor's study of 
Negro-appeal stations, the following 
pattern has emerged: 

1. Negro listeners tune to a particu- 
lar station primarily for entertainment 
they feel is slanted at them. For the 
most part, this will consist of a disk 
jockey with a strong sense of show- 
manship, and a loyal Negro following, 
who spins platters that feature Ne- 
gro artists most of the time, and white 
artists some of the time. This may be 
50% or more of the total Negro-appeal 
programing. 

2. A deeply religious race, Negroes 
look to radio stations for broadcasts 
of a spiritual nature. Most often these 
consist of live pickups from churches 
(often, 70% of the Negroes in a city 
will be church-goers) or special pro- 
grams (live or transcribed) of re- 
ligious music. 

3. Since few stations with a "gener- 
al" program formula go out of their 
way to air news of special interest to 
Negroes, much of the success of Ne- 
gro-appeal stations is based on their 
coverage of news, special events, com- 
munity events, sports events, charity 
drives and so forth that concern the 
Negro community. Such programing 
is nearly always local in origin, al- 
though there is room for a certain 
amount of such programing that tries 
to be "national" in scope. 

4. In general, Negro listeners seem 
to prefer local personalities and record- 



ed artists of their own race, although 
there are notable exceptions here and 
there. As Norman Stewart, commercial 
manager of Nashville's WSOK, stated 
recently to sponsor: 

"The only difference in the operation 
of WSOK and a predominantly white 
station is in the programing and the 
personalities. The Nashville Negro au- 
dience is aware of the fact that every 
voice they hear on this station is that 
of a Negro. This makes them have con- 
fidence in the commercials they hear, 
and is a tremendous influencing factor 
in the sale of products and services ad- 
vertised on this station." 



Q. Are there any specific studies 
of local Negro programing prefer- 
ences? 

A. As mentioned above, most stations 
have discovered their own program for- 
mula largely by "feel." 

However, a few stations have made 
their own special studies of local Ne- 
gro programing preferences. One of 
the more interesting reports in this 
field came to SPONSOR from Chattanoo- 
ga's WMFS, a Negro-appeal station 
that has done a top job of integrating 
itself with the local Negro community. 

WMFS commissioned Howard High 
School, a Negro school, to make a lis- 
tening study in January of this year. A 
total of 1,369 personal interviews were 
made among the 70,000 Negroes in 
Chattanooga. This was how they listed 
their program preferences: 

Of the total, 36% indicated as their 
first choice "Negro artists," which cov- 
ered both music and news; 24% chose 
"religious music"; 22% voted for 
"popular music regardless of the race 
of the artists"; 10% chose "religious 
programs"; 6% indicated "classical 
music"; 1% voted for "hillbilly mu- 
sic"; and the remaining 1% for "other 
programs." 

Although this study represents pro- 
gram preferences in only one Southern 
area, sponsor believes, on the basis of 
what both Northern and Southern Ne- 
gro-appeal stations have found success- 
ful, that this is a rough index of over- 
all preferences. 



Q. What can an advertiser using 
Negro-appeal radio expect in the 
way of radio research? 

A. Since Negro-appeal radio exists 
side-by-side with the older forms of 
spot radio, an advertiser aiming some 

SPONSOR 



of his air advertising directly at the 
Negro market will find that part of it 
is measured in the regular rating serv- 
ices. 

For a specific city, he can find out 
how his program rates on a "general" 
hasis in all homes (white and Negro) 
simply by looking at local Pulse or 
Hooper figures. Often, stations with 
Negro-appeal programs stack up well 
in the broad picture of broadcasting. 
WERD, for example, proudly states 
that it has "consistently ranked with 
the top 50 r /r of Atlanta stations in 
Hooper-rated audience." WBOK, thanks 
to the blend of Negro and white pro- 
graming it serves up to its New Or- 
leans audience, states that "for months 
WBOK has been the number-one sta- 
tion in the morning and afternoon 
among all six other independents. In 
the April audience index (Hooper) 
WBOK is fourth in the morning and 
third in the afternoon among all 11 
stations." 

How an advertiser who uses Negro- 
appeal programing is doing in Negro 
homes only is something else. Although 
radio saturation is relatively high 
among Negroes in the South, tele- 
phones are scarce, and are in only 25 
to 35% of Negro homes, making Hoop- 
er checks difficult. Some stations do 
their own checkups, with such surpris- 
ing results as the WNOP, Newport, 
Ky., survey which showed that "over 
85% of the Negroes in this area listen 
to our station as often as they can." 

More specific research in this field 
is being done, however. Pulse and 
Advertest have checked Negro listen- 
ing in Negro homes, and Pulse expects 
to step up its activities. Many stations, 
particularly those in large metropolitan 
areas like New York and Chicago that 
have large Negro populations, are com- 
missioning their own listening studies 
through the regular research services, 
or through Negro schools and colleges 
in the area. 

Advertisers can get a lot of answers 
to their normal research questions to- 
day; in the near future, they'll get even 
more. 

Q. Is station merchandising a ma- 
jor factor in Negro-appeal radio? 

A. Yes. Thanks to the fact that the 
average Negro-appeal outlet partici- 
pates actively and intensively in all 
phases of social, charitable, business 
and religious life in the Negro commu- 
nity, merchandising is easy and obvi- 
ous for most of them. 



Stations like WHOD, Homestead; 
WERD, Atlanta; WEAS, Decatur; 
WDIA, Memphis; WWRL and WLIB, 
New York; WBOK, New Orleans, and 
many others do an outstanding job of 
merchandising which — relatively speak- 
ing — often runs rings around general 
stations, and draws comparable sales 
results for advertisers. 

Stores in Negro areas, particularly 
the drug and food chains, have long 
been neglected in lining up merchan- 
dising stunts and displays, and most 
of them react eagerly to it, especially 



since it's a proven business-getter. Ad- 
vertisers frequently find that Negro-ap- 
peal stations have arranged special fea- 
turing, displays, window set-ups and 
the like when a campaign be; in* I" 
roll. 

In addition, the merchandising b) 
Negro-appeal outlds lias a very per- 
sonal touch. Part of the standard mer- 
chandising routines of such stations in- 
clude visits by Ne<rn> disk jockeys and 
performers to retail stores (well- 
plugged on the air) where nationalb- 
advertised products are given the "per- 



of*te„ 



f* Aro Still Ucina 



Are Still Using 



WEDR 



1000 
Watts 



28 JULY 1952 



America's First All-Negro Station 

To Sell 

250,000 Mqnes 

Spending $150,000,000 
Annually in Birmingham 

There's no doubt about it — WEDR is your best buy 
to sell the vast Negro market of Birmingham, Ala. 
All-Negro staff and talent! 100% Negro pro- 
gramming! Aggressive merchandising! 



JOSEPH HERSHEY McGILLVRA, INC. • NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 

81 




the only stalion with 
ALL-NEGRO 
programming in the 
state of Kentucky! 



• LOU belongs to Louisville's 160.000 
(plus) Negroes, for it's the only station 
programming exclusively to them with 
top Ncpro personalities. 

• LOU's audience buys ! Louisville's av- 
erage Netrro family income is almost 
$2800 yearly ... a virtually untapped 
market for smart advertisers. 

• ASK FOR LOU ! It's a strong and wel- 
come entre to Louisville's $52 million 
dollar Negro market. Ask for LOU . . . 
today ! 



2S49 SOUTH THIRD STREET 

LOUISVILLE. KY. C A. 3E80 

National Renre.<-ntativc : 

Forjw & Co. 

Southern R»-pr«*s«-ntative : 

Dora Clayton Agency 




sonal endorsement" treatment by the 
performer. Often, the station person- 
ality turns salesman, and stages public 
demonstrations of the product. So well 
has this worked that many Negro radio 
performers are featured in the local- 
level printed media advertising of spon- 
sors who are selling to the Negro mar- 
ket. 

Negro-appeal stations carry their 
merchandising activities right through 
with an advertiser's campaign. Before 
it starts most of them are busy inform- 
ing grocers and druggists and retailers 
that the campaign is coming. When it's 
lolling, they try every means possible 
— from personal appearances to bath- 
ing beauty contests, and from window 
displays to the opening of new outlets 
— to carry through the air advertising 
to point-of-purchasp. 



Q. Is the amount of Negro-appeal 
radio on the increase? 

A. Definitely. In a stud\ conducted 
by SPONSOR among those U. S. stations 
who aim part or all of their program- 
ing at the Negro market, this fact was 
established clearly. Replies came from 
nearl\ 30' '< of all such stations in the 
country. 

No station reported that it was do- 
ing less in the way of Negro-appeal 
programing than it had been doing in 
the past couple of years. All of them 
reported either the same amount, or an 
increased amount. Most marked up- 
swing was among those stations in ma- 
jor metropolitan centers, both in the 
South and in the North, that aim part 
of their programing at Negroes, and 
part at white listeners. 

It's interesting to note that in at least 
70% of the markets from which Ne- 
gro-appeal stations reported, there are 
one or more TV stations. Oddly 
enough, video seems to have little ef- 
fect on the growing amount and grow- 
ing loyalty to programing designed for 
Negro listeners — one good reason why 
there is a general upbeat in this field. 

A few years ago. very little was 
known of the techniques and results of 
programing to Negroes. Today, due to 
everything from word-of-mouth to ar- 
ticles in sponsor, many independent 
stations who are not now airing Negro- 
appeal programing are considering 
adding it to their program fare. There- 
fore you're likely to see a steady growth 
in the number of outlets aiming at the 
Negro until every major Negro mar- 
ket in the U. S. is covered by radio. 



|iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiii:iiii;iiiijiii:i::iiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiy 




promo-gram 

I station of 1 
| Charlotte | 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiH 



WGIV ... is the FIRST and 
ONLY Charlotte Station with 
Negro air personalities. 

WGIV . . . only five years old 
. . . has consistently led with 
new ideas. 

WGIV . . . reaches over 
206,000 Negroes, 46,000 of 
which live in Charlotte's City 
limits. 

WGIV . . . has three top- 
drawer Negro personalities 
GENIAL GENE, CHATTY 
HATTY, and GOLDEN BOY 
GORDON. 

WGIV . . . adds the tremen- 
dous bonus of promo-gram- 
ming with its white personali- 
ties . . . Minuteman Dehlin, 
Fido Myers, Cousin Hank 
Grad, Johnny Surratt, Pa- 
tricia Phoenix, and Moosic- 
man Friar ... to bring vou 
Charlotte's ONLY THREE- 
THIRDS station. 

WGIV ... is PULSE-ating. 
Ask Forjoe to show vou latest 
PULSE! 

For availabilities call 5-4829. 
Charlotte, N. C, or ask your 
Forjoe Man. 

iii!!!iiiiiiiiii!iiii!iiiiiiiii!iiii:!iii:!iii::i!iiiiii:iiiiim 



"Charlotte's \ 
choice is the | 
musical voice ' 



82 



SPONSOR 



Q. Will there ever be a "Negro- 
appeal network?" 

A. It's not beyond possibility. In the 
near future, there may well be special 
regional hookups of Negro-appeal in- 
dependent stations formed to handle 
Negro sports events, entertainment pro- 
grams, news events and the like. This, 
however, is still very much in the crys- 
tal ball stajje. 



Q. What station rep firms make a 
specialty of representing Negro- 
appeal outlets? 

A. The list of station reps who allocate 
all or part of their time in lining up 
advertisers for Negro-appeal radio out- 
lets is growing, since many a "general 
programing" independent station is 
adding Negro programing. 

The following firms are generally 
felt to be outstanding for their work in 
developing Negro-appeal programs, or 
in representing the stations who air 
them. Altogether, the Negro-appeal 
stations represented by this group 
leach potentially about 75 % of the na- 
tion's Negro homes. The order in 
which they are here listed is alphabeti- 
cal. 

1. Dora-Clayton Agency, 405 Mort- 
gage Guarantee Bldg.. Atlanta 3, Ga. 
Telephone is Alpine 1241. Operated by 
Dora C. Cosse and Clayton J. Cosse. 
Primarily represents stations in the 
Southeastern U.S., both white and 
Negro-appeal. Works in conjunction 
with Forjoe & Company, Inc.. as that 
firm's Southeast office. 

2. Forjoe & Company, Inc., 29 
West 57th St., New York City. Tele- 
phone is Plaza 5-8501. President is 
Joseph Bloom. Primarily a general 
rep. Forjoe also handles many Negro- 
appeal and part-Negro-appeal outlets 
throughout the U.S. Has offices in Chi- 
cago. San Francisco, Los Angeles, At- 
lanta. 

3. Interstate United Newspapers, 
545 Fifth Avenue, New York City. Tel- 
ephone is Murray Hill 2-5452. Direc- 
tor of the Radio Division is Joe Woot- 
ton. Firm also represents 152 Negro 
newspapers in about 40 major mar- 
kets. Radio outlets represented total 
about 25. and either are entirely Ne- 
gro-appeal or largely Negro-appeal. 
Maintains offices in Chicago. Detroit. 
Los Angeles. 

4. John E. Pearson Company. 250 
Park Avenue. New York City. Tele- 
phone is Plaza 8-2255. Firm is pri- 
marily a general rep, but handles a few 



1000 WATTS 




PAL 



"Many thanks to SPONSOR for this informative and 
instructive edition on the negro market and radio. 

"We are proud and happy that we are one of the stations 
in the country which very early recognized the tremendous 
importance of our negro citizens, and that we have been 
serving them with listenable programs for over three 
years now. 

"Rob Nichols' "Blues 'n' Boogie", "Jive Parade", and 
"Harlemoods", and Emmet t Lampkin's "In the Garden" 
and "In the Garden Vespers" are living, working proof 
that there is a strong demand — yes, in the south, too 
— for intelligent, entertaining programming to the 
negro audience. 

"The Hooper figures bear this out. Emmett Lamp- 
kin's programs are the highest-rated local personality 
shows in the market. Results bear this out, too! 
Satisfied sponsors who have been on these programs 
for years and years. 

"You can experience the same quick results, and 
happy business association, by reaching the southern 
east coast negro market (some 300,000 in our cov- 
?rage area) by advertising on WPAL." 




Reach—Sell 

300,000 NEGROES 

in Los Angeles and Southern California 
USE JOE ADAMS, the West's first and foremost 

NEGRO D. J. on !/A|lf| 5000 watts 



Represented by 

GEORGE W. CLARK 

CHICAGO — NEW YORK 



I 



CLEAR CHANNEL 

SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA 



DORA CLAYTON 

ATLANTA, GA. 



28 JULY 1952 



83 



EMS 



New York's No. 1 
Station for America's 
No. 1 Negro Market 




Dr. Jire 

One of WWRL's 

sales-producing 

personalities 



WWRL has a larger audi- 
ence in the 1,001,371 New 
York Negro Market than 
any other station — network 
or independent — according 
to Pulse Reports. 

WWRL moves merchandise 
FAST . . . that's why more 
and more national advertis- 
ers are using WWRL's 8 
great Negro audience shows 
to outsell all competition 

They include: 

Camel Cigarettes 
Quaker Corn Meal 
Aunt jemima Flour 
Scott's Emulsion 
Knickerbocker Beer 
BC Headache Powders 
Carolina Rice 
Feenamint 
Lydia Pinkham 
Manischewitz Wine 

Discover today how WWRL's specially 
designed programs plus sales- 
creating station merchandising can 
produce greater sales for you in New 
York's one million Negro market — 
at a cost of 12c per thousand listeners. 

Remember, New York's Negro 
population exceeds the enti-e popula- 
tion^ of Pittsburgh, Boston, St. Louis or 
San Francisco. 

Pulse Reports on request. 

NEwtown 9-3300 

in New York City 
at 5,090 Watts 

BTO1 



Negro-appeal stations, notably WDIA. 
Offices in five cities besides New York, 
including Chicago, Dallas. Minneapo- 
lis. Los Angeles and San Francisco. 

5. Preferred Negro Markets, 29 W. 
57th St., New York City. Telephone 
is Plaza 3-1378. A relative newcomer 
to the field, this firm makes a specialty 
of representing Negro-appeal stations, 
many of which also program for white 
audiences. Expansion, more offices are 
planned. * * * 



m 



NEGRO RESULTS 

(Continued from page 39) 

of a gift certificate for identifying a 
mystery tune. Many of the names re- 
ceived were later converted by a Ray- 
theon TV dealer into sales. 

Supermarket — An unsolicited letter 
from Safeway Stores says: "Since using 
WLIB we have enjoyed such splendid 
sales increases in our locations cater- 
ing to the Negro sections, we wanted to 
express our thanks for service well 
done. On occasion we have requested 
that we wanted stores to be given em- 
phasis by means of address mention. 
In each instance sales in these locations 
have reflected the emphasis bv virtue 
of high volume of sales on the items 
mentioned on your station. Then. too. 
when we have used WLIB to promote 
a new opening we have needed police 
protection to direct the heavy traffic." 



BBomvsi&ad-, Pei. 

Tailor shop — For 22 years J. Ed- 
ward Trower operated a single clean- 
ing shop in Pittsburgh's Hill District. 
Then, in 1948, he picked up the spon- 
sorship of Todays Calendar, a five- 
minute daily roundup of club, social 
and church news narrated by Mary 
Dee. This account of the activities of 
the Negro community soon had hun- 
dreds of listeners sending in announce- 
ments and news items. Negro organ- 
izations were offered their first oppor- 
tunity to use a program designed ex- 
clusively for them. 

The response, in terms of sales, were 
significant. In order to show their ap- 
preciation . whole clubs and church 
groups "took their clothes to Trowers." 
A second store was opened in 1949, a 
third in 1950 and this June WHOD did 
a remote broadcast from the fourth 
Trower Tailoring store to celebrate its 
opening. Trower's sole sustained ad- 
vertising during this period was this 
one radio program. 



Station Managers! 

Can You Pick A Winner? 
(And Do You ^eed A Salesman?) 

Most of us are in the dark 
when it comes to picking a 
winning horse, including the 
touters who make the track 
their business. To a certain 
extent you depend on per- 
formance from past races or 
by jockey statistics, but the 
odds are still in favor of the 
pari-mutuel windows. Picking 
a winner in salesmanship isn't 
as ambiguous. While you still 
rely on past performance, the 
statistics are greater. You can 
judge ambition, integrity, 
character, and the know how 
of delivery plus the creative 
ability of your lifeline to the 
buyer. With all these extra 
advantages though, how many 
times do you lose? If you 
could put all these facts on a 
horse's nose, and it would help 
put him across the finish 
line, the racing commission 
wouldn't exist until another 
sunrise. 

Here is an offer to radio 
and television managers who 
would like to have a winner 
on their sales staff. He is 
capable of winning all handi- 
caps, but he needs a bettor. 
He is chock full of confidence 
that selling is his forte. If 
your message needs the most 
effective selling you can find 
as a vehicle, won't you please 
arrange for an appointment. 



BOX 7A, SPONSOR 

510 MADISON AVENUE 
NEW YORK 22, N. Y. 



84 



SPONSOR 



WBOK, Netv Orleans 

Automobiles — "Ten new Studebak- 
ers sold in five days from a spot cam- 
paign." (Westbank Auto Sales) 

Photo studio ■ — "2,000 replies by 
phone and mail in one week, with a 
complete sell-out of our facilities." 
(Lincoln Photo Studio) 

Sewing machines— "$100,000 worth 
of sewing machine sales during my first 
year for an expenditure of $3,500 on 
WBOK." (Dixie Sewing Dealers I 

WEAS, Decatur, Ga. 

Mail pull — Station reports an aver- 
age of 350 mail requests per day for 
records on their morning Negro block, 
almost 225 a day for their afternoon 
session. This is purely request mail, 
and not a hoked-up gimmick deal to 
increase mail-pull figures. 

WLOU, Louisville 

Beer — Oertels beer started a cam- 
paign the day this station went on the 
air. They report that their sales have 
steadily increased until they now have 
65% of the Negro market in the area 
despite competition from two other 
prominent local beers. 

Mens clothing — Moskins Clothiers 
gives complete credit to the station for 
a 40% sales increase. 

WSOK, Nashville 

Refrigerators — An appliance dealer 
reports selling 42 used electric refrig- 
erators in one day as a result of nine 
half-minute announcements. 

Electrical repair shop — This store 
showed a 66% increase in volume as a 
result of a month's campaign of one 
announcement daily. 

Cosmetics — This manufacturer in- 
creased his volume of sales 600% in 
April of this year over April of last 
year as a result of a heavy spot and 
program campaign over WSOK. 

WEDR, Birmingham 

Laundry starch — A local company 
claims to have gone from 1% of the 
total starch sales in this area to 11 % 
within a year's time on this station. 

Electrical appliances — A Birming- 
ham dealer phoned the station to say 
that he traced over $5,000 in appliance 
sales during one weekend to WEDR 
spot campaign. 

Piano course — In spite of a four- 
week steel strike which had a telling 
effect on the community's buying 
power, a disk jockey on this station 
took orders for piano courses from 
250 customers. 



Where Can You Buy 
Average Ratings of 




Right now you're looking at the home of College Radio — "campus- 
limited" stations managed and operated by students for students. Sixty- 
one college radio stations make up the Intercollegiate Broadcasting 
System. These stations offer not only a great educational opportunity 
for the undergraduates, but also an unexcelled medium for the adver- 
tiser to reach the college student. 

Wfteit you sell a college student, tjou're got a lifetime 
customer! There are 6,000,000 college graduates living today, and 
the college halls embrace 2,000,000 undergraduates. The college market 
is the best "heeled" and certainly the most influential group in the 
country today. 

The time to influence this group is when they are in college. If it is a 
product you are selling, remember brand preferences formed in these 
years may very well be lasting! If you have an institutional message, 
present it while they are in college! 

College years are the years for assimilating knowledge and ideas. It 
is a time of preparation for life. It is a formative period. Form their 
buying habits — for your product — while they're in college! 

You buy average ratings of 24.0! The most effective way 

of reaching and selling the college student is through his or her own 

college radio station. Like pep rallies and proms, campus broadcasting 

is an integral part of college life. 

Proof of this rests in the fact that recent audience surveys show that the 

average time period on a college station enjoys a rating of 24.0. Add to 

this consistently high rating the intense loyalty of the listeners, and 

you know you have an advertising medium magna cum laude! 

You can buy any of the 61 IBS affiliates individually or as a group. 

For complete market data and information regarding IBS facilities, 

programs, coverage and rates, contact the IBS representative. 



Intercollegiate Broadcasting System 

The Thomas F. Clark Co., Inc. 

205 East 42nd Street, New York 17, New York 
35 E. Wacker Drive Chicago, Illinois 

3049 E. Grand Blvd. Detroit, Michigan 




28 JULY 1952 



85 



THE YRE ALL ON 

WMRY ■ ■ ■ ^ 




NEW ORLEANS TOP 
INDEPENDENT STATION* 

* SEE PULSE OF NEW ORLEANS 
Programmed for Negroes, 
by Negroes 




Morf Silverman — Gen. Mgr. 

John E. Pearson Co. — Nat'l. Rep. 



NOW HEARD BY MORE PEOPLE 

IN THE COMMUNITY THAN 

ANY OTHER STATION- 

WLIB 

1 190 KC • 1000 Watts 

THE ONLY STATION WITH 
STUDIOS IN HARLEM 

Most complete coverage in New York 

57 HOURS OF 

SPECIAL PROGRAMS 

featuring an outstanding 
roster of Negro talent 

JOE BOSTIC PHIL GORDON 

LARRY FULIER NIPSEY RUSSELL 

RUTH ELLINGTON JAMES 

NEW: Walter White Show starring 
Exec. Secy of NAACP now 
syndicated in major cities. 



"Pulse. May 1952 



WLIB 



207 East 30 Street, N. Y. 16, N. Y. 



W'JIV, Savannah, fia. 

Mail orders — This station has a con- 
tinuing test of its strength via mail 
order items, averages 15,000 pieces of 
mail per month. During a 60-day pe- 
riod it pulled orders for 2,476 relig- 
ious motif plastic tablecloths at $2.95 
each; 515 Charm Cards at $1.50 each; 
833 Bible Answer Books; 450 replicas 
of Rudolph The Red Nosed Reindeer. 

WIWRY, JVen« Orleans 

Real Estate— "The Sepia Station" 
got the nod for selling 40 homes via 
46 announcements. 

Drug store — Prescription business 
up 300% in month as result of an an- 
nouncement campaign. 

WWCA, Gary 

Home equipment — Local concern re- 
ports 500 direct leads per week as after- 
math of two quarter-hour sessions 
daily on this station. 

Chicken farm — Realtor sold a $7,- 
000 farm on the basis of three 100- 
word announcements. 

WPAL, Charleston 

Varied advertisers — Highly signifi- 
cant is this station's record: 97% of 
the accounts which started out with 
this station four years ago are still with 
it. and all Negro programs are sold 
out. 

KOMI.. Santa Monica 

Beer — Maier Brew moved from 
seventh place in beer sales in the Los 
Angeles area to first position with Ne- 
groes within a period of 18 months 
during which they used the Joe Adams 
show on KOWL. 

Talent contest — Station received re- 
assurance of high listenership during 
a recent talent contest. Over 7,000 
telephone calls voting for talent con- 
testants were registered in one after- 
noon. 

These are only a sampling of the 
success stories which Negro-program- 
ing stations throughout the count r\ 
have to tell. 

National advertisers listed on page 
39 are, for the most part, stepping up 
their efforts to tap this $15,000,000,- 
000 market via the potent sales pull of 
the community-minded radio stations 
which aim their entertainment, services 
and sales pitches at the American 
Ne»ro. * * * 



SELLING TO NEGROES 

{Continued from page 37) 

nouncer or personality has to read a 
piece of copy that makes him sound 
like something from Uncle Tom's Cab- 
in the average Negro listener will react 
adversely, if the appeal doesn't ring 
true. 

Admen and media men who are fa- 
miliar with Negro-appeal radio were 
quick to point out to SPONSOR that the 
most successful air advertisers in Ne- 
gro programing avoid the use of any 
kind of "canned" advertising, whether 
it be live copy or transcriptions. In- 
stead, they use simple copy or copy 
outlines, and let the individual per- 
former present it in his own style. 

One station manager told SPONSOR: 
"What an advertiser may lack in 'uni- 
formity' by this method, he'll more 
than make up for by cashing in on the 
intense loyalty to favorite local person- 
alities in Negro radio. His commercial, 
in effect, receives a personal endorse- 
ment." 

Of course, this applies primarily to 
advertisers who are using program seg- 
ments, or participations in local Ne- 
gro-appeal shows. The same thing does 
not apply quite as much to brief station 
breaks, time signals and the like, where 
there is little room for "style." 

However, it's wise for advertisers to 
remember that even in a series of 20- 
. second announcements that are being 
transcribed for a widespread use in Ne- 
gro markets, nationally-known Negro 
performers can often be used in place 
of the usual white talent. 

3. Negroes have some specialized 
quirks concerning radio commercials 
and radio offers. 

While Negroes respond to the same 
arguments as any cross-section of lis- 
teners, not all the techniques in the 
broadcast adman's bag of tricks apply. 
Here are a few of the more important 
taboos, as gathered by SPONSOR in its 
national survey of Negro radio: 

A. Negroes do not go for sight-un- 
seen premiums of jewelry, and other 
"gimmick" inducements to product 
buying often used as part of radio cam- 
paigns. Commented WDIA, Memphis: 
"We have always supposed this is a re- 
action from the days when people as- 
sociated cheap jewelry with the Negro 
people." 

B. Negroes in general do not like to 
send in cash in advance for mail-order 
items, nor do they usually like to write 



86 



SPONSOR 



ill for samples or trial offers. As John 
H. Johnson, publisher of Ebony, Jet 
and Tan, stated recently: "If Negroes 
are sold on the product through adver- 
tising, they will buy the brand imme- 
diately." 

C. Negroes often respond more 
readily, on the other hand, to mer- 
chandising gimmicks. Retailers in Ne- 
gro areas, and Negro-owned stores 
have long been passed by in most net- 
work and big-station merchandising 
tie-ups, and give eager support to good 
merchandising plans. Station perform- 
ers are very cooperative about making 
personal appearances at stores, and in 
making product demonstrations. This 
can be a real "plus" to an advertiser 
who makes full use of the merchandis- 
ing facilities offered him by Negro- 
appeal stations, since the average Ne- 
gro performer has been built into a lo- 
cal celebrity by his participation in 
community activities, and by the sta- 
tion's active promotional backing. 

D. Negroes resent any kind of ad- 
vertising stunt that makes a differentia- 
tion between white and colored listen- 
ers, either directly or by implication. 
Contests, for instance, which offer 




Philadelphia's Leading 
Station for Negro Programs 

• • 

SERVING OVER 450,000 
PEOPLE 

• • 

46 HOURS OF PROGRAMS 
WEEKLY 

• • 

FIRST WITH TOP TALENT & 

VOLUME OF COMMUNITY 

PROGRAMS 

• * 

TO REACH AND SELL NEGRO 

PHILADELPHIA WHAT IS 

A MUST . . . 

250 Watts — Unlimited Time 

— I8V2 HRS. DAILY — 

AM — 7340 k.c.—FM— 705.3 meg. 

Represented by 
Interstate United Newspapers 



prizes such as a vacation at a resort 
that does not welcome Negroes will get 
the brush-off from colored listeners. 

E. Negroes are very cautious about 
"bargains." An air advertising cam- 
paign that stresses low price may be a 
big success with price-conscious white 
housewives, for example, but will 
arouse Negro suspicions that perhaps 
something inferior is being passed off 
on them just because they are Negroes. 
This does not mean that a good, low- 
priced item cannot be sold to Negroes 
on the air. It does mean that it must 
be done with tact, and without using 
the price as too much of a come-on. 
Quality is often more important to a 
Negro consumer than a low price tag. 

4. Negroes make a startling amount 
of luxury purchases, with relation to 
median income, but it's best to aim 
air advertising at their basic needs. 

Luxury spending of a "conspicious 
consumption" variety is widely done 
by Negroes, largely due to psychologi- 
cal pressures. As Ebony's John H. 
Johnson wrote recently in the trade 
press : 

"To a Negro, indulgence in luxury 
is a vindication of his belief in his 
ability to match the best of white men. 
He expresses this desire in his pur- 
chase of Cadillac automobiles, $200 
suits, imported Scotch at $9 a bottle 
or a pair of $20 Florsheim shoes. 

"Advertisers of luxury lines have a 
responsive audience in the Negro mar- 
ket for other reasons. One is that 
many Negroes have become acquainted 
with expensive merchandise through 
working with wealthy white people — 
as butlers, valets, maids housekeepers. 
Thus, just as soon as they have the 
money, they immediately purchase the 
items they know through their em- 
ployment." 

However, it's wise for an advertiser 
not to overestimate this luxury mar- 
ket. The Negro is not simply a market 
for all sorts of luxury items, of every 
variety. He will buy first rate foods, 
but he'll steer clear of luxury he doesn't 
understand, like smoked pheasant, plo- 
ver's eggs, elk steaks and the like. He 
will spend as much as possible on his 
home and his family, but he avoids 
buying real estate in areas where he 
feels he will meet discrimination. He 
stays away from luxury stores that 
give a frosty welcome to colored cus- 
tomers. * * * 



THE 

BEST WAY 

TO SELL 

10 MILLION 
NEGROES! 

-•-CONTACT 
I 



PI 



NEGRO MARKET 

RADIO 

SPECIALISTS 



PREFERRED NEGRO MARKETS inc 
29 WEST 57th ST., NEW YORK 19 
PLAZA 3-1378 




Nat D. 
Williams 

One of 
WDIA's 

many famous 
personalities 



Kroger Stores 

Do A Big Selling Job 

With WDIA, Memphis 

Since Fall of '51 Kroger has used a substantial spol 
schedule on WDIA for its large chain of Memphis 
food stores to sell the great Negro segment of the 
Memphis market — further proof of WDIA's complete 
dominance In selling to the 439.266 Negroes in WDIA 
BMB counties for all types of accounts . . . local, 
regional and a great list of national accounts includ- 
ing Wilson &. Co., Maxwell House Coffee, Tide, Blue 
Plate Foods and many others. WDIA can do a big 
job for you, too! Get the full story today. 



HOOPER RADIO AUDIENCE INDEX 

C ity: Memphis, Tenn. Months: April-May '5 2 

D E F G 



Sets WDIA B 



MF HAM-6PM 13.1 23.0 25.5 16.2 10.3 7.4 7.2 7.1 



MEMPHIS WDIA TENN. 

John E. Pearson Co., Representative 



28 JULY 1952 



87 



SPEAKS 






Negro radio mushrooming 
As a footnote to the Negro Radio 
section (which begins on page 29 1 il 
might he mete to recall that it was 
SPONSOR which three \ears previously 
first put the spotlight on this rich field 
through a similar stud). It was while 
that original study was in preparation 
dial the phrase. "The forgotten 15,000,- 
000," got its origin at a sponsor edi- 
torial meeting. 

Much has happened in the develop- 
ment of the Negro market for radio 
since then and the results of experi- 
ments among some 200-plus stations 
are given broad and graphic documen- 
tation in the current issue. The think- 
ing and experimenting that continues 
certainly reflects a singularly creative 
change in social vision. American ad- 
vertisers have been alerted to it and 
thev have gained much from partici- 
pating in this specialized market. 

SPONSOR thinks that there is still 
much in the way of research, program- 
ing ideas, merchandising, promotion 
and whatnot that could be of help to 



many of these 200 stations if there were 
some setup or association through 
which this constantly growing wealth 
of material could be channelized. For 
instance clinics could be held periodi- 
cally which would also serve to raise 
standards and expand types of pro- 
graming and public services within this 
particular community. Perhaps the 
time is ripe for the innovation of some- 
thing along the lines of the BAB, which 
would chart the scope of the market 
and process the exchange of research 
and ideas. 

Case for TV film 

The live vs. film debate you hear 
around the ad agencies these days is 
beginning to sound like so much wind- 
milling after the fact. It's quite ap- 
parent that an influential segment of 
national advertisers has already read 
the handwriting on the wall and ardent- 
ly embraced film-making. P&G, as an 
example, is in to the tune of several 
millions of dollars. (See: Is the rush 
to film shows economically sound?, 
page 19.) 

It will be recalled that it was virtual- 
l\ the same sponsor contingent thai 
spurred the trek toward Hollywood in 
the latter '30's. The prime intent then 
was to borrow for radio some of the 
film industry's name glamor, all of 
which resulted in appreciably expanded 
program budgets. Economy is pri- 
marily the motive for the heavy trend 
to Hollywood and its studio facilities 
todav. The bellwethers of air adver- 
tising are patentlv convinced that the 
one way to keep their TV costs under 
control is to put their programs on 
film. 

The rerun factor mav have some 
weak sides to it but the basic economics 



of the thing is pretty much weighted 
in its favor. Quality programing 
whether live or on film, will always 
have a ready market and as TV ex- 
pands there will be, obviously, myriad 
periods of time to be filled and sold. 
Film product, if priced on an equitable 
level, offers, like good radio transcrip- 
tions, the soundest article, both from 
the viewpoint of saleability and audi- 
ence attraction. 

As for viewer attitude toward repeat 
films, there is a question that lends 
itself to some rewarding research. At 
the moment it looks doubtful whether 
this quirk will tend to put a crimp in 
the filmward march. 

Freeze is really lifted 
The pace with which the FCC has 
begun to issue construction permits for 
TV stations is meeting with much grati- 
fication among advertisers and agen- 
cies, especially where it has concerned 
major and important secondary mar- 
kets. By presstime the commission had 
passed out 18 CPs. Several of these 
stations should be on the air this fall, 
and some agencies report that they 
have already spotted the more impor- 
tant markets in an "if and when" col- 
ume in their budget recommendations 
to clients. 

Most advertisers and agencies were 
surprised — and delighted — with the 
speed with which KFEL-TV, Denver, 
got on the air ( see Sponsor Report, 
page 2 ) . 

Pleased as they are with the unan- 
ticipated quickness of the unfreezing, 
agency executives are inclined to air 
this thought: They would be still more 
pleased if permits were distributed with 
equal alacrity in some one and two- 
station markets. 



Applause 



Greater truth in advertising 

The Fort Wayne Advertising Club, 
following through on an idea suggest- 
ed by the Dallas Advertising Club, 
has rendered a valuable service to all 
advertisers with its recently adopted 
resolution for "truth in advertising." 
Here are some quotes from the resolu- 
tion which should appeal to all air ad- 
vertisers: 

I. "Advertising is universally rec- 
ognized today as a primary sales dis- 
tribution and communications force of 
American business and industry, and 



its effectiveness as a basic element of 
the American economy rests upon the 
faith, confidence and acceptance of the 
American people." 

2. "The current wave of criticism 
(of advertising) reveals that adver- 
tising's critics no longer confine their 
ranks only to its perennial enemies but 
more and more include its long-time 
friends, whose loyalty and support ad- 
vertising now seems in danger of 
losing. 

3. "The Fort Wayne Advertising 
Club looks with disfavor upon adver- 



tising which, directh or indirectly, im- 
putes dishonesty to all advertisers or 
. . . disparages the integrity of . . . 
advertising. . . ." 

4. "The Fort Wayne Advertising 
Club call upon all segments of Ameri- 
can advertising .... to join in an ap- 
peal to all advertisers and those en- 
gaged in the preparation and dissemi- 
nation of advertising copy to eliminate 
or avoid practices, statements or copy 
stratagems which tends to impair the 
faith and confidence of the American 
people in the spoken word of business 
and industry. . . ." 



88 



SPONSOR 



I * k A 



Team and It's 



<TO 



,W. 



•tat 



^fllHi 



ic 



IMMecvificC cuteC ll^M/ 



"Pnaatawt - Ti/tAe . 



* 



Does the farmer stop milking his cows during the summer? Ridiculous! 
No more than the KMBC-KFRM Service Farms stop farming during the 
summer — or no more than Phil Evans, Bob Riley or Jim Leathers stop pass- 
ing out that vital farm information to the Heart of America farmer who 
turns on the radio in his barn to catch KMBC-KFRM farm programs while 
he gets his milking done. Or no more than the Team's News Department 
stops disseminating the latest news in eleven daily newscasts. Yes indeed, 
KMBC-KFRM is ''program-wise." Summer time — wintertime, the Team is 
on-the-air with the kind of programming that it knows from thirty years of 
broadcasting experience the largest share of the audience will return to, and 
listen for, day after day. 

It is this program wisdom which has long since placed The KMBC-KFRM 
Team in top spot in The Heart of America — and continues to keep The Team 
in that spot by a comfortable margin. 

^L* This is the first of a series on The KMBC-KFRM know-how which spells dominance 
in the Heart of America. 



Call KMBC-KFRM or your nearest Free & Peters Colonel for the KMBC- 
^Trfe- KFRM program story. BE WISE- REALIZE . . . to sell the Whole Heart of 



11111 



America Wholeheartedly it's 



CBS RADIO FOR THE HEART OF AMERICA 



OWNED AND OPERATED BY MIDLAND BROADCASTING COMPANY 




RADIO STATION REPRESENTATIVES 




t^mm/^trnmrnm 
















Hi 



use magazine foi land TV advertisers 



^ 






11 AUGUST 1952 



50c per copy • $8 per year 




INCORPORATED 

STATION REPRESENTATIVES 



$1,000,000 TV sponsor 
without a sales problem 

page 27 

TV IS CHANGING 
MEDIA BUYING 

page 30 

The Advertising Council: 
1 1 years of fund raising 
and good will building 

page 32 

What does it cost 
to build and run 
a TV station? 

page 34 

CANADIAN RADIO 

Second annual 
Canadian section 

starts on page 




i 

tion 

f' 

Tip on selling in 

the nanariian marlrpt 




- 



Canadian radir 

page 80 







//&%^ 



does a complete job . . . 



SO DO HAVENS AND MARTIN, Inc. STATIONS . . - 



WMBG 
WCOD 
WTVR 







FIRST STATIONS OF VIRGINIA 



American industry is big with advertising- 
studded successes, yet none is bigger than 
Kellogg. Advertising, and especially air 
advertising, has taken Corn Flakes and other 
fine products of this Battle Creek firm into every 
nook and cranny of our country — and many 
other countries. Kellogg does a complete job, 
from farmer to miller to delectable product 
to dealer to consumer. And in the rich Virginia 
markets, Havens and Martin Stations help the 
assembly line move faster. 

Havens and Martin Stations, WMBG, WCOD, 
and WTVR, are available to alert advertisers as 
the modern way to sell in the Old Dominion 
State. There are reasons aplentyl Havens and 
Martin Stations are the only complete broad- 
casting institution in Richmond; for more than a 
quarter century they've featured the kind 
of public service that builds loyalty and 
affection; they bring NBC to viewers and 
listeners; they're a quality operation doing a 
job for quality products. 



WMBG *« WCOD ™ WTVR" 



Havens & Martin Inc. Stations are the only 
complete broadcasting institution in Richmond. 
Pioneer NBC outlets for Virginia's first market. 
WTVR represented nationally by Blair TV, Inc. 
WMBG represented nationally by The Boiling Co. 






CBS might act 

unilaterally 

on night-time 

rate slash 



CBS, affiliate 

would each 

take 15% 

reduction 



Republicans 
pick Kudner 



RTMA asks 

immediate 

price 

decontrol 



BAB's Ryan 

charts radio's 

pull over 

newspapers 



Cockfield, 

Brown leads 

in Canadian 

production 



WNEW collects 

on future 

earnings of d.j. 

released to WCBS 



Impression prevailing in New York ad agency circles last week was if 
CBS and radio affiliates can't com e to agreement on terms of rate ad- 
ju s tment at affiliates meeting in Chicago this week network will 
announce rate card change anyway, effective Sept. 1. CBS at this 
point committed to advertisers on rate revision to amount of over 
$5,000,000 for 1952-53 season and it's become question with CBS 
whether to cancel rate changes made to such clients as Procter & Gam- 
ble, Lever Bros, and Colgate or exercise clause in some 170 affiliate 
contracts allowing CBS readjust rates without affiliate consultation. 

-SR- 
Rate revision as submitted by CBS was on 50-50 basis with network and 
affiliates each giving up 15% existing rate. Cut would apply only to 
night-time. One counter proposal made by members of affiliates com- 
mittee, which did preliminary negotiating with CBS, was that any ad- 
justment be shown through network discount structure. This may be 
network compromise, though it prefers straight rate revision. 

-SR- 
Kudner Agency drew the Presidentia l cam p aig n assignment from the 
Republican National Committee, with contact going to Shafto Dene, 
Kudner vice-president and copy chief. Joseph Katz had been previously 
picked by the Democratic National Committee. Lloyd Whitebrook will be 
Katz's executive on the account. 

-SR- 
Immediate l ifting OPS ceiling on TV and radio sets and parts has been 
asked by Radio-Television Manufacturers Association. In petition to 
OPA the RTMA argued that set prices being 5 to 15% below ceiling jus- 
tified decontrol. RTMA also doubted whether TV station thaw will have 
much effect on over-all TV set market. 

-SR- 
William B. Ryan, BAB president, in separate talks before Syracuse re- 
tailers and agencies last week told how po int-of-sale check by ARBI at 
four S y racuse retail outlets (including a Sears store) showed radijD 
out pullin g ne wsp apers advertising in store traffic by wide margin. 
Four stores reported that their customers had been influenced by fol- 
lowing media: radio, 38.6%; newspapers, 31.8%; both, 17.4%; other 
12.2%. On medium credit for volume sales produced the average count 
came to: radio 45.7%; newspapers, 18.3%; both 28.5%; other, 7.8%. 

-SR- 
Cockfield, Brown & Co., Montreal, sets new record for weekly program 
production among Canadian agencies. Now producing 230 15-minute pro- 
grams a week, along with 2 one-hour network shows, 6 half-hour shows, 
5 5-minute programs and 11 announcement campaigns. (See Canadian sec- 
tion, which starts on page 61. ) 

-SR- 
WNEW, New York, now has stake in sponsorship success of a WCBS, New 
York, program. When one of its d.j.'s (Bob Haymes) left station re- 
cently to move to CBS flagship, it was with stipulation that WNEW 
would get percentag e of future ear n ings . riaymes' contract with WNEW 
had two years to run when he was released to WCBS. Returns to WNEW 
are said to be he avy . 



SPONSOR, Volume 6, No. 16, II August 1952. Published biweekls by SPONSOR publications, Inc., at 3110 Elm Ave.. Baltimore, Md. Executive. Editorial. Advertising, Circu- 
lation Offices 5in Madison Ave.. New York 22, $8 a year in U. S. $9 elsewhere. Entered as second class matter 29 January 1949 at Baltimore, Md. postofflce under Act 3 March 1879. 



REPORT TO SPONSORS for 11 August 1952 



TV film directors 

to share in rerun 

proceeds 



Rybutal going 
Canadian radio 



NIC reports 

local market 

media trend 



Hotpoint, 

Lambert 

co-sponsor 

Ozzie & Harriet 



Hormel Cirls 

on spot TV 

via film 

this fall 



UPT's status 

as TV film 

producer 

puzzles nets 



N. 



Y. viewers 

favored 

Republican 

convention 



Directors of TV films will participate in proceeds from sale of reruns 
under 3-year agreement with Alliance of Television Film Producers. 
Directors get $275 on fourth showing of film which will also cover all 
runs thereafter. Members Screen Actors Guild (as disclosed SPONSOR 
28 July 1952, Is the rush to film shows economically s ound) likewise 
have participating arrangements with ATFP. 

-SR- 

Rybutal (Vitamin Corp. of America) launching extensive radio and news- 
paper campaign in Canada. Spot announcements and schedule of 15 5- 
minute programs weekl y already set, with deal also being made to air 
Gabriel Heatter. Rybutal is latest heavy U.S. air spender to join 
long list American advertisers using Canadian radio. Campaign will be 
handled by Ronalds Agency, Toronto. (See Canadian Section , page 61.) 

-SR- 

National Industrial Conference Board reports survey among 157 com- 
panies shows advertising appropriations and media planning undergoing 
changes in keeping with 1952 sales needs. Budgets, adds report, are 
"tending upwards and advertising is being aimed more specifically at 
individual markets." Statement about advertising pattern tends to 
bear out premise of article, How TV is changing med i a buying pat t erns, 
in current issue SPONSOR (see page 30), which was prepared prior to 
release of report. 

-SR- 

Hotpoint and Lambert Companies have underwritten radio and TV spon- 
sorship on alternate week basis of The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet 
on ABC Friday nights starting 1 October. Each version will be aired 
at different times but there will be combined rate. 

-SR- 

Hormel & Co. is another radio advertiser that has assumed financing of 
its own programs. Series of 13 half-hour TV shows was built around 
radio program featuring Hormel Girls ; it is in process of being com- 
pleted in Kling Studios, Chicago. Much of the film was shot in Hol- 
lywood under personal supervision of sponsor Jay C. Hormel. Films 
scheduled for fall airing on spot basis ; BBDO is Hormel agency. 

-SR- 

Common topic speculation in network executive circles is whether 
Uni ted Paramount Theatres in event FCC approves ABC deal will be per- 
mitted to engage in production of TV films. Under divorcement from 
Paramount Pictures Corp., as part settlement of Government's anti- 
trust suit, latter was confined to making motion pictures and UPT to 
operation of theatres. 

-SR~ 

Pulse found in special check of 12,500 homes in New York area Repub- 
lican convention had 30% edge over TV tune-in of Democratic conven- 
tion. Republicans averaged 16.5 for daytime sessions and 43.0 at 
night. Democrats' averages were 12.2 daytime and 32.0 nights. 



(Please turn to page 54^ 



SPONSOR 



The* J 4i an 1 1 *f Four 



KWEM 



WEST MEMPHIS, ARK. 

MEMPHIS, TENN. 

1000 WATTS 



WGOV 



VALDOSTA, CA. 
5000 WATTS 




WJIV 



SAVANNAH, CA. 
1000 WATTS 



WEAS 



DECATUR-ATLANTA, CA. 
10,000 WATTS 



Present: An interview with Senator Quad. 



Question: What is your 7952 platform, 
Senator Quad? 



Answer: In behalf of the more than 5 
million loyal southern consumers who have 
nominated the family four as their choice tor 
all 'round good listening, I stand firmly on a 
platform of greater sales impact. And I 
furthermore declare my unyielding faith in the 
three R's as championed by these outstanding 
stations. Added together these three R's pro- 
duce the most important R of all, 



Ml 




urn m. = Results 



EllCION 



I umilu III I • Fnttiifi/ 1444 



11 AUCUST 1952 



For Complete Information Call Your Nearest Forjoe Office 
I Family 4444 • I Family 4444 • I a mil y 4444 • Family 
or Stars Inc., Candler Building, Atlanta, Ga. 

3 



ITET1 




1 1 August 19^2 • Voiume 6 Number 16 




ARTICLES 



DEPARTMENTS 



81,000,000 TV sponsor without a sales problem 

Revere is No. I among copper-clad pots and pans and it can't get enough metal 
to expand production. Nonetheless it regards "Meet the Press" as vital effort 
to insure future sales, uphold company's prestige on the industrial level 

M oil' TV Is rftonoino media blti/iiig 

Agency media strategists are now evaluating the role of major media in the 
post-freeze TV era. Some of their conclusions: market-by-market rather than 
national coverage will be dominant; co-op advertising will gain 

Good Samaritan of the adrerlising intlustrg 

For I I years the Advertising Council has coordinated public service activities 
within the industry, produced tangible results in fund raising and good will 

14 hat tloes it eost to build a TV station? 

It costs a minimum of $105,000 to build even the smallest TV station, charts 
prepared for SPONSOR reveal. These cost breakdowns are designed to show 
admen why time costs — even for new stations — are set high 



£7 



30 



32 



34 



MEN, MONEY & MOTIVES 6 

510 MADISON 10 

MR. SPONSOR: Jack M. Fox 14 

NEW AND RENEW 19 

P. S. 24 

TV RESULTS 36 

COMMERCIAL REVIEWS 40 

MR. SPONSOR ASKS 44 

ROUNDUP 46 
AGENCY PROFILE: Emil Remhardt 50 

WHAT'S NEW IN RESEARCH 52 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 136 



SECOND ANNUAL CANADIAN RADIO SECTION 

The C« nadian market: row materials spur boom 

Discovery of rich mineral deposits has drawn vast sums of development capital 
into Canada, boosted income, productivity, sales to new highs 

< (modioli radio: Dominion's lowest-cost medittm 

High listenership, less competition per station, deep penetration, lack of TV, and 
low rates are some of the reasons why radio is good buy in Canada 

Tips on selling to Canadians 

Treating our northern neighbors as "branch-office Americans" won't sell goods. 
French and English-speaking audiences differ widely, need special handling 

Don- leading sponsors use Conodion radio 

Most successful U. S. advertisers have been those who studied market, planned 
programs with wide audience acceptance, and didn't spread advertising too thin 

Conodion TV: tiro stations. 103,454 sets 

Outlook for commercial utilization of Canada's TV is dim. Limited programing, 
heavy restrictions ond feather-bedded costs are current obstacles 



COMING 



02 



00 



70 



00 



00 



PS! 



■ 



Editor & President: Norman R. Glenn 
Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glenn 
Executive Editor: Ben Bodec 
Managing Editor: Miles David 
Senior Editors: Charles Sinclair, Alfred J. Jaffa 
Department Editor: Fred Birnbaum 
Assistant Editors: Lila Lederman, 
Richard A. Jackson, Evelyn Konrad 
Special Projects Editor: Ray Lapica 
Contributing Editors: Bob Landry, Bob Foreman 
Art Director: Donald H. Duffy 
Photographer: Jean Raeburn 
Vice President - Advertising: Norman Knight 
Advertising Department: Edwin D. Cooper 
(Western Manager), George Weiss (Travel- 
ing Representative, Chicago Office), Maxine 
Cooper (New York Office), John A. Kovchok 
(Production Manager), Cynthia Soley, John 
McCormack 

Vice President - Business Mgr.: Bernard Piatt 
Circulation Department: Evelyn Satz (Sub 
scriotion Manaqer), Emily Cutillo, Josephine 
Doloroso, Patricia Collins (Readers' Service) 
Secretary to Publisher: Augusta Shearman 
Office Manager: Olive Sherban 



Hon- Si'hick licked a sales slump 



25 Xnifnsi 



Piled-up inventories melted and electric shaver sales boomed when Schick used 
network TV. New show being added to make product year-round item 

Wftof agencies plan for farm radio next season 

SPONSOR poll among advertising agencies shows increased activity in the field 
of rural radio used to sell general consumer products 



Publllhcd biweekly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC 

i iblned with TV. Executive. Editorial. Circulation, end 

Advertising Offices: 510 Madison Ave.. New York 22 
N. y. Telephone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office 
161 E. Oraml Ave.. Suite 110. Telephone: Superior 7-9863 
West Coast Office: B087 Sunset Boulevard. Los Angeles 
Telephone: Hillside 8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm 
Ave.. Baltimore 11, m.i Subscriptions: United States 
$8 a year. Canada and foreign $9. Single copies 50c. 
Printed In U. S. A. Address all correspondence to 510 
Madison Avenue. New York 22. N.Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. 
Copyright 1952. SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 




his is 
where 





dominates 




Listener loyalty is traceable to 30 years of intense local pro- 
gramming, extensive news reporting, NBC shows and out- 
standing service to the community. 

Advertisers' loyalty is proved by renewal orders from Amer- 
ica's leading food, drug, automotive, appliance, beverage, 
farm and other accounts. 

Phone or write your Henry I. Christal representative. He is 
armed with facts and figures to show you how and why 
WTMJ dominates in Milwaukee and Wisconsin. 



THE MILWAUKEE JOURNAL RADIO STATION 

5.000 WATTS • 620 KC • NBC 



■MHHBH 



Represented by 

THE HENRY I. CHRISTAL CO. 



New York 



Chicago 



■J*9°° a 




...any way (^} 
you figure it /M/ 

KROW 

reaches more 
Listeners-per- J 
than any other 
San Francisco or 
Oakland Station* 

'PULSE for Oakland and for San Francisco, 
June, 1952 




BEST BUY IN 2 MARKETS! 

There's a billion-and-a-half dollar 
market on each side of San Fran- 
cisco Bay! Over 150 result-con- 
scious advertisers . . . local, re- 
gional, national . . . now use KROW 
of Oakland to reach both of these 
markets at the lowest cost-per- 
thousand of any station in San 
Francisco or Oakland. Incidently, 
there are comparatively few TV 
sets in these markets. 

For details, see 
PAUL H. RAYMER COMPANY, INC. 



KROW 

Radio Center Bldg. 
19th & Broadway • Oakland, Calif. 
Serving the Entire Oakland-San Francisco Bay Area 




by 

Robert J. Landry 



Russian "radiofieation" 

Way back in the 1920s Soviet Russia pioneered in shortwave radio 
propaganda beamed in all directions world around. \lan\ a Yankee 
ham stayed up all night to bring in Siberia. Communist strategist 
Lenin himself had recognized the dynamic nature of radio, spoke of 
it as "newspapers without paper." Today, in obedience to the Lenin 
dictate, uncounted Russian transmitters are busy night and daw 

Details are skimpy but the nerve-center is clearly Moscow. Rus>ia 
uses 34 languages exterior to the Soviet and 70 languages interior to 
its own borders. In short, the United States with 29 spoken tongues. 
including Mesquakie Indian, is only one-half as polyglot as Russia. 

* * * 

Currently Russia has joined with its satellites in an elaborate ex- 
change of programs, news, music and "culture" and these now spread 
from Poland, Hungary. Czechoslovakia, Albania. Rumania and Bul- 
garia to China. Outer Mongolia and North Korea. Similar exchanges. 
but less formalized, exist among the western countries, notably 
France. Britain and America. 

^ ?p "if 

A great authority on international broadcasting is Dr. Arno Hutb. 
sometime consultant to the United Nations, lecturer at many Ameri- 
can colleges. He points out that about 600.000.000 human beings 
can be reached by radio and many of them only by radio. There are 
still a billion-and-a-half human beings who do not have any radio 
yet, and therefore do not have any effective, regularized communica- 
tion with the world. Note something more: In countries, colonies, 
islands, jungles and so on. wherever most of the inhabitants cannot 
read or write the spoken word of radio is magical to governments 
I friendly or hostile I and to commercial interests I with or without 
advertising appropriations ) . 

* * * 

Customs, tariffs and cartels do handicap international distribution 
of radio sets. A small $19 bedside radio set in America may be $80 
at retail in a European country. And it will be much worse as to TV 
sets. Indeed a recent news story out of Copenhagen told of the dis- 
couragement of the usually progressive Danes. They had launched 
but were considering the abandonment of video. Sete were pro- 
hibitivelv high. 

* * * 

The moral is plain. Radio is now and for decades to come the 
cheap, convenient and still-growing instrumentality of the world 
masses. Only in America and Britain does TV amount to much. 
New and impoverished lands like Pakistan give radio the highest 
priority, appropriate millions of dollars many might suppose could 
more advantageously (to national interest I be spent otherwise. 
( Please turn to page 1 22 I 



SPONSOR 



All It Took was Impact . . . 




... A twin-barrel salute, to remove outlaw-leader "Curley Bill" from circulation. 
Western myths to the contrary, Curly's death in an Iron Springs, Arizona shotgun duel 
with Wyatl Earp was confirmed by eyewitness reports from both outlaws and possemen 
present. 

Eyewitness reports are important to KOWH too. On-the-spot news coverage by a mobile 
unit, coupled with a news department whose three major wire services make it the only 
Independent in the nation so served, means real impact on Omaha-Council Bluffs news 
audiences! 

Sight-in on thet thar Hooper (averaged for the nine months from October, 1951, to June, 
1952), podner! If'n it don't prove impact . . . thar ain't no such critter! 

36.2% 



Largest total audience of any 
Omaha station, 8 A.M. to 6 
P.M., Monday through Satur- 
day! (Hooper, Oct., 1951 thru 
June, 1952.) 



Largest share of audience, in 
any individual time period, of 
any independent station in all 
America! (June, 1952.) 



Sta. "A" 



Sta. "B" 



OTHER 
STATION RATINGS 



Sta. "C" 



Sta. "D" 



Sta. "E" 



JZL 



iflffllf 



©MA 



"America's Most Listened- to Independent Station' 



General Manager, Todd Storz; Represented Nationally By The boiling CO. 



11 AUGUST 1952 



p 



Can you see the difference? 



» ■ 



H 



■D 



Los Angeles television viewers did ! 

Four Los Angeles channels carried the same 
picture from Chicago, but the people's choice 
was knxt! During both conventions. 

When the big speeches were made and the 
presidential candidates nominated, the knxt 
Hooper count was up to 112% larger than 
any other station's ! 

And throughout the show, knxt had the 
biggest share-of-audience by far... 12% greater 
than the second station's for the Republican 
Convention, 23% greater for the Democratic! 



35Sf5 



%?, 




This convention sweep comes as no surprise. 
knxt's daytime share-of-audience is up 
83% and its nighttime share up 39%, May 
over November, according to arb. 

If you want to get on the best bandwagon in 
the nation's second TV market, get on knxt. 
For details and availabilities, just ask your 
CBS Television Spot Sales representative, 



the new Channel 2 w\ IV ^V I 

Los Angeles ■ CBS Owned 
Represented by CBS Television Spot Sales 




Results . . Results . . Results 




The scene above marked the opening of 
the 1952 Brandeis "Housewares Fair" 

Dishpans or Mink Coats 
KMTV Selis Them in 
The Omaha Area ! 

Sales for the 1952 J. L. Brandeis 
"Housewares Fair" enjoyed a 
30% increase over the record- 
breaking 1951 "Fair." Remote 
telecasts, originating from the 
store, were seen by thousands 
of Omaha women. Mr. Meyer 
Rubin, Merchandise Mgr. of the 
Home Furnishings Dept. at- 
tributes a great part of the suc- 
cess to the way the "Fair" was 
advertised and publicized over 
KMTV, and said that KMTV 
will play an important part in 
future advertising planning. 

Fur Business Tops! 

Mr. Thomas Vaughan, Mgr. of 
Thcmsen Furriers, Omaha says: 
"We felt that we should add 
TV to the Spring Fur Storage 
campaign. One spot per week 
for 6 weeks was purchased on 
KMTV — the only change from 
our '51 schedule. Results: We 
had more Spring business and 
more new customers than in any 
previous year." 

Let KMTV sell YOUR product in 
the rich Omaha area. Contact the 
Katz Agency or KMTV today- 



KIHTV 



CBS 

DUMONT 

ABC 



OMAHA 2, NEBRASKA 
CHANNEL 3 

Represented by KATZ AGENCY 



Madison 

w 



CORRECTION 

Just a line to say that in looking over 
\ our excellent publication. July 2oth is- 
sue, page I. I note a rumor that we 
might be open to a new agency con- 
nection. May I say that, as of the 
present writing, the rumor is wholly in 
error. 

Fred Cartoun 

Chairman of the Board 
Longines-Wittnauer Watch Co. 
New York 



NEGRO PROGRAMING 

We were shocked to see in your 2o 
July issue that WSAI is listed as a sta- 
tion carrying 50/( of programs 
beamed to the Negro audience. This 
is not true. 

WSAFs programs are designed to 
appeal to all the rich greater Cincin- 
nati market of two and one-half mil- 
lion people. While some of our pro- 
grams may hold a particular appeal 
for this group or that one, our overall 
programing objective is to reach every 
bit of this homogeneous market. More 
than two-score new sponsors added 
since last year and a thumping 20' , 
increase in volume over 1951 prove 
that this programing policy pays off 
for advertisers. Our listeners tell us we 
have succeeded in this and sales rec- 
ords of our sponsors support this ((in- 
clusion. 

We have one excellent program fea- 
turing a Negro disk jockey late at 
night, a remote pick-up from a restau- 
rant in Cincinnati's Negro section. The 
Pulse shows that this program enjoys 
a rating which necessarily must in- 
clude many persons beyond the Negro 
market because there are just not that 
many Negroes in this area. Sponsors 
on the program tell us that a large 
number of their customers reached 
through the program, come from all 
walks of life regardless of race or 
creed. We have many fine friends 
among Cincinnati Negroes and we arc 
proud of this excellent program. 

But we hasten to correct the impres- 
sion that WSAI. serving the needs of 
two and otic-half million people daily, 
is beamed to any narrow segment of 
the market. A glance at our program 



schedule should serve to illustrate the 
enormous breadth of appeal reached 
by WSAFs programs. 

We trust this letter may serve to set 
the record straight among your excel- 
lent magazines many readers who may 
have been misled by this unfortunate 
error. 

J. Robert Kerns 
Managing Director 
WSAI, Cincinnati 



TV BASICS 

If. as we hope, you are going to re- 
print as a separate booklet TV Basics, 
as appearing in your 14 July, 1952 is- 
sue, we would very much appreciate 
leceiving half a dozen copies for use 
among the executives of this office. 

Would you please advise me if this 
request can be fulfilled. 

R. Wells Brown 
/. Walter Thompson 
Detroit 

• TV Basics i» available in reprint form al lOr 
P«-r copy in quantities <if 101> or more; 15c for 25 
or more; 25. per single copy. 



FALL FACTS ISSUE 

I am in receipt of your publicity re- 
lease which makes available additional 
copies of the sixth issue of "Fall 
Facts." I have already looked over my 
copy and find it one of the most in- 
teresting and informative documents 
on television and its outlook on the all- 
important fall of '52. 

Vincent Royve 

Ted Bates & Company 



1 think that the Fall Facts issue of 
SPONSOR is terrific. Thanks for send- 
ing it along. 

I was especially interested in the 

questions and answers, and the charts. 

Congratulations for a wonderful job. 

Bernard C. Duffy, Pres. 

BBDO 

New York 



As subscribers to SPONSOR, I would 
appreciate receiving four extra copies 
of \our Fall Facts issue. Kindly send 
the copies and your bill marked to the 
personal attention of the writer. 

C. Burt Oliver, V.P. 

Foote, Cone & Belding 

New York 



10 



SPONSOR 



COVERAGE PATTERN, KNBC, 
50,000 watt, non-directional, 
"wide circle" coverage that 
not only blankets the great 
San Francisco-Oakland area 
metropolitan markets — but 
all the thriving PLUS-Markets 
of Northern California. 



COVERAGE PATTERN, the 

two other 50,000 watt ^ 

directional stations. X 




y 



COVERAGE PATTERN, television 
... 60 mile radius . . . about V^rd 
of the families owning sets. 



In Northern California... 
KNBC reaches more people, more often, than 
any other radio or TV station. This wide 
circle coverage plus program popularity 
make KNBC, San Francisco, 
Northern California's No. 1 

Advertising Medium 



. 50,000 WATTS • NON-DIRECTIONAL • 680 KC • REPRESENTED BY NBC SPOT SALES . 
11 AUGUST 1952 11 




And works is the word which perfectly describes Eddy Jason, Wis- 
consin's best-known Radio personality. 

Been with us 12 years. Heads one of our Theatrical Units (5-piece 
Band thrown in) called Town Hall Players. He writes Plays (excellent) 
— Songs (fair) — Poetry (awful). Both Eddy and Town Hall are now 
part of Wisconsin's good living. 

Last year, in 317 personal appearances throughout our Primary, 
Eddy and his Town Hall Gang played to more than 177,000 paid 
admissions. And their recordings for Juke Boxes have become big 
favorites in 17 Counties. 

In addition to his personal appearances, Eddy handles our 5-7 AM 
slot, as well as our Homemakers' Hour . . . and a 15-minute segment 
at noon. 

Yep, we really mean it: "This Guy Works For Us" . . . and how! 



Wisconsin's most show -full station 



I 



IN 



Green Bay 

HAYDN R. EVANS, Gen. Mgr. 
Represented By WEED & COMPANY 



5000 WATTS 



-J- G RE *. ., 

Iff* K 



Y 




© W B A Y 



12 



SPONSOR 



Many thanks tor sending me a copy 
of sponsor's Fall Facts annual. It is 
quite an issue and contains a lot of 
material that will be extremely help- 
ful to us. 

Harry Parnas, Media Director 
Cecil & Presbrey, Inc. 
New York 



Please send to my attention two ad- 
ditional copies of your sixth annual 
"Fall Facts." 

Without question this issue is the 
finest compendium of radio-TV basic 
data ever assembled. 

Dale Taylor, Gen. mgr. 

WENY 

Elmira, N. Y. 



I would very much appreciate your 
sending the 14 July issue of sponsor 
magazine to: Miss Arlene Gilbert, 28 
First Avenue, Bay Shore, L. I.. New 
York. 

I think it is an unusually excellent 
issue with some very good informa- 
tion in it. 

Arlene Gilbert 

WGSM 

Huntington, N. Y. 



SPONSOR certainly deserves a double 
orchid for the 6th Annual Fall Facts 
issue which has just come to my desk. 
Naturally, I have not had an opportu- 
nity to thoroughly digest all of its con- 
tents, but a casual review indicates two 
courses which I propose to take and I 
consider could be well taken by every- 
one who has an interest whatever in the 
business of radio and television : 

The first is to read it thoroughly, to 
get an overall picture of the many facts 
this issue contains. The second is to 
keep it always handy as an authorita- 
tive reference book an many phases of 
radio and television, which to my 
knowledge have never been covered by 
any other publication or assembled col- 
lectively between the covers of a single 
book. 

Murray Grabhorn 
Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 
New York 



We want to congratulate you on the 
most thorough 6th Annual Fall Facts 
issue. Its contents are both concise 
and helpful and give us a clear picture 
of current and future AM and TV po- 
tentials. 

Leslie L. Kennon, Asst. mgr. 

KWTO 

Springfield, Mo. 



I don't want to fail to tell you — in 
the rush of other things — what a ter- 
rific job I think you did with your 
Fall Facts issue. 

I read it cover to cover last night 
and ... it is good! 

Jerome Sill, General Manager 

WMIL 

Milwaukee 



Your 240-page Fall Facts issue is a 
splendid thing. 

Please accept this evidence of con- 
gratulations. 

Rogan Jones 
KVOS 
Bellingham. Wash. 



Please send 2 extra copies of the Fall 
Facts issue. This is just the textbook 
we need . . . and now is the time! It's 
wonderful to get these figures in time 
for fall planning. 

N. E. Stone 
WMIT-FM 
Charlotte, N. C. 



TV SETS IN MIAMI 

The reverse of your television map 
Fall 1952 which appears in your 14 
July 1952 issue lists 87,000 sets in the 
Miami market. 

As early as February 18, 1952, ac- 
cording to Telecasting survey appear- 
ing in Broadcasting Telecasting for that 
date lists 105.000 sets in this market. 
The 7 July issue of the same magazine 
lists 119.500 sets in the Miami trading 
area. 

I should appreciate it if you would 
tell me what you think is the reason for 
[Please turn to page 134) 



PINPOINT 

YOUR 
PERSISTENT 

SALESMAN 




SELLING PROSPEROUS 

SOUTHERN NEW ENGLAND 

with 

UNDUPLICATED COVERAGE 

in 220,000 HOMES! 

WJAR-TV 

Providence 

Represented Nationally by 

Weed Television 

In New England — Bertha Bannan 



11 AUGUST 1952 



13 




YOU 

CHOOSE 
CkNfcDM 
FIRST 
STATION... 



Refail Sales u 
CFCF local sal< 



y««K I CFCF fUhi ' ,_„ 

up less ttiaw ib/o 

CFCF ; 

In CanA<J«», All'Cetiuuf*. 




fcftiiw 



John Jfi. Fox 

President 
Minute Maid Corp., New York 

As vice president-business manager of the National Research Cor- 
poration of Boston in 1943 John Fox worked with scientists on such 
technical problems as high vacuum coating of ordnance optics, and 
atomic fission. In this world of research Minute Maid was born. 

National Research had been working on high-vacuum techniques 
of processing for scores of food manufacturers. This interested Fox 
who had a pet project of his own — the development of methods for 
quick freezing orange juice. 

Fox, who'd sold shoes and insurance, managed a gas station and 
laundry during his college days, recognized it as a business "natural." 
He and his associates formed the nucleus of a public corporation 
soon to be nationally known as Minute Maid. Business acumen was 
needed; Fox, who'd been an IBM sales manager, was made president. 

As for the product, Fox knew quick-frozen orange juice was some- 
thing the housewife would welcome. It was a frequent-sale item with 
established general channels of distribution. 

A series of production and advertising misadventures ensued be- 
tween 1945 and 1948 before Minute Maid found the solution in 
radio. Bing Crosby, a major Minute Maid stockholder, made a 
series of platters for use in leading markets across the country. These 
15-minute, five-times-a-week shows caught the imagination of day- 
time listeners by featuring top-name guests entertaining and word- 
jousting with "The Groaner." Almost overnight, sales went up. 

By 1951 Minute Maid was "big time" with sponsorship of Kate 
Smith on NBC TV, Gayelord Hauser on ABC TV and Crosby on ra- 
dio. This summer the Gabby Hayes Show on NBC TV heralds Minute 
Maid frozen lemonade and a lemonade stand kit premium for young- 
sters. It brings Minute Maid's annual ad expenditure to well over 
$1,000,000, with half invested in TV (through Ted Bates). 

Says Fox: "Our margin of profit has narrowed greatly but volume 
is what counts. We make sure of continuing volume through broad- 
cast advertising." 

This is borne out by Minute Maid's seven-year sales gross of 
$150,000,000. Fox doesn't ease up although Minute Maid is the 
sales leader against competitors like Snow Crop. Flamingo and Birds 
Eye. When he does find time to get away from business pressures, 
he sails on Long Island sound with his wife and four children. * * * 



14 



SPONSOR 



POWERFUL 

IN THE DETROIT MARKET 




ife pMstige 



Top CBS programs keep Detroit sets tuned to Channel 2! 
Your sales message reaches more listeners . . . more 
interested listeners on WJBK-TV, the station that carries 
a majority of the shows that are tops in popularity 
by survey ratings. 



in pM^mimUu 



Tops in music, news and sports with the Detroit radio 
audience. Key station for the largest baseball network 
ever created, broadcasting all Detroit Tiger games. 




ffe pAOhtCtiOH 



Facts on tVic rich Detroit market at your command 
through WJBK's dynamic sales promotion department. 
Dealer and distributor tie-ins arranged to promote 
your sales. 

and soon . . . 

MORE POWER to WJBK 

It's in the works! 10,000 watts days, 5,000 watts 
nights for WJBK, just as soon as construction can be 
completed. That means an even larger market . . . even 
more sales through "The Station With a Million Friends." 



A STORER STATION 
CBS and DUM0NT Television . . . Tops in MUSIC, NEWS and SPORTS on Radio 



National Sales Mgr., TOM HARKER, 488 Madison, New York 22, ELDORADO 5-2455 

Represented Nationally by THE KATZ AGENCY 



II AUGUST 1952 



15 



RCA'sTV 







■- 



f oes the most 



-VHFarUHF! 



4 PROGRAM SERVICES 

_ no local studios needed ! 



• Network programs 

• Local films (16mm) 

• "Stills" from local slide projector 

• Test pattern from monoscope 
(including individualized station 
pattern in custom-built tube) 



J.HIS PICTURE ILLUSTRATES 
what we think is the minimum equip- 
ment a TV station should have to start 
with— and earn an income. The arrange- 
ment can handle any TV show received 



from the network and provides station 
identification and locally inserted com- 
mercials as required. In addition, it offers 
an independent source of revenue — by 
including film and slide facilities for 
handling local film shows and spots, or 
network shows on kine recordings. 

The Basic Buy includes: A transmitter 
and an antenna (necessary for any TV 
station); monitoring equipment (re- 
quired by FCC); film and slide equip- 
ment (for local programs — and extra 
income); monoscope camera for repro- 
ducing a test pattern of known quality 
(important for good station operation 
and as an aid to receiver adjustment); 
and a control console that saves operator 
time and effort (it enables one technical 



man to run the station during nearly 
all "on-air" periods). 
RCA's Basic Buy can be used in combi- 
nation with any RCA TV transmitter 
and antenna, of any power — VHF or 
UHF. Matched design and appearance 
make it easy to add facilities any time 
(you need never discard one unit of a 
basic package). And note this: RCA BASIC 
Units Are Identical To The RCA 
Units Used In The Biggest TV 
Stations! 

RCA's Basic Buy is already being 
adopted by many TV station planners. 
Let your RCA Sales Representative 
work out a flexible package like this for 
you — show you how to do the most with 
the least equipment! 



This is what the BASIC BUY includes! 



































1 








\ 








J TRANSMITTER 




IHJ 


Isi 





FILM MULTIPLEXER 
AND SLIDE PROJECTOR 



IB - 



FILM AUDIO-VIDEO REMOTE •» 
CAMERA CONTROL CONTROL CONTROL 


PREVIEW 
MONITOR 


^■jDjUB^Bja 


, ^ 






[ ) 

an . .oo 

o a i 


O ' o 

ooo o 


1 ) 




. .11 


oooooo 




I ) 



SIO-D 

POWLR \ 


WA-3A 
GRATING 
GENERATOR 


SUPPLY 
MM 

POWER 
SUPPLY 
MM 

POWER 
SUPPLY 


TK-11 

MONOSCOPE 
CAMERA 

VIDEO JACK PANEL 
BLANK 






WP-33B 
POWER 
SUPPLY 

WM3l' ' 

'-■': rowK.- 

SUPPLY 

WP-33B 
' POWEt. .'■ 


■ WA-21A 
- VIDEO SWEEP 
TA-SC •, 

STABILIZING '• 
AMPLIFIER 

TA-SC 
STABILIZING 
AMPLIFIER. 

BLANK 




EM MONITOR - 


11-11 

METER PANEL 


BW4AI/AH 

FOR VHF 

OR 

8WU-6A 
FOR UHF 

WF-SOB FREQ. 
MONITOR 


BA-iA 
LIMITING AMP 


BA-13A 
PROGRAM AMP. 


4-BA-NA 

PREAMPLIFIERS 






WF-49C FREO 1 
DEV. METER 


AUDIO JACK PANELS 


•■^hb^m^kII 


HT""1H 


BLANK 

WM-71A DISTOR- 
TION AND NOISE 


16MM SOUND EO 
BA-14A 


MONITORING 
AMPLIFIER 


WA-2BA PUSH- 
BUTTON OSC 


BLANK 


■ 


^^ ^^_ | | MbKHMB 





BLANK II powt R SU p PlT 




B— B— 



RADIO CORPORATION of AMERICA 



ENGINEERING PRODUCTS DEPARTMENT 



CAM DEN. N.J. 



2,252 requests... 

or one bank run that made the bankers happy! 

After sponsoring Movietime on WSM-TV for several months, 
the First American National Bank of Nashville decided to 
find out just how much audience this Sunday night feature 
really had. 

On the May 4th program, a small plastic dime savings bank 
was offered to anyone who would stop by any one of 
American's 14 branches and ask for it. 

By the end of banking hours Monday, May 5, 2252 banks had 
been given out. Four of the 14 branches had their supply 
completely exhausted. This, in spite of the fact that they were 
kept out of sight and given out only when asked for 
specifically! In addition, mail requests were received from 94 
towns in Tennessee and Kentucky. 

Irving Waugh, or any Petry Man, has other equally 
outstanding stories of WSM-TV's ability to produce. Better 
hear them before you do any advertising in the Nashville 
Market. 

Nashville 

WSM-TV 

Channel 4 




SPONSOR 



IVB^HH 



MSI! 



New and renew 



1 AUGUST 1 952 



1. 



2. 



i\ew on Tele vis 

SPONSOR 



C.itsp.iw Rubber Co 
Florida Citrus Commission 
French Sardine Co 

Hotpoint Co 

Andrew jergens Co 
Lambert Co 

Penick & Ford Ltd Inc 
Pillsbury Mills Inc 

Standard Brands Inc 
Westinghouse Electric Corp 

Westinghouse Electric Corp 



• on Networks 

AGENCY 



S. A. Levyne 

| Walter Thompson 

Rhoades & Davis 

Maxon Inc 

Robert W. Orr 
Lambert & Feasley 

BBDO 

Leo Burnett 

Compton 

Ketcham, MacLeod & 

Crove 
Ketcham, MacLeod & 

Crove 



STATIONS 



CBS TV 
DuMont 
CBS TV 

ABC TV 

CBS TV 
ABC TV 

NBC TV 
CBS TV 

NBC TV 
CBS TV 

DuMont 



53 

29 

64 

29 
64 

29 
25 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Quiz Kids; alt Sun 4-4:30 pm ; 14 Oct; 7 wks 
Happy's Party; Sat 11-11:30 am; 6 Sep; 17 wks 
Arthur Godfrey Time; T. Th 10-10:15 am; 2 Sep- 

52 wks 
Adventures of Ozzie & Harriet; alt F 8-8:30 pm 

3 Oct; 20 wks 
It's News to Mc; F 10:30-11 pm ; 7 Nov; 52 wks 
Adventures of Ozzie & Harriet; alt F 8-8:30 pm 

3 Oct; 20 wks 
Kate Smith Show; Th 4:15-30 pm ; 2 Oct; 52 wks 
Arthur Codfrey Time; M, Th 10:45-11 am; 1 Sep- 

52 wks 
Howdy Doody; Th 5:45-6 pm; 18 Sep; 39 wks 
Pick the Winner, Th 9-9:30 pm; 14 Aug; 13 wks 

Pick the Winner, Th 9-9:30 pm ; 14 Aug; 13 wks 



Reneived on Television Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



American Tobacco Co 
Bendix Home Appliances 
Div of Avco Mfg Corp 
Campbell Soup Co 
Colgatc-Palmolive-Pcet Co 

Colgate-Palmolive-Peet Co 
Ceneral Cigar Co 
Clidden Co 
International Shoe Co 

Ironrite Inc 

Owens-Corning Fiberglas 

Corp 
Procter & Camble Co 

RCA Victor 

Schlitz Brewing Co 

C. A. Swanson & Sons 

Sweets Co of America Inc 

U- S. Tobacco Co 

Wine Corp of America 



BBDO 
Tatham-Laird 

Ward Wheelock 
William Esty 

Sherman & Marquette 
Young b Rubicam 
Meldrum Cr Fewsmith 
D'Arcy 

Brooke, Smith, French 

& Dorrance 
Fuller & Smith & Ross 

Dancer-Fitzgerald- 
Sample 
|, Walter Thompson 

Lennen & Mitchell 

Tatham-Laird 

Moselle & Eisen 

Kudner 

Weiss & Celler 



STATIONS 



CBS TV 61 
ABC TV 52 

NBC TV 
CBS TV 60 

CBS TV 59 
CBS TV 46 
NBC TV 
DuMont 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



ABC TV 
CBS TV 
ABC TV 
NBC TV 
CBS TV 
ABC TV 
ABC TV 
NBC TV 
DuMont 



15 
29 
32 

62 
52 
29 
64 



Biff Baker U.S.A.; Th 9-9:30 pm ; 6 Nov; 52 wks 
The Name's the Same alt W 7:30-8 pm; 10 Sep; 

52 wks 
Aldrich Family; F 9:30-10 pm ; 5 Sep; 52 wks 
Strike It Rich; M, W, F 11:30-12 noon; 30 |une; 

52 wks 
Strike It Rich; W 9-9:30 pm; 2 Jul; 52 wks 
Sports Spot; W 10:45-11 pm; 4 June; 52 wks 
Kate Smith; F 4:30-45 pm; 12 Sep; 13 wks 
Kids and Company; Sat 11:30-12 noon; 9 Aug; 52 

wks 
Hollywood Screen Test; M 7:30-8 pm; 25 Aug; 52 

wks 
Arthur Codfrey Time; alt T, Th and M, W 10:15- 

30 am ; 2 Sep; 52 wks 
Beulah; T 7:30-8 pm; 30 Sep; 52 wks 

Kukla, Fran & Ollie; alt Sun 6-6:30 pm; 24 Aug; 

52 wks 
Schlitz Playhouse of Stars; F 9-9:30 pm; 4 Jul; 

52 wks 
The Name's the Same; alt W 7:30-8 pm; 10 Sep; 

52 wks 
Tootsie Hippodrome; Sat 12:15-30 pm; 3 Aug; 26 

wks 
Martin Kane. Private Eye; Th 10-10:30 pm; 28 

Aug; 52 wks 
Charlie Wild, Private Detective; T 9-9:30 pm; 2 

Sep; 44 wks 



3, 



Station Representation Changes 

STATION AFFILIATION 



KOLT, Scottsbluff, 


Neb 


CBS 


WBRE, Wilkes-Barre 




NBC 


WCAN. Milwaukee 




ABC 


WELI, New Haven 




ABC 


WCY, Schenectady 




NBC 


WNEL, San Juan, Puerto Rico 


Independent 


WPDQ. Jacksonville 




ABC 



NEW NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



Cill-Keefe & Perna, N. Y. 
Headley-Reed Co. N. Y. 
O. L Taylor Co, N. Y 
H-R Representatives, N. Y. 
Henry I. Christal Co, N. Y. 
H-R Representatives, N. Y. 
O. L. Taylor Co, N. Y. 



4. 



Dlew and Renewed Spot Television 

SPONSOR I AGENCY NET OR STATION 



Best Foods Inc 
Brown & Williamson To- 
bacco Corp 



Benton & Bowles 
Ted Bates 



WNBT. N. Y. 
WBZ-TV. Boston 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



1-min partic; 29 Sep; 26 wks (n) 
10-sec stn break; 29 Jul; 52 wks (rl 



In next issue: New and Renewed on Networks, New National Spot Radio Business, 
National Broadcast Sales Executives, Sponsor Personnel, New Agency Appointments 







.\umbers after names 
refer to New and Re- 
new category 



G. 


T. 


Duram 


(5) 


S. 


\l. 


Sutter 


(5) 


It 


L, 


Spencer 


(5) 


II 


l> 


Fish er 


(5) 


11. 


H 


Jaeger 


(5) 



11 AUGUST 1952 



19 



11 AUGUST 1952 



i\ew and renew 








SPONSOR 




AGENCY 


Brown & Williamson 


To- 




uacco Corp 




Russcl M. Seeds 


B.own & Williamson 


To- 




uacco Co/p 




Ted Bates 


Brown & Williamson 


To- 




bacco Corp 




Ted Bates 


Brown & Williamson 


To- 




bacco Corp 




Ted Bates 


Cirr Consolidated Biscuit Co 


BBDO 



Licneral Baking Co 
General Foods Corp 
Ceneral Foods Corp 
Hudson Pulp & Paper Co 
Hudson Pulp & Paper Co 
Hudson Pulp & Paper Co 
Hudson Pulp & Paper Co 
Hudson Pulp & Paper Co 
Hudson Pulp & Paper Co 
Land O'Lakes Creameries Inc 
Lever Brothers Co 
Lewis-Howe Co 

Lewis-Howe Co 

Rapidol Distributing Corp 

Serutan Co 
Standard Brands Inc 
Standard Brands Inc 
Standard Brands Inc 
Standard Brands Inc 
Westfield Planters Coopera- 
tive Fruit Products Inc 



BBDO 

Young & Rubicam 

Young & Rubicam 

Biow 

Biow 

Biow 

Biow 

Biow 

Biow 

Campbell-Mithun 

). Walter Thompson 

Dancer-Fitzgerald- 
Sample 

Dancer-Fitzgerald- 
Sample 

Dowd, Redfield & 
Johnstone 

Franklin Bruck 

Compton 

Compton 

Compton 

Compton 

Kastor. Farrcll. 

Chesley & Clifford 



NET OR 


STATION 


WDTV. 


Pittsb. 


WNBK. 


Cleve. 


WPTZ, 


Phila. 


WPTZ, 


Phila. 


WDTV, 


Pittsb. 


WNBK, 


Cleve. 


KNBH. 


Hlywd. 


WNBT, 


N. Y. 


WBZ-TV. Boston 


WNBK, 


Cleve. 


WNBQ. 


Chi. 


WNBW 


Wash, D.C. 


WPTZ. 


Phila. 


WRCB. 


Schen. 


WDTV, 


Pittsb. 


WRCB. 


Schen. 


WNBQ, 


Chi. 


WPTZ, 


Phila 


WNBK, 


Cleve. 


WRCB. 


Schen. 


WBZ-TV. Boston 


WNBQ, 


Chi. 


WNBQ, 


Chi. 


WNBW 


Wash, D.C. 


WDTV. 


Pittsb. 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



1-min anncmt; 28 Jul; 26 wks ( n r 

20-sec stn break; 20 Jul; 52 wks (n) 

20-sec stn break; 20 Jul; 52 wks mi 

10-sec stn break; 20 Jul; 52 wks In) 

1-min partic; 21 Aug; 18 wks (rl 

1-hr film, Hopalong Cassidy; 19 Jul; 13 wks (r» 

1-min partic; 24 Jul; 13 wks (n) 

1-min partic; 18 Jul; 13 wks (nl 

20-sec stn break; 4 Aug; 52 wks (nl 

20-sec stn break; 4 Aug; 52 wks (nl 

20-sec stn break; 4 Aug; 52 wks (nl 

20-sec stn break; 6 Aug; 52 wks (nl 

20-sec stn break; 5 Aug; 52 wks (nl 

20-sec stn break; 5 Aug; 52 wks (n) 

20-sec anncmt; 21 Jul; 13 wks (n) 

10-sec stn break; 27 Jul; 13 wks In) 

20-sec stn break; 7 Aug; 21 wks (nl 

20-sec stn break; 5 Aug; 13 wks (r) 

15 mm prog; 23 Jul; 13 wks (n) 

Vi-hr prog .Boston Blackie; 21 Aug; 52 wks In) 

1-min anncmt; 11 Aug; 52 wks (n) 

20-sec stn break; 3 Aug; 52 wks (n) 

1-min anncmt; 5 Aug; 52 wks in) 

20-sec stn break; 21 Jul; 49 wks In) 

10-sec anncmt; 17 Jul; 13 wks (n) 



5. 



Ydvertising Agency Personnel Changes 

NAME FORMER AFFILIATION 



Fred E. Adams 
Selig J. Alkon 
Robert C. Barker 
Richard Bean 
Sam Blake 
W. P. Booth 
Payton Carroll 
Edgar W. Clark 
Bruce Dodge 
Ceorge T. Duram 
Brooks Elms 
Wm. M. Engelmann 
William D. Fisher 
Tom Frandscn 
George R. Gibson 
George H. Cuinan 
Stoirs Haynes 

Chas. Lee Hutchings 
Harold H. laeger 
Paul Lehner 
John E. Malone 
Ren A. Mearicr 

Neal Nyland 
|. Erwin Perine 
Edward B. Pope 
Geo. Howell Shields 
Mel Smith 
William L. Spencer 
Samuel M. Sutter 
loseph Thompson 
Arthur W. Weil |r 
Ward M. Wilcox 



C. M. Basford, N. Y., creative vp 

Rand, L. A., vp 

Hewitt, Ogilvy, Benson & Mather, N. Y., acct exec 

Pedlar & Ryan, N Y , media dir 

American Inventory, N. Y., spec prom, pub 

SSC&B. N. Y., exec 

Ruthrauff & Ryan, Hlywd, acct exec 

Kenyon & Eckhardt. N. Y. 

Kenyon & Eckhardt, N. Y., radio producer 

C. E. Hooper, N. Y., acct exec 

Biow Co., N Y, acct exec 

Abbott Kimball, N Y., media dir 

Gardner, St. L., radio-tv dir 

KMPC. L. A., sis mgr 

Walt Disney Productions, N. Y., merchandising mgr 

Robert W. Orr, N. Y., acct exec 

Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample. N. Y., asst radio-tv 

dept head 
French & Preston, N. Y.. copy chief 
Can Manufacturers Institute, N. Y., marketing dir 
Gardner, St. L., acct exec 
Anderson-McConnell Technical Pubis, L. A. 
General Petroleum Corp., L. A., asst adv & sis 

prom mgr 
Benton & Bowles, N. Y., vp & acct supvr 
Abbott Kimball, N. Y., acct exec 
J. Walter Thompson, N. Y., acct exec 
Gardner, St. L., acct exec 
Erwin. Wasey. L A., acct exec 
Gardner, St. L., copy chief 
William Esty, N. Y., vp-copy chief 
"Today" NBC TV. assoc prod 
Hirshon-Garfield, N. Y., exec 
Glenn. Dallas, acct exec 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Same, exec vp 

Same, N. Y.. vp 

Same, vp 

Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, media dir. P&C products 

Ettinger, N. Y.. head radio-tv dept 

Same, vp 

Hicks & Creist, L. A., mgr (new office) 

BBDO. Mnpls, acct exec 

Weiss & Celler. Chi., radio-TV dir. 

Geyer, Newell & Ganger, N. Y. , media dir 

McCann-Erickson, N. Y., acct superv, radio-tv 

Same, also vp 

Same, vp 

Irwin, L. A , vp 

Geyer, Newell & Ganger, N. Y., marketing dir 

Same, vp 

McCann-Erickson, N. Y., acct superv, radio-tv 

Creamer, Hlywd., creative dir 

Geyer, Newell & Ganger, N. Y. , vp, gen mgr 

Same, vp 

Anderson-McConnell Adv, L. A., acct exec 

Erwin. Wasey. L. A., acct exec 

Campbell-Mithun, Chi, vp, gen mgr 

Same, vp 

James Thomas Chirurg, Boston, media dir 

Same, vp 

Same, vp 

Same, vp 

Biow, N. Y., vp-copy chief 

N. W. Ayer. Hlywd. tv prod 

Same, vp 

Same, vp, head Dallas operations 



6. 



Station Changes (other than personnel ) 



KFIR, North Bend. Ore., formerly LBS, now CBS 
WCMB, Harrisburg. Pa., formerly independent, now MBS 
WCVS, Springfield, III. joined MBS; also ABC affiliate 



WJRD, Tuscaloosa, Ala., formerly LBS, now NBC 
WCTN-TV, Minneapolis, St. Paul, call letters 
changed to WCCO-TV 




Vumbers after names 
refer to New and Re- 
new category 

Tom Frandsen ( 5 ) 

G. H. Shields (5) 

I'aul Lehner (5) 

G. H. Hainan (5) 

W.M. Engelmann (5) 



/. E. Perine 
R. C. Barker 
(',. R. Gibson 
Fred, E. Adams 
Edward B. Pope 



20 





"WITH THE 
COMPLIMENTS 

of WHO. 



MA'AM! 



n 



Yes — that headline is misleading. Rather than 
giving premiums or prizes here at WHO, we are 
building tremendous good-will by helping various com- 
munity organizations throughout Iowa to get some of the 
things they want. New dishes for the P.T.A. Uniforms 
for the High School Band. Christmas toys for various 
child- welfare groups. Etc., etc., etc.! 

For instance, we quote from the Britt, Iowa Netvs- 
Tribune of March 5, 1952 : 

"It is evidently worth something to fill WHO talent 
performers with a good duck dinner to get the best 
results in entertainment. Mrs. O. W. Friedow took 
the personnel of the WHO Talent Show to her country 
home and served them a fine duck dinner Thursday 
evening just before their appearance at the school 
auditorium in a show sponsored by the Congregational 
Workers Guild. At the auditorium, a stream of folks 
moved into the lobby and 'crashed' the doors as early 
comers. By 7:15 the main auditorium was filled and 
the bleachers offered the next-best 'roost', after which 
chairs were carried in to take care of the overflow. 
About 700 people were seated. The various songs and 
farces followed one after another without any inter- 
mission. The crowd was kept in an uproar of laughter 
for two hours. The Workers Guild was well pleased 
with both entertainment and receipts." 



Just a local news item — but full of the stuff that makes 
loyal and friendly listeners for WHO — responsive 
listeners for WHO advertisers. 

WHO shows are produced in Iowa communities under 
auspices of local non-profit organizations. This has 
been going on for years. WHO has helped hundreds 
of community groups to raise money for local needs, 
with the result that literally tens of thousands of 
families have become our personal friends. 

Is it any wonder that WHO is listened-to regularly by 
69.4% (daytime) of all radio families in Iowa? For the 
complete, amazing story, contact WHO or Free & Peters ! 



W IKI © 

+/©r Iowa PLUS + 



Des Moines 



. 50,000 Watts 



Col. B. J. Palmer, President 
P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 



11 AUGUST 1952 



FREE & PETERS, INC 

{National Representatives 



21 






- .._-./. . ■ 



4% 



j^^g^ ^^Cj^ ER^S^igx^piA^^rc^ 






m-.- 



j: 




VVOtz ^cttrt-rtx 



. increased advertising . . . customer mailings . . . point-of-sale displays . . . great 



i v v 



AIAIAP 






' 




istribution for your product . . . greater sales in 2,100 St. Louis grocery stores! 






/i 

/ V 



We know what's in store for you . 



It's crystal clear! KMOX predicts bigger sales 
for you when you use Lee Adams' "Housewives' 
Protective League — Sunrise Salute" programs. 

Your participation means that your product 
will be merchandised (and more of it sold !) in 
retail stores representing virtually every chain, 
association and neighborhood grocery in 
greater St. Louis. 

Last season 2,177 grocers took part in Lee Adams' 

ANNUAL MERCHANDISING CAMPAIGN 

and featured more than a score of Lee Adams- 
advertised products — /;/ 26 newspaper ads 
representing 5,000,000 home impressions*— in 
customer mailings totaling 180,000 copies — and 
in literally thousands of store displays. 



Comments from grocers, brokers and chain 
store executives all ran like this : 

"We have had a large increase in sales " 

"The response was very gratifying. . . ." 

"We irish to com mend yon on the fine results " 

"One of the finest business builders " 

"Onr sales for that week more than doubled!" 

If you sell anything that's sold in St. Louis 
grocery stores, you'll sell more of it when you 
use the most sales-effective participating 
program in all St. Louis— Lee Adams' "HPL— 
Sunrise Salute" combination. 

Lee Adams' 1952-53 MERCHANDISING CAMPAIGN 
starts soon. To assure your sales future 
in St. Louis, better call us or CBS Radio 
Spot Sales right away. 

watts f\IYIU/V 
"The Voice of St. Louis" ■ CHS Owned 

Reprcxeiittil hi/ CHS Had in Spot Sales 



Latent availuhh- ABC circulation 




IVetf? developments on SPONSOR stories 



that count 

Look at 
prosperous, 

progressive, 

Mobile 



Metropolitan 
Population 

1940 
114,906 

1951 
231,105 

% Increase 
101% 



Bank Deposits 
1949 

$ 65,593.663 
1951 

$201,663,957 
% Increase 

207% 




and don't overlook 

0*& 



CALL 



Adam Young, Jr. 

National Representative 

or F. E. Busby 

General Manager 



ON THE Ol AL 710 






Mobile, Alabama 



24 



Four-organizction joint promotion may spearhead trend, says Seitz (names below) 

"The new network merchandising era 
is here" 

17 December 1951. p. 32 

Networks are putting more care into 
merchandising services 

When a network, a local station affiliate, a retailer and a manufac- 
turer get together in a joint promotional effort, new paths in mer- 
chandising cooperation are opened. 

NBC. its Atlanta affiliate. WSB, Colonial Stores and the Philco 
Corporation have just completed such a promotion (from 10 July to 
2 August > . utilizing the complete promotional facilities of all four 
organizations. Fred N. Dodge, merchandising director of NBC 
stated that this initial venture was an experiment to determine the 
feasibility of establishing such a pattern for use with other retailers. 

The plan worked like this: WSB carried a heavy schedule of an- 
nouncements ballyhooing the availability of advertisers' products in 
Colonial Stores, as well as the fact that each of the 34 stores in and 
around Atlanta would give awav a Philco air-conditioner to the 
lucky winner of a drawing. Colonial Stores spotlighted many WSB- 
NBC advertised food products in newspaper schedules, plugged the 
prize drawings for the air-conditioners in the ads as well as in the 
stores. At the point-of-sale, mass displays, colorful banners, shelf- 
talkers, price cards, shopping cart cards tied in the station call letters, 
I he program times and the advertisers' products. All point-of-sale 
material was worked out by the NBC with Colonial Stores. 

The plan for the promotion was evolved during a discussion be- 
tween J. T. McConnell. general merchandiser of Colonial Stores; 
Frank Gaither. station manager of WSB; and Loy R. Lee. Atlanta 
merchandising representative of NBC. 

At a dinner tendered by NBC to the other three participating 
organizations on 9 July in Atlanta I just before the promotion was 
launched I. Joseph Seitz. president of Colonial Stores stated that it 
was, to his knowledge, the first time such an effort has been under- 
taken by network radio; he predicted that this new advertising pat- 
tern in which network radio, local affiliate, retailer and manufac- 
turer join hands, might well be a common one in the future. 

The photo above shows the key men involved in the plan 1 1, to r. I : 
John M. Outler. WSB general manager; Joseph Seitz; Fred N. 
Dodge; W. C. Moseley, vice president, Colonial Stores. 

SPONSOR 




Daytime \U Hours Nighttime '/j Hours 



8:00 

KPRC 


A.M. to 6:00 P.M. 

26 


Monc 


ay through Sunday 

40 




Network Station B 


10 




22 


"'■*v-:?0fi- 


Network Station C 


4 




4 1 




Network Station D 


O 




18 






HOUSTON 



There's NO CONTEST between the 
rating services in Houston! Hooperat- 
ings through many years have been 
positively confirmed by Houston's 
First PULSE REPORT (April-May 1952) 
showing that now, as it has been for 
27 years, KPRC is FIRST! 



NBC and TQN on the Gulf Coast 
JACK HARRIS, General Manager 
11 AUGUST 1952 



Nationally Represented by EDWARD PETRY & CO. 



25 



rN l4iNN|APOLIS, ST. PAUL 

ed T- V/Xtfncetttrated B.P. 

/ 




wise 




(BUYING POWER) 



TWO MINNESOTA 
COUNTIES WITH HALF 
OF THE STATE'S RETAIL 
PURCHASES! 



Hennepin and Ramsey 
Counties (Minneapolis 
and St. Paul) represent 
one-third of Minnesota's 
population — and one- 
half its retail buying 
power. 

Add the other counties in 
the Channel 4 Primary 
— and you have the key 
to the 6th largest U. S. 
market. 

— and, since Minneapolis 
and St. Paul are the 
twin distributing cen- 
ters, the men who decide 
what brands retailers 
carry live here and watch 
television on Channel 4. 




In Hennepin and Ramsey Counties — 

49.7% of Minnesota's Retail Food Sales 

Don't confuse market conditions in the Twin Cities with 
those in eastern and southern areas. If you don't sell in 
Minneapolis and St. Paul, you can't sell profitably in our 
other towns. 

In Hennepin and Ramsey Counties — 

54.3% off Minnesota's Retail Drug Sales 

In the Channel 4 (WTCN) primary is where your cash crop 
is located. Drug stores in the 20 county primary do 61.4% 
of Minnesota's Drug business. 

In Channel 4 Land — The Gray Area On The Map — 

55.5% off All Retail Sales 

Concentrated Buying Power around the Twin City Area! 
Concentrated T-V selling on WTCN-TV (Channel 4) 
And — as Minneapolis-St. Paul buys ... so buys Minnesota! 
Let our representatives prove it! 




<!t0b 



**sc* 



The Men Who Buy What Minnesotans 
Try Can Be Reached On Channel 4 

For example . . . T. G. Harrison, 
President of Winston and Newell 
Co., guides the policy and the 
buying. His firm sells over 
$60,000,000.00 in foods each year. 
Super Valu and U-Save Food 
Stores — 606 top flite independent 
grocers — operate in Minnesota, 
North and South Dakota, Iowa, 
and Wisconsin. 

Mr. Harrison lives in Minne- 
apolis — and says "I consistently 
watch fights, news and many 
other excellent shows on Channel 
4— WTCN-TV." 



ST. PAUL 
MINNEAPOLIS 



CBS • ABC • DUMONT (Affiliate) 



Nationally represented by FREE & PETERS 




26 



SPONSOR 



11 AUGUST 1952 



'efauver Believes He Has Proved 
\e Can Be All Things to All Men 



aymend Moley 




MacArthur ''•■/-p— 
Liked by Taft : "/ilioisan 

In 2nd Spot 'Gives Hint 
'He'd Run 



■'KINNEY WARNING 
GIVEN STEVENSON 

Presidency |, Seen Pouible 
Only for Tliose Who 'Work'— 
Douglas' Name Advanced 



Senator Predicts Victory ] 

in November Election 

if Nominated 



, WAeHINH.Tn»j, j uni . 

i-sajs 

■' unmistak*W« torn 

lw would be pl-».vj !.-, tail I 
era! ot ttu> Anny Dvm;ta, 
;AiLhur m ft Republican ri 



peechet and 
n vote*. 

rntfi ij> almost as 
rmioi ai that of 

■ 



•■kfd dbnut report* that 
binadojj wm untie: coi 

wp '■•» quit* a flfVct" 
M i 'It would b* eniueh up , i 
ie era! MaAArthur." Ou Cbfau. 



jUan, 

■■ . ■ 



| 9 .g ,erwf MacAr.hur.'- the O.wwn ft. 

■-< «hr -If- Mowm* broadly ■'«!», t d( 
,.- trow whether he « H 

t - TO* V.'AMIi *!,-.„.. I .... L... 



. . 



B To* v.ord.1 slipped out'oefo.,. „ 
idVctorj 1*9**°* Wta *<>Ie to 



tad i 



to. V 



<1U.-M t( „, ,„,,,. ,, ir obvWua 

Cal reason*, h- could not cnmn>»iv 

- hd"»e yic«| president)*] nomination 

n -. = ., : T"Ui Incident tin ih. \i..._. 



'nee* p 



.-J^fOBt 



ih* NftUonst Ti .... ... 

Pftnv n ^M,, 

1 *'*s th* more .'H-^mpi _ 

ritt lux note* 

Spiral 

Army Dwi K h' 
running 



„ Mid th&i 



|i '™ wd 'Bbout Oeaei 
tor* the member "l D p .,„,„„ 

Other P.ilni, Made 

Other po, nLs niad e b v the ^ai»J tovernor. 

is final ftpprarar^e in wT.t m e >W 

n a on'e^.,*i ™ ^ ^ cfi3».2Sl^ 



■ >N kpni u b«iu. 
i)fl u ■( UUnoti wu 

:<■ ft ,*!**; bit- 

•ij'L nominee 

I I , ■ ,- r. . n 

■•] Chaintun, warned 

W lid gal tO tii- Wlnt. 

rtrkf 1 " 1 ■ hB *" W ' ,1Jln * " l " 

The i'h.t ; i maa '» comment wm> 

17*. Ji 8 J? 8 *** dlacu.wjn>; Gov 



SWS0NW0NT'«™iwm 
SAY FLATLY HE'LL ° 
REJECT PAW BIO 
FDR PRESIDENCY 



Pica to McGrath on Ship Deft 1 

Preceded Appointment for 

Clean. Up. Sawyer Says 

VASinNCTC 

■ 

that In It 
h« had Baked th« [hen 
Governor Asaert* It 1* ' Howai 

Bridge I Cant Lros»wn 3 long before Mi 

„ ." ... i -i i- 'PP '"***" h»d the Federal < 

Yet, See* Little Likeli- 

■ Tt i_i \l/-ll neth 8 Ki 

hood 1 hat Me W;U 



PRESIDENCY 

Not On Platter' 



r " Inj Man, K tVord ' 
"' ' '."ik McKinney. 




Stevenson 'No' Is Sho 
of Refusing Nominat 



Illinois Governor Top 



Favorite in Proph* 






Chairman or Demo 

Board Evades Qm . 
On Illinois Man 

|ne Nat,, 




Democratic Nominee 

H> MM! 

Waahliiftoi 

■ 
Hying "no'" Sunday to I 

■ 
"Democratic nomination ti 
dent. But he didn't awnd a bit HW- 
■ 
n T. ihermao on Hie tS4 
q 

A reporter a-sked the Wc 
point blank o 



N'jitJoni in J«i 

■ 

■ 
feruiR tothr I - 
to the natlor: 

■ - . 

offer if he 



party. 









adnnmMtration. 

Immehse popular)! 
parttfTi In M ■ 

n the 1952 r 

The politir^l le^'l-* 
Democratic party do rv 

run lor the prwu 

ni«Kcs « h 
nor prwid<*s 



i ahow Sunday, 
"^WilJ you say you will not ac- 
cept the i : 

: not say thai." St> 
replied. 

That about sum* up what the j 
alert, young, middle o( ihe cf>*<\ 
covemor from Springileid 
waa aayinc to hi- 
ts well as publicly her.- 
Andwhttj 
ha 1 ..' liked to se 
■ 
man decided to pass nn Saturday < 

*-hat he cafd wti dtvi naon lau* ai 

lesa enough to make him th ha» of toe i 

vortte candidate of the political A-ampaiRn with unusual 
prophets here Sundaj ' r sn ^ how wvU h 'i 

■ 

H '« h M '"' "' I '■* 'His indefW 

Stevenson is hn:h on the list of mainlined 
IVmocratic fax.rmes — if not at ' „ , 

I -Dccauaehel i.ni>oin B . 

mrers the Democratic party"! If Mr Truman had r 

At it takes to wm elec- dorwd him, he would tr 

Uonatnthiso h Ke been taK«ed as 

As th« gowrnor of a populous I _,..._. . 
mrdflleV.- P atem state. *ith • good «™*idet* -* l«bel w 
ord and a mod- [>oi have been an um* 




BY BECOMING NEWS SOURCE, SHOW BUILDS PRESTIGE, AUDIENCE. HENCE IT IS LOOKED TO FOR BIG POLITICAL STATEMENTS 

Revere: $1,000,000 V 
sponsor without a sales problem 

Metals firm pot-and-pan line has90% of market and copper shortage 
limits sales growth but ad policy is to build name for future 



■pa. a The harassed agencymen 
VV sweating oul the Inn l\ -bui l\ 
of day-to-day competition 
must often look with yearning at the 
television advertising of Revere Copper 
and Brass. Inc. For Revere's ad copy 
— cool, assured, serene — must seem 
high above the heat of battle and far 
from the loud hawking of the bustling 
marketplace. 

To Revere, its TV showcase, Meet 
the Press (Sunday. 7:30 to 8:00 p.m. 
on NBC) is a vehicle whose primary 
purpose is to softly peddle its greatest 
product: the Revere name. There are 
four basic explanations for this current 
institutional strategy. 

1. With copper in short supplj and 

11 AUGUST 1952 



the Government allocating the metal. 
Revere must avoid overselling its prod- 
ucts — while making sure it does not 
undersell its name. 

2. Industrial products as such do 
not lend themselves to a detailed sales 
pitch. 

3. As far as copper-clad stainless 
steel kitchen utensils go. Revere has the 
market pretty nearly sewed up, but 
while its three utensil factories have 
been running up to their capacity in 
orders, Revere wishes to maintain its 
leadership. 

4. Revere, conscious of its 151-year 
heritage and remembering 1932, when 
sales dipped to one-fifth the 1929 total, 
reasons that building up its name will 



help insure it against the economic un- 
certainties of the future. In addition. 
Revere has recently built itself up as 
an important aluminum fabricator. 

These facts about Revere, however, 
hide one of the more fascinating mer- 
chandising stories in the kitchen uten- 
sil business: the way this venerable 
firm, which had previously only gotten 
its feet wet in the consumer market, 
knocked the industry for a loop with 
its bold, imaginative introduction of 
a Cadillac-priced line of pots and pans. 
It scored a smashing success during 10 
years of selling and proved that the 
mass market would absorb a p rem rum 
kitchen product, proving that the aver- 
age housewife seeks quality in utensils. 



27 



A recent survey indicated that Re- 
vere has sold about 90% of the copper- 
clad stainless steel kitchen utensils. Its 
chief copper-bottom competitor on the 
open market is Ekco Products Co.. one 
of the giants of the consumer house- 
wares business and manufacturer of a 
widely diversified kitchen line. Sears. 
Roebuck & Co. puts out a private 
brand copper-bottom line made for it 
1>\ the Morris Manufacturing Co. 

Starting from scratch in the late 
Mil's copper-bottom utensils by 1951 
accounted for 27.4% of the total dol- 
lar sales df all pots and pans in de- 
partment stores. Other pot-and-pan 
figures are aluminum. 38.9%; glass. 
1 ().(>' i ; plain stainless steel. 7.1%; 
cast iron. 5.9%; enamel. 4.3%, and 
miscellaneous. 5.8' A . Copper bottoms 
are the fastest growing kitchen utensil 
line according to the same survey men- 
tioned above. 

The most exciting aspect of Revere 
Ware's future is the fact that the line 
was really beginning to hit pay dirt for 
the second time ( the first was shortly 
after its introduction I when a tighten- 
ing in the copper supply developed. 
The way the digging began was this: 

In 1946. St. Georges & Keyes. Inc., 
Revere's agency, conducted a survey 
for Macfadden Publications on the 
sales potentialities of the "wage- 
earner" group, particularly on the 
money availahle for hard goods. The 
agency was so impressed with the hid- 
den lodes it discovered — the fact that 
more money was available than would 
normally be expected — that it decided 
to make a pitch to Revere, urging the 
copper firm to really go after the large 
wage-earner market, rather than con- 
fine itself to the smaller women's ser- 
vice magazine market. Revere was 
convinced lit was already receiving a 
good volume of orders from industrial 
towns) and as a starter the agency 
bought space in American Weekly and 
Macfadden's True Story in 1947-48. 
The tight copper situation intervened 



and this advertising was discontinued. 

Revere's sponsorship of Meet the 
Press, which began late in 1950, was 
not considered wholly as a substitute 
for mass market magazine advertising 
but was the result of a decision based 
on a test of TV's selling power and the 
feeling that Revere should get familiar 
with TV. A year before. Revere had 
bought 13 weeks on the WABD, New 
York. Kathi Norris show to find out 
whether video could successfully push 
its Revere Ware, especially the pressure 
cooker, then selling at $14.95. The 
pressure cooker was meeting heavy 
competition from other brands and St. 
Georges & Keyes figured that if the 
New York metropolitan market was 
amenable to Revere's TV message, then 
a nationwide TV sales effort was 
worthwhile. 

The cookers went very well in the 
New York market although hard goods 
were moving very slowly at the time. 
As to the entire Revere line, it was 
found that New York sales increased 
faster than elsewhere. 

Revere and its agency then began 
casting around for a proper program. 
The worsening international situation 
plus Revere's radio experience with 
Exploring the Unknown, which it spon- 
sored on the Mutual web from 1945 
to 1947. suggested that an institutional 
format was the answer. The radio 
program was cancelled for a variety 
of reasons: I 1 ) the feeling that it had 
done its job in renewing the consum- 
er's acquaintance with Revere Ware; 
1 2 1 the recurring of another one of 
those copper scarcities which seems 
destined to plague the U.S. in the 
future; (3) the decision to go into 
magazines where color was available. 

Revere was pleased with Exploring 
the Unknown and was convinced by it 
that a public service or educational 
kind of program could command a 
large enough audience for Revere's 
purpose. Some of its Hooperatings 
were as high as 15 and an average 




Paul Revere <$c Son, 



At thvr BELL and CANNON FocndihY, a* the 
North Part cf BOSTON. 

CAST BELLS, of all fizes ; every kind 
of Brafs ORDNANCE, and every kind of 
Compof'tion rVvrh.for SHIPS, &C. at iht fnorteft noti<e ; 

Manufacture COPPER into Smuts. Bolts. 
Sjmk.es. Nails, Rivets, Dovetails, &c. from Mai- \ 

Uablt Copper. 

. They always keep, by them, every kind of 
Copper rofttnmg for Ships. They have now on 
hand, a number of Church and Ship Bells, of dif- 
ferent fiaci ; a large quantity of Sheathing Copper, 
from 16 up to 30 ounce ; Bolts, Spikes, Nails, Sec 
of all fi if s, which they warrant equal to Englifn 
manufacture. 

C»(h and the higheft price given for old Cop- 
per and Brafs** march 10 



Old 



Venerable advertiser Revere ran this ad in 1800s 



rating in 32 Hooper cities was six. Its 
listeners bought about 3.000.000 scien- 
tific pamphlets — at a dime a piece or 
13 for a $1. I Copy for the pamphlets 
was prepared by Science Illustrated. 
McGraw-Hill's post-war entry in the 
popular science sweepstakes. I 

It is conceivable that if the Korean 
War hadn't intervened. Revere might 
have gone in for less of a starched- 
collar approach on TV. As it was. 
Meet the Press, which was being car- 
ried by NBC on a sustaining basis, 
served Revere's purposes admirably. It 
was carried on Sunday, the institution- 
al day. It was figured that news- 
worthy statements uttered on the pro- 
gram would have little trouble in mak- 
ing Monday morning headlines since 
most political news breaks during the 
week. Until this past spring, it was 
aired during the late afternoon because 
superior nighttime slots were not avail- 
able. Revere got a new evening seg- 
ment in time for summer TV listening 
since Sunday afternoon audiences are 



STORYBOARD OF PROPOSED COMMERCIAL SHOWS WHAT HAPPENS WHEN POTS AND PANS ARE STUFFED IN CLOSET, POINTS UP CONVENIENCE 









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W6W Modern advertiser Revere uses TV. "Meet the Press" shot shows Governor Dewey on program when he announced support of Eisenhower 



comparative!) small during the hot 
months. There has been some talk 
about the program being on the 10:30 
to 11:00 p.m. slot in the fall. 

This latter nighttime slot has re- 
cently been appropriated for the sum- 
mer by one of Revere's competitors, 
Bohn Aluminum and Brass Corp., 
which simulcasts its American Forum 
of the Air and is a reminder that more 
than one metals firm followed Revere's 
footsteps in the Sunday, institutional 
approach. Aluminum Co. of America 
sponsors Ed Murrow's See It Now on 
CBS TV from 6:30 to 7:00 p.m. Alcoa 
makes aluminum kitchen ware and it, 
like Revere, divides its commercials 
between its industrial products and its 
pots and pans. 

These Sunday public service pro- 
grams have panned out pretty well for 
their sponsors as far as listenership 
goes. At the height of the winter listen- 
ing season. Meet the Press reaches 
about 2,300,000 homes. The average 
Nielsen rating for the two weeks. 27 



OF USING SPECIAL WALL RACK FOR REVERE WARE 



















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January and 3 February 1951 was 16.2. 

Ekco, whose products are solely in 
the consumer category, sponsored The 
Goldbergs during the past season along 
with Vitamin Corp. of America ( "Ry- 
butal" vitamins ) and Necchi Sewing 
Machine Sales Co. The program was 
on three times a week for 15 minutes 
until its summer hiatus began 4 July. 
The show will return in the fall on a 
single half hour weekly basis. The 
expectation is that one of the three 
last-year sponsors will buy the entire 
show but the problem of which one 
hasn't been settled yet. 

At first glance, it might seem strange 
that Revere sells its pots and pans to 
women via politics (even Revere's 
agency admits that men have little to 
say about such purchases I . But 48% 
of the Meet the Press audience are 
women, anyway (44% men, 8% chil- 
dren ) . Secondly, Revere is also selling 
copper products to men in industry 
and to the male consumer who is in- 
terested in the materials that go into 
the house he may buy or now lives 
in. Revere industrial salesmen have 
found a gratifying reaction to the pro- 
gram among men in the metallurgical 
business. 

In its commercials on Meet the Press, 
Revere wisely decided to leave out the 
middle-of-the-program sales pitch and 
was rewarded with hundreds of grate- 
ful letters from viewers. The opening 
commercial is a gentle, dignified re- 
minder that Revere Copper and Brass, 



Inc., serves industry and the consumer 
with research and a variety of products 
and has been doing so for 151 years. 

A typical commercial, used recently, 
went as follows: The TV picture dis- 
solved into a flip board showing the 
United Nations Secretariat Building in 
the background with a close-up of a 
hand on a door-knob. A caption said: 
"WHEN YOU TURN A DOOR- 
KNOB. The announcer ( unseen I re- 
peated the caption and went on '*. . .in 
any one of the United Nations major 
buildings, you meet Revere first hand. 
For Revere brass and bronze were 
used exclusively in the hardware for 
this great landmark of the world's hope 
for security. (Revere, it might be 
pointed out, does not make doorknobs 
but both brass and bronze are copper 
alloys.) 

The commercial went on making 
similar points about Revere metals in 
a calculator and a new steam and dry 
iron (with corresponding flipboard 
pictures and captions ) and ended up in 
a not-so-rash prediction that when 
there are rockets to the moon. Revere 
metals will in some way make the trip 
possible. 

The program itself has four reporters 
throwing more or less embarrassing 
questions at a key political figure. It 
is the policy of moderator Martha 
Rountree not to let the debate get too 
hot. The questioning panel consists 
of permanent member, Lawrence Spi- 
I Please turn to page 118) 



29 







A. J >c\ anej 
Symbolized above is current search by agencies for proper split of dollars among media 



How Vi is 
changing media 
buying patterns 



Agency trend spotter* see 

swing to greater markct-by-market 

interest with radio the gainer 



over-all 



The problem of how to 
split the media budget in 
the post TV freeze era seems to have 
taken precedence over all other dilem- 
mas now under consideration by the 
top-level agency strategist. His concep- 
tion of the way to allocate money to 
media is undergoing a process of re- 
evaluation which in scope is perhaps 
without comparison in the history of 
American advertising. 

At the uppermost levels of decision- 
making in New York's leading adver- 
tising agencies, intensive studies have 
been under way for months with the 
object of charting the "quo vadis" of 
the advertising dollar in terms of to- 
morrow's, as well as today's, maximum 
efficiency. Of no small spur to this re- 
evaluation was the sudden awakening 
among executives in advertiser circles 
to the hard economic facts of TV (as 
reported in sponsor. 24 March 1^")2. 
"Top management probes air media.") 

Men experienced in marketing direc- 
tion and media choice for annual bud- 
gets totaling in the tens of millions of 



30 



dollars have been diligently pursuing 
the answer to this question: How can 
we fit the advertising budget into a 
pattern that meets the latest marketing 
techniques and shifts in media evalua- 
tions? 

Under particular focus in this quest 
is radio. But also intimately related 
is where newspapers — especially the 
supplements, or metropolitan groups — 
and national entertainment magazines 
are headed. And. as noted in the open- 
ing paragraph, behind all these media 
probings television figures as the prime 
mover and unsettler of the apple-cart. 

sponsor has gone to the men en- 
gaged in this giant job of trend spot- 
ting at seven of the nation's largest 
agencies. Each of these men were 
asked to speak freely in so far as com- 
pany policy and self-interest permitted. 
Each agreed, provided their comments 
were not attributed to themselves or 
their agencies by name. (Despite their 
own conviction about the conservative 
soundness of their analyses, they feel 
inter-media factionalism, intra-agencx 



relations and other factors would raise 
a storm about them were they per- 
sonally quoted or their firms named, i 
The key conclusions of the agency 
men — likely to mold media planning 
for the next few years — are these: 

1. The main attention of national 
advertisers is shifting from the nation- 
al scene to the local. A tendenc\ to- 
ward decentralization in budget con- 
centration is becoming more and more 
apparent. Where once a network vehi- 
cle or a magazine campaign or a news- 
paper group came as second nature to 
such accounts, today the trend is to go 
into regional setups or market-by-mar- 
ket. Beneficiaries of this thinking will 
be spot radio, regional network radio, 
as well as locally selected newspapers 
to a lesser degree. 

2. Radio has been severely over- 
penalized as the result of television's 
appearance. True, TV packs unprece- 
dented and unmatched demonstrative 
— and therefore sales — power. True, 
TV has cut radio listening. However, 
radio's ')(>', penetration in the I nited 

SPONSOR 



States is a factor of such overwhelm- 
ing importance as to reduce other con- 
siderations. This medium is the only 
one, the agency men are advising their 
clients, which gives truly national (ov- 
erage — the maximum degree of cus- 
tomer saturation — and will never be 
displaced in that regard. 

3. The full appreciation of the thor- 
ough flexibility of radio and the econ- 
omy derivable from its proper localiza- 
tion had not been arrived at by polic) 
makers of business until recently. 

4. The process of media decentrali- 
zation will in due time become quite 
pronounced in TV also. With the ex- 
pansion of TV and the corollary in- 
creased resort to TV film programs, the 
tendency will